University of Minnesota
Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies
chgs@umn.edu
612-624-0256


Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies

Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies

The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS) promotes academic research, education and public awareness on the Shoah, other genocides and current forms of mass violence. Your generous support is key to maintaining the important work of the Center, advancing the hightest quality of scholarship, programs, and educational resources.

Student Opportunities

CHGS guides and mentors undergraduate and graduate students by organizing courses and workshops, offering grants and fellowships and providing unique opportunities for interaction with leading experts in the field. To find out more click here.

Professional and Educational Resources

CHGS supports educators through interactive workshops and institutes, facilitated by leading experts of Holocaust and genocide education. CHGS's website offers a myriad of resources for teaching age appropriate lessons about the Holocaust and genocide. To learn more click here.

Center News

  • THIS WEEK! Wednesday - Panel on the Politics of Mass Grave Exhumations and Human Rights

    Wednesday, November 16, 5:00 PM, 1210 Heller Hall

    “Necropolitics: Mass Graves and Exhumations in the Age of Human Rights” 

    Panel with FRANCISCO FERRÁNDIZ, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), ANTONIUS ROBBEN, University of Utrecht, and LINDSEY THOMAS, ‎Assistant Medical Examiner for Hennepin County;  moderated by UMN faculty LISA HILBINK, Political Science. 

    The panel will address the political and legal ramifications associated with exhumations of mass graves, and the process of compiling forensic evidence to aid in the investigation of suspicious deaths. The panel will reference the newly revised "The Minnesota Protocol" on extrajudicial killings, and two recent publications on related topics: Necropolitics, edited by Ferrandiz and Robben, which examines the complex social, political and psychological dimensions surrounding mass graves left by war and acts of terror in a variety of local contexts (Bosnia, Argentina, Spain, Korea, Rwanda among other countries) and Legacies of Violence in Contemporary Spain: Exhuming the Past, Understanding the Present, the recent book edited by L. Hilbink and O. Ferran.

    Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program. Made possible by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.
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  • NOW ON VIEW | "Displaced: Photos and Remembrances of Maxine Rude: 1945-1946"

    Displaced: Photos and Remembrances of Maxine Rude: 1945-1946

    Exhibition now on view!
    Eiger-Zaidenweber Holocaust Resource Center, Sabes Jewish Community Center 
    4330 Cedar Lake Rd S, Minneapolis, MN 55416


    Maxine Rude was a photographer for the United States Army and the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA), an organization formed to help the approximately 21million people displaced throughout Europe following World War Two.

    Photography can be a crucial component to news items, providing a visual narrative that has a life and power independent from written journalism. Over time, such photos can become icons, being the primary way people think about and imagine historic events. Photojournalism is therefore potentially quite powerful, shaping our understanding of history and the world.

    In the exhibit CHGS Director Alejandro Baer reflects on displaced persons in current contexts: "Comparisons to the Holocaust and the events that led to it have become commonplace when examining current events. The recent refugee crisis raises a range of comparisons between historical opinions about Jewish refugees before the Holocaust and opinions about contemporary refugees in America."

    Please visit the exhibit during open hours of the Sabes JCC.  Ask at the security desk for help in locating and accessing the exhibition space on the second floor of the JCC. 
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  • Course Offering for Spring 2017! GLOS 3900 (section 003) Topics in Global Studies: "Holocaust Art: History and Commemoration"

    GLOS 3900 - 003 Topics in Global Studies

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  • CHGS Fall 2016 Event & Program Calendar

    Wednesday-Friday, September 21-23
    “Local Action in Response to Migration” third annual international conference
    Room 101, Walter Library
    Organized by the Human Rights Program, the Local Action in Response to Migration Network, and Hispanic Issues Online; cosponsored by The Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair, Institute for Global Studies, Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, Department of Chicano & Latino Studies, Department of Spanish & Portuguese Studies, Immigration History Research Center, Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change.


    Thursday, September 29, 12:00 PM & 4:00 PM 
    “Displaced: Photos and Remembrances of Maxine Rude, 1945-1946” exhibit tours (12-4pm) and opening reception (4pm)
    Sabes Jewish Community Center, St. Louis Park
    With support from the Sabes Jewish Community Center.

    Thursday-Friday, September 29-30 
    “State and Society in Late Imperial Austria: A Symposium in Honor of Gary Cohen”
    1210 Heller Hall 
    Organized by the Center for Austrian Studies; cosponsored by the Institute for Global Studies, the Center Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Center for German and European Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and the Department of German, Scandinavian, and Dutch.

    Wednesday, October 26, 4:00 PM
    “Can the Story Be Told? History, Memory and Fiction in the Representation of Extreme Violence in Latin America” lecture by CARLOS PABÓN, University of Puerto Rico
    710 Social Sciences
    Cosponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Department of History.


    Wednesday, November 2, 7:00 PM
    “Reflections on the Unspoken” event featuring UMN faculty REBECCA KRINKE and LESLIE MORRIS reading from her memoir on her family’s Holocaust history, with vocalist RYLAND ANGEL
    Weisman Museum of Art, Davis Gallery
    Organized by the Weisman Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition
    The Talking Cure; cosponsored by the Center for Jewish Studies, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Department of Art History, Department of German, Scandinavian and Dutch, and the Institute for Advanced Study.

    Monday-Tuesday, November 14-15
    “Futures, Challenges and Transformations for Transitional Justice” workshop with CHGS talk by SIDNEY BLANCO, Chief Justice of the Constitutional Chamber of the Supreme Court of El Salvador
    University of Minnesota Law School
    Organized by the Transitional Justice Institute (Belfast), and UMN Human Rights Center and Human Rights Program; cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair, and Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.


    Wednesday, November 16, 5:00 PM
    “Necropolitics: Mass Graves and Exhumations in the Age of Human Rights” panel with FRANCISCO FERRÁNDIZ, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), ANTONIUS ROBBEN, University of Utrecht, and and LINDSEY THOMAS, ‎Assistant Medical Examiner for Hennepin County; moderated by UMN faculty LISA HILBINK, Political Science.
    1210 Heller Hall
    Made possible by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.



    (Continue Reading)
  • Art, Music, and Scholarship: "Reflections on the Unspoken"


    Wednesday, November 2

    7:00 PM 
    Weisman Museum of Art, Davis Gallery

    “Reflections on the Unspoken”

    Presented in conjunction with the Weisman Art Museum’s exhibition The Talking Cure, “Unspoken” is an experimental, interdisciplinary event that brings together scholar Leslie Morris, renowned countertenor Ryland Angel, and visual artist Rebecca Krinke. Attendees will hear excerpts of Morris’ hybrid memoir “She Did Not Speak,” which reflects on the elusive links between her unexplained coma and her family's buried Holocaust history, hear the world-premiere performance of Angel’s libretto composition inspired by Morris’ work, and be invited to contribute to Krinke’s participatory art installation, "What Needs to Be Said?"

    Register at z.umn.edu/UNSPOKEN


    Organized by the Weisman Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition The Talking Cure, in partnership with the Center for Jewish Studies, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Department of German, Scandinavian and Dutch, and the Institute for Advanced Study.  

    (Continue Reading)
  • Lecture on History, Memory and Fiction in the Representation of Extreme Violence in Latin America

    Wednesday, October 26, 4:00 PM
    “Can the Story Be Told? History, Memory and Fiction in the Representation of Extreme Violence in Latin America” 
    Lecture by CARLOS PABÓN, University of Puerto Rico
    710 Social Sciences
    Cosponsored by the Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese and the Dept. of History. 

    Prof. Pabón will reflect on the relation between history, memory and fiction in the representations of traumatic pasts, with particular focus on the debates in Latin America. He will address the often contested politics of memory and the uses of forgetfulness with respect to events of massive political violence in cases such as Argentina and Chile; and the relation of these politics with historical writing and other modes of representation, such as witness testimony.

    What aspects of a traumatic or catastrophic event must be remembered and how must we remember? What are the aesthetical, ethical and political implications of the narratives or representations of traumatic events of recent pasts? What are the limits of these representations?




    Carlos Pabón is professor of History at the University of Puerto Rico. He is the author of the books Nación postmortem. Ensayos sobre los tiempos de insoportable ambigüedad (San Juan, Ediciones Callejón, 2002); Polémicas. Política, intelectuales, violencia (San Juan, Ediciones Callejón, 2014); and Mínima política: textos breves y fragmentos sobre la crisis contemporánea (San Juan, Ediciones La Secta de los Perros, 2015). He is editor of the collection of essays titled El pasado ya no es lo que era. La historia en tiempos de incertidumbre (San Juan, Ediciones Vértigo, 2005); and has published a great number of articles and essays on nationalism, globalization, intellectuals, historiography and memory. 

    At present he is working on a book on the ethical and political implications of the representations of genocide and other forms extreme violence in the Twentieth Century; and the problem of history and memory of traumatic events in Latin America.
    (Continue Reading)

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