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Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies
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  • Performance of the Musical Drama Broucci (Fireflies), based on the Czech folktale performed at the Terezin / WWII Jewish camp-ghetto of Theresienstadt




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  • CHGS collections on view now at Wilson Library!

    Displaced: The Semiotics of Identity 
    Special exhibit on display from April 27 through May 13, 2016
    Open during Wilson Library business hours

    "Syriana," Melissa Boric
    Untitled, from "Silence is Golden," Bette Mittelman
    "Herbert Fantle," Felix de la Concha
    Displaced: The Semiotics of Identity is an on-site installation and digital exhibition that invites contemplation on issues of displacement, survival, and identity. Displacement is a deeply personal experience, and yet one that is implicitly collective.

    The curators are students from the semester-long Department of Art workshop "Be theCurator: Curatorial Theory and Practice." Local art educators, curators, and artists helped guide the process of making a relevant and meaningful exhibition, which involved intensive group exploration of the value of artistic expression, how to establish a scope of artworks and objects that is inclusive and exclusive, and design an exhibition that is educational and engaging. 

    Co-sponsored by the University Libraries, the Center for Holocaust And Genocide Studies, and theDepartment of Art.
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  • Holocaust Memorial Day event at CHGS in conjunction with HGMV


    Thursday, May 5, 4:00 PM
    710 Social Sciences Building
    *Holocaust Memorial Day*
    SIDI N'DIAYE, Research Fellow, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    The Role of Historical Hate Representations in the Murder of Neighbors in Rwanda (1994) and Poland (World War II)


    An examination of the place of historical and hatred representations in the murders of Jewish neighbors during the Second World War in Poland and of Tutsi neighbors, during the 1994 genocide. Through the analysis of these proximity massacres, two forms of extreme violence will be discussed in comparing the pitches and the conscious and unconscious psychological and theoretical justifications. 




    Dr. Sidi N’Diaye is a postdoctoral researcher at the Institut des Sciences sociales du Politique (ISP) at the Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense (France.) He received his PhD in Political Science from the Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense in 2012. A native speaker of Soninke, Dr. Sidi N’Diaye possess language skills in French, English, Arabic, Wolof, and Pulaar. While in residence at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, Dr. N’Diaye will work on his project, “Historical and Mental Representations in the Proximity of Massacres: A Comparative Approach of the Genocide of Tutsis from Rwanda and Jews from Poland through Murders of Neighbors.”

    Dr. N’Diaye has published two books: The Violent Past and the Policy of Repentance in Mauritania, 1989-2012 (LGDJ, 2013), and Dissonances, Melodies and Social Policies in Mauritania: Random Discussions and Free Fragments, co-authored with Abdarahmane Ngaidé (L'Harmattan, 2014). He expects to finish his next monograph project by the end of May 2016.


    Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, cosponsored by the African Studies Initiative and the Human Rights Program, held in conjunction with the Holocaust, Genocide, and Mass Violence (HGMV) interdisciplinary graduate student group.
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