University of Minnesota
Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies
chgs@umn.edu
612-624-0256


CHGS

Center News

  • Student Opportunities

    CHGS guides and mentors undergraduate and graduate students by organizing courses and workshops, offering grants and fellowships and providing unique opportunities for interaction with leading experts in the field. To find out more click here.

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  • Professional and Educational Resources

    CHGS supports educators through interactive workshops and institutes, facilitated by leading experts of Holocaust and genocide education. CHGS's website offers a myriad of resources for teaching age appropriate lessons about the Holocaust and genocide. To learn more click here.

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  • Upcoming in October, international artist DANIEL BLAUFUKS: Local events to include Artist Talk (Oct 13) and Film Screening (Oct 15)

    The Twin Cities, the University of Minnesota, and CHGS welcome a visit by Lisbon-based German-Jewish media artist DANIEL BLAUFUKS


    Artist talk and scholarly roundtable discussion
    Tuesday, October 13
    5:30 - 7:30 PM
    Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities 
      Panel to include University of Minnesota faculty Gary Cohen (History), Paula Rabinowitz (English), Alice Lovejoy (Cultural Studied and Comparative Literature), and Leslie Morris (German, Scandinavian and Dutch); and David Harris (RIMON: The Minnesota Jewish Arts Council, an initiative of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation)
        Meet the artist and film screening
        Thursday, October 15
        10:00 - 11:30 AM Coffee with the artist
        10:00 AM - 5:00 PM Als Ob / As If film installation on the Czech city of Terezín (which was formerly the Jewish ghetto of Theresienstadt)
        Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities


        Daniel Blaufuks is an acclaimed artist working in Lisbon and exhibiting internationally. His exhibition, "All the Memory of the World, Part One," has as its theme the creation of memory through media. In other words: the use of film and photography to create memories, even memories that are actually fictional. Please read more about this exhibition here.

        At the center of the exhibition is "Als Ob / As If," a monumental 4-hour film installation. In Als Ob, Blaufuks combines footage he shot in 2014 in the Czech city of Terezín, which was formerly the Jewish ghetto of Theresienstadt, with footage from Nazi propaganda films. The contemporary clips are of everything that makes up the life of a normal city. They are reflected in clips from the fake documentary "Theresienstadt" made by the Germans in 1944, which pretended to show how normal the city/ghetto/concentration camp was. In the propaganda film, we see the elderly passing by, children playing, and chess-playing men. Combining clips from these two films is powerful, especially as Blaufuks purposely filmed some scenes in the same locations that the Nazi video depicts.



        Blaufuks was born in Lisbon in 1963 to a family of Jewish German refugees. He studied at Ar.Co (Centro de Arte e Comunicação Visual), Lisbon, at the Royal College of Art, London and at the Watermill Foundation, New York.  He exhibits widely and works mainly in photography and video, presenting his work through books, installations and films.

        The documentary "Under Strange Skies" was shown at the Lincoln Center in New York. His exhibitions include: Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon, Palazzo delle Papesse, Siena, LisboaPhoto, Centro Cultural de Belém, Lisbon, Elga Wimmer Gallery, New York, Photoespaña, Madrid, where his book Under Strange Skies received the award for Best Photography Book of the Year in the International Category in 2007, the year he received the BES Photo Award as well. He published Terezín with Steidl, Götingen. In 2011 he had a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro and in 2014 at the National Museum of Contemporary Art in Lisbon. For more information see http://www.danielblaufuks.com

        Event organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, co-sponsored by the Center for Austrian Studies, Center for Jewish Studies, Center for German and European Studies, College of Liberal Arts, Department of Art, Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, Department of English, Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch, Department of History, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Institute for Advanced Studies, Weisman Art Museum, and Macalester College. Additional support from RIMON: The Minnesota Jewish Arts Council, an initiative of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation.
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      • Upcoming film screening and talk on September 24: Walter Manoschek, "If that's true, then I'm a murderer!"

        Thursday, September 24, 2015
        4:00 - 6:00 PM
        Film screening and talk
        1210 Heller Hall

        If that's True, then I'm a Murderer: Adolf Storms and the Massacre of Hungarian Jews in Deutsch Schuetzen
        film director Walter Manoschek, professor of political science at the University of Vienna 



        ...dann bin ich ja ein Mörder! (70 min), a film created by Professor Walter Manoschek together with his students at the University of Vienna, the story of SS junior squad leader Adolf Storms, who has never been held account-able for the death of about sixty Hungarian Jewish forced laborers shot by three SS men in the village of Deutsch-Schützen in the Austrian province of Burgenland. In conversations with Storms, HJ leaders who were accessories of the crime, and Jews who survived the massacre, the crime is reconstructed and questions are asked about forgetting, repression and responsibility. The film had it's world premier at the Viennale Film Festival 2012, where it won the Prize of Recognition of the City of Vienna.

        A timely event with the recent trial of the former SS-man, Oskar Groening who served in Auschwitz and stands accused of war crimes. 

        Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, with co-sponsorship by the Center for Austrian Studies.
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      • Upcoming talk, September 29: Michiko Harada, hibakusha (atomic bomb victim), speaking for peace


        Michiko Harada

        Hibakusha (atomic bomb victim)

        September 29, 2015
        4:00 PM
        155 Nicholson Hall
        East Bank
        University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

        2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II with the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan; it also marks the 60th anniversary of the friendship between St. Paul and Nagasaki as sister cities. To commemorate, the Nagasaki National Peace Memorial Hall for Atomic Bomb Victims (PMH) is sending the Hiroshima Nagasaki Peace Exhibition, which will be on display at the Landmark Center in Saint Paul from August 22 to Thanksgiving. 

        Accompanying events include a film screening, and a talk at the University of Minnesota by Ms. Michiko Harada, a hibakusha (atomic bomb victim), who will travel from Nagasaki and speak about her experience with the atomic bomb and why she speaks for peace.

        Talk organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies as part of events made possible by the St. Paul-Nagasaki Sister City Committee, the Nagasaki National Peace Memorial Hall for Atomic Bomb Victims, and the United States - Japan Foundation. Co-sponsored by the University of Minnesota Department of History and the Human Rights Program.
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      • Courses of interest for the Fall 2015 semester

          GER 1905 -- Freshman Seminar: Remediating the Holocaust (Leslie Morris, Th 4:40-7:10pm, Kolthoff Hall 139)

          HIST 3727 -- History of the Holocaust (Melissa Kelley, M/W 9:45-11:00am, Nicholson 110)
          Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians. 

          GCC 3002 -- Grand Challenges: Beyond War and Atrocity (Alejandro Baer, Catherine Guisan, Tu/Th 11:15-12:30pm, Anderson Hall 330)

          SOC 4104 -- Crime and Human Rights (Joachim Savelsberg, Tu/Th 2:30-3:45pm, Blegen 225)

          AMIN 1001 -- American Indian Peoples in the United States (Tu/Th 1:00-2:15, Elliott N647)
          Introduction to how voices/visions of indigenous peoples have contributed to history of cultural expression in North America. Historic contexts/varieties of this expression by region, tribal cultures. Emphasizes contributions in literature, philosophy, politics, fine arts.

          AMIN 1003 -- American Indians in Minnesota (multiple listings)
          History, culture, and lived experience of American Indian people in Minnesota. Self-representation and histories of Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) and Dakota peoples through film, music, oral traditions, and written texts. Work by non-Indian scholars focuses on cultural, philosophical, and linguistic perspectives of Anishinaabe and Dakota peoples.

          HIST 3872 -- American Indian History since 1830 (W 6:20-8:30, Blegen 110)
          Focus on the impact of federal Indian policy on American Indian cultures and societies, and on American Indian culture change.

          HIST 5940 -- Topics in Asian History: Cultures of Modernity and Memories of the Past in East Asia (Liping Wang, W 3:35-5:30, Carlson 1-122)

          PubH 6801 / 3802 -- Health and Human Rights (Kirk Allison, W 5:40-8:30pm)

          POL 8260 -- Topics in Political Theory: Colonialism (Th 3:35-5:20pm, Soc Sci 1383)

          POL 8660 -- Topics in Comparative Politics: Authoritarian Regimes (David Samuels, Tu 1:25-3:20pm, Blegen 330)

          SPAN 3221 -- Interpreting Colonial Latin America: Empire and Early Modernity (Raul Marrero-Fente, Tu/Thu 1:00-2:15pm, Nicholson 120)
          Conquest, colonization, and forms of resistance in Latin America.

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          • How to understand and decode humor in the Terezin ghetto: A Sunday afternoon talk by Dr. Lisa Peschel following matinee stage performance of WHY WE LAUGH

            Dr. Lisa Peschel, University of York
            "Translating Terezín"
            A talk to follow Sunday matinee performance of Why We Laugh
            (to conclude long before sundown)

            WHY WE LAUGH 
            Sunday Matinee Performance
            September 13
            2:00 PM
            Open Eye Figure Theatre
            506 East 24th Street, Minneapolis MN 55404

            Admission is $20general; $15 for students, seniors, and MN Fringe button holders.
            Tickets are available through Open Eye Figure Theatre or through Brown Paper Tickets.

            WHY WE LAUGH is a new adaptation of Laugh with Us!, an original cabaret by Felix Porges, Vítězslav Horpatzky, Pavel Weisskopf and Pavel Stránský, written and performed in 1944 in the World War II Jewish Ghetto at Terezín, just 40 miles northwest of Prague (English translation & dramaturgy by Lisa Peschel).

            Dr. Lisa Peschel, the scholar who discovered the cabaret texts and translated them into English (they are collected in the book Performing Captivity, Performing Escape) will deliver a brief talk after the performance on Sunday, September 13. Entitled Translating Terezin, it will be the story of Peschel’s search for the meaning of the text—how, with the aid of survivors she cracked the code of the slang and inside jokes to capture the prisoners’ unique, resilient sense of humor. A question and answer period will follow.


            The cabaret, complete with its original sheet music, came to light in the spring of 2005 in two separate family archives. The original cabaret is set in a postwar Prague identical to the beloved city the Czech Jews remembered from the late 1930s. In playwright Kira Obolensky’s new adaptation, characters based on the original Terezín performers encounter “the scholar,” a theater historian from our present.  As the performers look forward to the postwar future and the scholar looks back toward their past, they confront each other with difficult questions: Why did the Terezín prisoners laugh, and what does that laughter mean to us today?

            For more information please visit Fortune's Fool Theatre.

            Talk organized by the Center for Austrian Studies, co-sponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Center for Jewish Studies.  Production of Why We Laugh is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund; and by a grant from RIMON: The Minnesota Jewish Arts Council, an initiative of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation.
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          • September 16 talk by Benjamin Frommer -- The Last Jews: Intermarried Families in the Nazi Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia

            Wednesday, September 16
            4:00 PM
            Benjamin Frommer, Northwestern University

            The Last Jews: Intermarried Families in the Nazi Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia
            710 Social Sciences Building



            This talk will address the fate of intermarried Jewish-Gentile families in the Germany occupied Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia during the Second World War.  Intermarried Jews and their progeny formed a special category in the lands ruled by the Nazis.  On the one hand, many who had married Gentiles and even converted to Christianity found themselves forcibly recategorized as Jews and subject to antisemitic persecution and the threat of arrest.  On the other hand, the intermarried had stronger ties to the majority communities, were exempted from certain restrictions and some deportations, and ultimately survived the war in far greater numbers than endogamous Jews.  In time, as Nazi Germany deported more and more Jews to concentration camps and ghettos, intermarried Jews and their progeny increasingly became the “last Jews” alive in the Protectorate.

            Organized by the Center for Austrian Studies, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.
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          • Upcoming Talk on October 21 by author Lou Ureneck: Archival Research at the University's Libraries, and "The Great Fire" at Smyrna


            Wednesday, October 21, 2015
            3:30 PM
            Andersen Library


            CHGS, with the University of Minnesota Libraries, is pleased to announce an upcoming talk by Boston University professor and journalist Lou Ureneck on his recently published book, The Great Fire: One American's Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century's First Genocide, the harrowing story of a Methodist Minister and a principled American naval officer who helped rescue more than 250,000 refugees during the persecution of Armenian and Greek Christians, published to coincide with the Armenian genocide’s centennial in 2015.




            Sure to be an engaging speaker, Professor Ureneck conducted much of his research in writing the book in the U of M Library's extensive Kautz Family YMCA Archives, highlighting the University’s unique ability to place historic events in context, and provide primary sources for study and scholarship.  Catherine Guisan, faculty in the Department of Political Science, will provide a brief overview of the history and politics of the time.   


            Co-organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Kautz Family YMCA Archives, co-sponsored by the University of Minnesota Libraries and the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair.  With additional support from the Center for Modern Greek Studies.
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          • Upcoming talk on November 18: Canadian scholar, Adam Muller, on colonial genocide and empathy

            Embodying Empathy: Canadian Settler-Colonial Genocide and the Making of a Virtual Indian Residential School
            Adam Muller, University of Manitoba 
            November 18, 2015
            University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

            This presentation introduces and reflects on some of the key challenges facing researchers involved with the multidisciplinary critical and creative Embodying Empathy project now underway at the University of Manitoba. Embodying Empathy seeks to construct a digital representation of a Canadian Indian Residential School (IRS) using virtual and augmented reality technologies. The project’s digital “storyworld” is being designed as a museum-quality educational tool that will instruct those immersed in it about Canadian settler-colonial genocide. It also seeks to ascertain whether immersive representations can bridge the empathetic distance separating victims from secondary witnesses to atrocity.


            Adam Muller is Associate Professor of English at the University of Manitoba (Canada).  He specializes in the representations of war, genocide and mass violence, human rights, memory studies, critical theory, cultural studies, and analytic philosophy.

            Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies with support from the IAS Collaborative, "Reframing Mass Violence."
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          • Holocaust Education in a Global Context Teacher Workshop, June 15-18

            The genocide of the Jews during World War II has become a global reference point to raise awareness about state violence and human rights abuses. This summer institute will explore the opportunities and challenges of Holocaust education and memorialization in diverse cultural contexts, particularly in heterogeneous classrooms in which students have no connection with the history of the Jewish people and Nazi crimes.

            Adam Blackler delivers a brief history of the Holocaust to our engaged group of workshop participants
            The institute addresses the historical and sociological significance of the Holocaust in a comparative genocide framework (Native American, Armenian, Cambodian and Rwandan genocides) and provides hands on activities - with survivor testimony, literature, art and film - designed to help educators create activities and lessons accessible to all learners that they can incorporate into their classrooms.





            Elizabeth Baer
            Monday, June 15
            8:30 - 9:00 -- Registration
             9:00 - 9:30 -- Introduction (Alejandro Baer)
            9:30 - 12:00 -- Brief History of the Holocaust (Adam Blackler)
            12:00 - 1:00 -- Lunch
            1:00 - 3:30 -- The Crime of Genocide: Definition, Ambivalences, Implications (Alejandro Baer)

            Group lunch at Middlebrook Hall
            Tuesday, June 16
            9:00 - 12:00 -- Colonial Genocides and the Holocaust: Continuities and Breaches (Elizabeth Baer)
            12:00 - 1:00 -- Lunch
            1:00 - 3:30 -- Global Holocaust Memory: Challenges and Opportunities (Alejandro Baer)
            Field trip to Bdote Dakota site of Ft. Snelling State Park

            Wednesday, June 17
            9:00 - 12:00 -- Field Trip: Guided Tour of Bdote site, Ft. Snelling State Park (Sandra Geshick)
            12:00 - 1:00 -- Lunch
            1:00 - 3:30 -- Gender and Memory in the Holocaust (Elizabeth Baer)

            Joe Eggers presented a robust set of resources by topic

            Thursday, June 18
            9:00 - 11:00 -- Presentation of Holocaust / Genocide education resources (Joe Eggers)
            11:00 - 12:00 -- Teaching and Research with Audiovisual Testimonials (Susan Gangl)
            12:00 - 1:00 -- Lunch
            1:00 - 3:00 -- Presentation of Best Practices (participant-led)
            3:00 - 3:30 -- Course Feedback and Follow-up

            Thanks to everyone for a successful workshop and great learning experience!
            Events made possible by the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.
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          • Community Event | Deportation in the Armenian Genocide: TMORA special exhibition, June 20-22

            The Museum of Russian Art (TMORA) in Minneapolis, MN, in collaboration with the St. Sahag Armenian Church of St. Paul, Minnesota, will host a three-day exhibition dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, open from June 20 to June 22, 2015. The materials for the exhibition were provided by the Armenian National Institute, an organization focusing on “the study, research and affirmation of the Armenian genocide.” This exhibition, THE FIRST DEPORTATION: THE GERMAN RAILWAY, THE AMERICAN HOSPITAL, AND THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE is a project of the Armenian National Institute, Armenian Genocide Museum of America, and
            Armenian Assembly of America.

            The exhibit reveals various facets of the genocide, including the deportations, executions, massacres, murders, starvation, extermination and destruction. It also documents the immediate aftermath of the atrocities, attesting to the catastrophic destruction of the Armenian society in the Ottoman Turkish Empire. The scale and depth of the uprooting of the Armenian people are revealed through twenty-four panels filled with photographs, documents and explanatory texts.

            The deportation of 1915. The entire Armenian population of eight
            towns—about 170,000 in total—had been put on the road.


            The First Deportation: The German Railway, The American Hospital, and the Armenian Genocide is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a Minnesota State Arts Board Operating Support grant, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund, and a grant from the Wells Fargo Foundation Minnesota.
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          • Daniel Levy "The Past: Between History and Memory" | Keynote as part of International Symposium on the 70th Anniversary of the Conclusion of WWII in Europe

            International Symposium:
            War, what is it good for? Uses and Abuses of Second World War History

            Keynote:
            The Past: Between History and Memory
            Daniel Levy 

            Friday, May 8, 2015
            1210 Heller Hall
            University of Minnesota

            In 1969 Edwin Starr famously asked "war, what is it good for?" and answered "absolutely nothing." Regardless of whether organized violence is ever a good way to achieve various political goals, war history is often usable past in the present. Second World War as the "good war" or the "great patriotic war" can be put to many uses by contemporary political actors. This event explored the actual and potential uses of second world war history 70 years after war's end in Europe.

            The one-day symposium addressed the usage of war history in both, international and domestic politics. For the international sphere the main focus was on the use of the war in contemporary European politics, especially in Russia, Central and Eastern Europe, the West, and in relations between them. Is history politics just continuation of war by other means or can war history be used to build peaceful relations between former enemies? In the domestic sphere WWII history is mostly used to construct unified nations, but in the symposium participants analyzed how war history has been or could be used in emancipatory ways to empower marginalized groups within societies.

            levy.jpg
            Professor Daniel Levy (Sociology, Stony Brook University and author of Memory Unbound: The Holocaust and the Formation of Cosmopolitan Memory

            In his keynote, "The Past: Between History and Memory", Levy addressed the contested relationship between history and memory, changing time conceptions, the role of nation-state formation, and the human rights regime. Levy drew from his work on cosmopolitanization, noting that global norms and narratives intersect with local practices in generative ways, shaping new realities. He highlighted the example of the Holocaust as having made the transition from European to global cypher, thus becoming legible in differing contexts around the world.  





            10:00-11:45
            Morning session

            Social Sciences 710

            10:00-10:15
            Welcome words: Matti Jutila, Alejandro Baer
            10:15-11:00
            Keynote: Daniel Levy (Sociology, Stony Brook University)
            "The Past: Between History and Memory"

            The connection between history and memory has a long and contentious relationship. Recent scholarship associated with the so-called third wave of memory studies is challenging some of the historiographical presuppositions of what a past consists of. This talk will address some of these trajectories and advance a number of conceptual suggestions.
            11:00-11:45
            Comments and discussion: Thomas Wolfe, Matti Jutila, Erma Nezirevic





            2:00-2:45
            Afternoon session 1: International History Politics in Europe

            Heller Hall 1210

            Thomas Wolfe (History, University of Minnesota): "Putin's History"
            How do authoritarian regimes both need and ignore the writing of history? Putin's Russia offers on the one hand a striking example of a regime building an image of its deep historical roots in Russia's past, including aspects of the Soviet past, and particularly the Great Patriotic War. But at the same time the regime has no interest in acknowledging the past as something "unknown," or as something for which people might mobilize themselves for change. Our discussion will try to unpack this paradox.

            Juhana Aunesluoma (Political History, University of Helsinki): "All Quiet on the Western Front? European Identity, Wold War II and Politics of Remembrance in Western Europe"
            In the 1990s the memory of the Holocaust was introduced under the concept of European cultural heritage. Auschwitz and similar sites were added on EU-managed lists of monuments of European cultural heritage. However, there have also been calls to include places like Dresden as appropriate places of mourning and remembrance, highlighting the suffering of ordinary Germans during the war. While the forms and boundaries of the politics of remembrance in contemporary Europe have been extended to include diverse groups and also victims of Stalinist terror, it has not been easy to integrate the dark shadows of Europe's past in all their complexity into notions of European identity and a common European cultural heritage.


            2:45-3:30
            Afternoon session 2: Politics of New Forms of Commemoration

            Heller Hall 1210

            Rick McCormick (German, Scandinavian and Dutch, University of Minnesota): "From the 'Rubble Film' to the 'Heritage Film' and Beyond: Representations of WWII and the Holocaust in German Cinema"
            The very first post-WWII German film, made in the Soviet zone of Berlin, attempted to deal with Nazi war crimes, but it also focused on a traumatized German soldier as a victim of the Nazis rather than telling the story of the woman in the film who helps to heal him, who is herself a former concentration camp inmate. German attempts to deal with the Nazi past in film on both sides of the Cold War served different political agendas but were mostly silent about the plight of the Jews. In the aftermath of the surprising impact in West Germany of the American miniseries Holocaust in the late 1970s, and later, after German unification, the huge success of Spielberg's film Schindler's List in the early 1990s, things changed. Since the late 1990s the plight of the Jews is almost always thematized in big-budget historical films about WWII made in Germany, but these so-called "heritage" films seem to be marketing a past that is safely sealed off from the present. One recent example is the TV miniseries Generation War (Unsere Muetter, unsere Vaeter), which includes a Jewish character, albeit a not very plausible one, among its protagonists. But this kind of "heritage" narrative is also critiqued by some younger filmmakers.

            Jodi Elowitz: "Creating an Archive for a New Generation: The Holocaust Memory as Illustrated in Animated Short Films"
            Have we reached our limit on the use of the traditional images of the archive in representing the Holocaust in documentary film? How will filmmakers engage the next generation of viewers to invite them to watch narratives of the Holocaust? I believe the answer lies in the use of artistic representation in the form of animated short films. In this presentation I will explore how animation is replacing the use of traditional archival footage in order to create new imagery based on the representation and memory that has been shaped by the limited photographic and film record of the Holocaust.




            3:30-3:45
            Coffee Break

            3:45-4:30
            Afternoon session 3: Empowering the Marginalized

            Heller Hall 1210

            Elaine May (American Studies, University of Minnesota): "Women on the Home Front"
            World War II opened up many new opportunities for women to pursue work and other social, sexual, and public activities that had not been available to them prior to the war. This presentation will open up discussion on the ways in which women's lives changed during the war, and the extent to which those changes carried forward into the postwar era.

            Matti Jutila (Political Science, University of Minnesota): "Diverse Country, Diverse Soldiers, Homogenic War Narrative: Diversifying Finnish WWII History Politics"
            The hegemonic Finnish WWII narrative presents Finnish soldiers as white, Finnish speaking, Christian (Evangelical Lutheran), heterosexual men. Relying on this image, Finnish populist right uses war history in its nationalist, anti-immigration politics. In my presentation I will address the war experiences of Muslim, Jewish, Roma, Russian and gay soldiers in the Finnish armed forces and discuss the potential uses of this history in supporting an inclusive, multicultural society today.



            4:30-4:45
            Concluding remarks

            Heller Hall 1210


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          • A review of "Can One Laugh at Everything? Satire and Free Speech After Charlie"

            On January 29 the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies and the Department of French & Italian as well as several other centers and departments at the University of Minnesota hosted a discussion "Can One Laugh at Everything? Satire and Free Speech After Charlie." Speakers included Anthony Winer (William Mitchell College of Law); William Beeman (Anthropology); Jane Kirtley (Journalism); Bruno Chaouat (French & Italian); and Steven Sack (Editorial Cartoonist, Minneapolis Star Tribune).

            CharlieHebdoEvent.jpg


            Charlie event pic.jpg




            The conversation addressed the topic of free speech after the attacks on the French magazine Charlie Hebdo in early January from a variety of perspectives: comparing U.S. and European legislative contexts, addressing figurative representation in the Islamic tradition, and the rise of anti-Semitism in Europe. Free speech, issues of power, inequality, racism, and hate speech were also brought up. Steven Sack made a case for the simultaneous potency and vulnerability of cartoons as a medium. The organizers noted that this event was intended as a starting point to a larger conversation and hoped that the discussion continues both in classrooms and beyond.
            Initially covered by MPR, press coverage after the event has continued to be strong, particularly regarding controversy over the image used in the flyer to promote the talk in the days and weeks leading up to it. Read about the controversy in Inside Higher Ed, the Washington Post, and the local Star and Tribune.
            Click here for an audio recording of the talks.
            Here for the visuals accompanying Bill Beeman's talk.
            Here for the visuals accompanying Bruno Chaouat's talk.

            photos below courtesy of Steve Foldes (left to right, top to bottom): Anthony Winer, William Beeman, Jane Kirtley, Bruno Chaouat, and Steven Sack.
            Thumbnail image for Anthony Winer.jpg

            William Beeman.jpg

            Jane Kirtley.jpg

            Thumbnail image for Charlie Hebdo-2028.jpg

            Thumbnail image for Charlie Hebdo-2014.jpg

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          • Final HGMV Workshop of the Year | Ore Koren (Political Science) on Reparations of Mass Killings

            Thursday, May 7, 3:00 pm
            710 Social Sciences
            Ore Koren (Department of Political Science)
            "Exploring the Alternatives: The Role of Customary Justice Mechanisms in Post-Conflict Contexts"

            This paper argues that reparations for mass killing are a rare, diffusive event, and that in order to understand it one must first identify where diffusion can actually occur and then account for factors that might govern the diffusive process. I begin by applying extant theories of international policy diffusion and international law to the study of reparations for mass killing. The viability of this approach is then tested on newly available data on reparations for the years 1971-2011 by incorporating a Bayesian/MCMC hierarchical and spatial split-population framework that accounts for the aforementioned issues.

            diffusion.png

            Ore Koren is a PhD candidate at the Department of Political Science and a MSc candidate at the Department of Applied Economics. His fields of research are international relations and research methodology, focusing on political violence, civil conflict, and mass killing.

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          • Armenian Genocide Centennial | CHGS events in commemoration of the 100th anniversary, April 23-25

            Facebook image-2 copy.pngAs we approach the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Human Rights Program and the Institute for Global Studies will be hosting three days of events to commemorate this centennial. The events will include the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Lecture featuring Professor Bedross Der Matossian, which is open to the public (April 23), a student conference, entitled "One Hundred Years of Genocide" (April 24), open to the public, and a K-16 teacher workshop (April 25).

            The objectives of these events are to promote public understanding of the genocide and the fates of those who lost their lives and those who escaped. The events will also analyze responses by the international community, and discuss the long-term implications for international policy and actions to prevent and respond to genocide.

            Thursday, April 23, 7:00pm
            Bedross Der Matossian, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

            "The Armenian Genocide Historiography on the Eve of the Centennial: From Continuity to Contingency"
            Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Humphrey Forum
            open to the public

            Friday, April 24, 8:45am - 5:00pm
            100 Years of Genocide - Student Conference

            Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Room #25
            open to the public

            Saturday, April 25, 8:45am - 3:00pm
            World War I and the Armenian Genocide - Teacher Workshop

            1210 Heller Hall

            Saturday, April 25, 11:00am - 1:00pm
            Guided Tour of Bdote, sacred Dakota site at Ft. Snelling State Park

            led by Professor Iyekiyapiwin Darlene St. Clair

            Events organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Human Rights Program, Institute for Global Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, and Ohanessian Chair. Made possible by the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.

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          • Tour of Bdote, sacred Dakota site at Ft. Snelling State Park

            Saturday, April 25
            11:00am - 1:00pm
            Ft. Snelling State Park


            We are living, learning, and working in a particular place with a long, fascinating, troubling, and frequently unknown story. One goal for this tour is that participants begin to experience the place we live in as Mnisota Makoce, the Dakota Homelands. We will be visiting several Dakota sacred sites located in an area that would later be called the Twin Cities. How has colonization impacted Dakota use and access to these places? How have Dakota people asserted a continuing relationship with these places? This tour will provide participants with a more nuanced and complicated understanding of the place we call home.

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            Iyekiyapiwiƞ Darlene St. Clair is an Associate Professor at Saint Cloud State University where she teaches American Indian Studies and directs the Multicultural Resource Center. Her work focuses on several areas: Dakota Studies, the integration of Native cultures, histories and languages into curricula and educational institutions, and the arts and cultural expressions of Native peoples. She is Bdewakaƞtuƞwaƞ Dakota and an enrolled member of the Lower Sioux Indian Community in Minnesota.



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          • Panel on "Shanghailander" Jewish Refugees

            Thursday, April 23
            9:30 - 11:30am
            Northrop Auditorium

            China Day is an annual half-day event that brings together Minnesota high school students who study Chinese at the University of Minnesota. Keynote speakers include a panel of "Shanghailanders," individuals who lived in Shanghai as Jewish refugees during the Holocaust. Panelist will speak about their life in Shanghai and share with students what Shanghai was like during a critical time in history. The theme coincides with an exhibit that the Confucius Institute will be sponsoring, Jewish Refugees in Shanghai.

            The panel discussion will be facilitated by Alejandro Baer, Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and professor in the Department of Sociology.

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          • Director of Programs on Ethics, Religion, and the Holocaust at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in D.C. to give talk on the Implications of the Holocaust for Multireligious Conversations, April 22

            Luncheon program featuring Victoria Barnett
            Director of Programs on Ethics, Religion, and the Holocaust at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
            Wednesday, April 22, 11:45am
            Mt. Zion Temple, St. Paul
            For reservations: bfriend@stpauljcc.org

            VickiBarnett.jpg

            As the event of the Holocaust recedes further into human history, popular and academic understandings of its implications have grown broader. Today, the history of the Holocaust is often taught comparatively in courses on human rights, ethics, and contemporary genocide. And as we become increasingly aware of the multireligious nature of our world, interfaith conversations focus on the commonalities and tensions between and among people of various religions, not just Judaism and Christianity. How can recent scholarship about the Holocaust inform these newer conversations, and how in turn have these developments shaped the field of Holocaust studies? How can the Holocaust be understood in its historical particularities as well as in terms of more universal questions? Victoria Barnett will discuss these developments and how they are being addressed in the field of Holocaust studies and in interreligious circles.
            For more information see the University of St. Thomas and Saint John's University Jay Phillips Center for Interfaith Learning
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          • Minneapolis Premiere: Video Project from acclaimed Barcelona-born American artist Francesc Torres

            Francesc Torres: What does History Know of Nail Biting?
            Tuesday, April 21
            4:30 - 6:00 pm
            Lindahl Founders Room, Northrop Auditorium
            University of Minnesota

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            What does History Know of Nail Biting? the latest multi-channel video work from acclaimed Barcelona-born American artist Francesc Torres, examines the extraordinary history of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, a group of American volunteers who went to fight for the Republican side during the Spanish Civil War (1936-39), juxtaposing recently recovered archival footage of these soldiers and their battles with recent documentation of the sites of major military encounters.

            Organized by the Iberian Studies Initiative in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese Studies. Co-sponsored by the Institute for Global Studies; the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies; the Institute for Advanced Study; the Departments of Art, Art History, and History; Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, U of M Duluth; and Spanish Discipline, The Division of Humanities, U of M Morris.

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          • Norway and the Holocaust | Special Guest Lecture by Author and Survivor Irene Berman, April 23

            Irene Berman
            "We are going to Pick Potatoes", Norway and the Holocaust, the Untold Story


            Thursday, April 23
            11:15 - 12:30pm
            350 Anderson Hall
            West Bank, University of Minnesota
            open to the public

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            Irene Levin Berman was born and raised in Norway. As a young child in 1942 she escaped to Sweden, a neutral country during World War II, to avoid annihilation. Nazi Germany had invaded Norway and the deportation of two thousand Norwegian Jews had begun. Seven members of her father's immediate family were among the 771 victims who were unable to escape and were murdered in Auschwitz.

            In 2005 Irene was forced to begin to examine the label of being a Holocaust survivor. Her strong dual identity as a Norwegian and a Jew led her to explore previously unopened doors in her mind. "We Are Going to Pick Potatoes" Norway and the Holocaust, The Untold Story is not a narrative of the Holocaust alone, but the remembrances of growing up Jewish in Norway during and after WWII.

            For more information see www.norwayandtheholocaust.com

            This event will meet with Adam Blackler's "History of the Holocaust" course, but is free and open to the public. Please join us.

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          • HGMV Workshop, Thu April 16: Holocaust Commemoration in Turkey and Spain

            Thursday, April 16
            HGMV Workshop

            Yagmur Karakaya and Alejandro Baer:
            "Remembering to Forget? Holocaust Commemoration in Turkey and Spain"


            3:00pm
            710 Social Sciences

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            As a consequence of diverse but converging transnational efforts many countries around the world have gradually introduced an annual Holocaust Remembrance Day, celebrated with a state-sponsored memorial ceremony. How do these transnational top-down politics of memory translate into the designated national settings? Does promoting public awareness and remembrance of the Holocaust affect societies' understandings, attitudes and responses towards past and current forms of mass violence and human rights violations? Preliminary findings of two case studies - Turkey and Spain- will be presented.


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            Professor Alejandro Baer is an associate professor at the sociology department and the director of CHGS.
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            Yagmur Karakaya is a PhD student at the sociology department at the University of Minnesota. She is interested in collective memory, popular culture and narratives of history. Yagmur is currently working on her dissertation project on Ottomania, which focuses on the contemporary interest in the Ottoman past in Turkey. She also works with Alejandro Baer on a comparative study of Holocaust remembrance initiatives.
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          • Chinese Scholar to give talk April 13: "Jews in Modern China"

            Xu Xin (Nanjing University, China), "Jews in Modern China"
            Monday, April 13, 5:00pm
            3M Auditorium
            Carlson School of Management
            University of Minnesota
            Register here

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            China's premier Judaic scholar, Xu Xin (徐新) is the Diane and Guilford Glazer Chair Professor of Jewish and Israel Studies and Dean of the Institute of Jewish/Israel Studies at Nanjing University, China. He is President of the China Judaic Studies Association and Editor-in-Chief and a major contributor of the Chinese edition of Encyclopedia Judaica. He is author of Anti-Semitism: How and Why, A History of Western Culture and The Jews of Kaifeng, China: History, Culture, and Religion. He has served as a fellow or visiting scholar at Hebrew Union College, Harvard University, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Bar-Ilan University, and Tel Aviv University.
            This lecture is part of the exhibit, Jewish Refugees in Shanghai (1933-1941), a collaborative community effort to share information about the unique experiences of Jewish refugees in Shanghai during World War II. The cornerstone of this project is a historical exhibit curated by the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum and on display at Sabes JCC and St. Paul JCC. The exhibit has been enhanced with additional stories from four "Shanghailanders" with deep Minnesota connections.
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          • Yehudit Shendar: World-leading expert in Holocaust art and Nazi art plundering at the Weisman on April 14, 2015


            Yehudit Shendar 
             Retired Deputy Director and Senior Art Curator, Yad Vashem
            "The Insatiable Pursuit of Art: Nazi Art Looting - Perpetrators, Victims, Provenance Researchers"

            April 14, 2015
            7:00 pm
            Weisman Art Museum





            In describing the plunder of art by the Third Reich in his book Nazi Looting, Gerald Aalders writes: "Never in history has a collection so great been amassed with so little scruple."

            The massive looting continues to resound in the frequent headlines of the world press, which report on the efforts of Jewish Holocaust victims' heirs to regain possession of the property stolen from their families. In November 2013 a cache of 1400 works of art was seized by the Bavarian internal revenue authorities from the apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of one of four art dealers allowed under the Nazis to trade modern art. Yehudit Shendar, a world leading expert in Holocaust Art and Nazi art plundering, was selected as an appointee to an international task force assigned to research the provenance of these recently-discovered works.

            In her lecture at the Weisman Art Museum, attended by over 180 friends and scholars in the community, Yehudit Shendar shared perspectives, insights and personal accounts of her work in what was coined by Jonathan Petropoulos, a professor of history at Claremont McKenna College, as "The most important discovery of Nazi-looted art since the Allies discovered the hoards in the salt mines and the castles."








            Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies with support from the Weisman Museum of Art and the Department of Art History. Cosponsored by the Center for Austrian Studies, the Center for German and European Studies, Center for Jewish Studies, and Hillel: The Jewish Student Center.
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          • Call for Nominations: 2015 Human Rights Awards

            2015awards.pngEach spring, the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies celebrate the tremendous work of students in human rights with the Inna Meiman Award and the Sullivan Ballou Award. Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to nominate an undergraduate student who has truly been impressive in their human rights work. Self-nominations are also accepted. The awards will be given out at a luncheon ceremony on Friday, May 8th.

            Applications and Nominations due April 15th at 5pm.

            Letters of nomination (750 words or less) and résumé/CV should be submitted by email to the Human Rights Program hamm0229@umn.edu or delivered to the Human Rights Program office 214 Social Sciences. Self-nominations must include a letter of recommendation.

            For more information please call 612.626.7947 or email hamm0229@umn.edu.

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          • "Intersectional Objects" that bind and divide communities: curating an exhibit of Polish-made figurines depicting Jews

            Erica Lehrer, University of Concordia, Motreal
            Curating Memories in Conflict: New Ethnography in an Old Museum

            Monday, April 20, 2015
            12:00 - 1:30pm
            Weisman Art Museum
            free and open to the public

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            Anthropologist Erica Lehrer will discuss a participatory exhibition of Polish-made figurines depicting Jews that she curated in Kraków's Seweryn Udziela Ethnographic Museum in summer 2013. The exhibit grew out of research for her recent book Jewish Poland Revisited: Heritage Tourism in Unquiet Places (Indiana, 2013). In the broadest terms, the exhibition took up the question of how to deal with painfully disputed subject matter: How can one productively exhibit objects whose existence or the meanings one community promotes are deeply objectionable to another community? Lehrer will discuss Poland's Jewish figurines as "intersectional objects" that both bind and divide communities, and suggest their potential as catalysts for critical memory work that transcends the terms of today's defensive public debate about Poland's Jewish past. She will also address Poland's changing museum landscape as a barometer of a disputed national imaginary.

            Erica Lehrer is an Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in the departments of History and Sociology‑Anthropology at Concordia University, Montreal. She is the author of Jewish Poland Revisited: Heritage Tourism in Unquiet Places, and co‑editor of Jewish Space in Contemporary Poland, and Curating Difficult Knowledge: Violent Pasts in Public Places. As a curator, she produced the 2013 exhibit Souvenir, Talisman, Toy: Poland's Jewish Figurines in Kraków's Seweryn Udziela Ethnographic Museum, and published the accompanying catalog Lucky Jew.

            Co-sponsored by the Institute for Advanced Study, the Department of Anthropology and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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          • Talk on Jewish Heritage Revival in Poland, April 19

            Erica Lehrer, Concordia University, Montreal
            "(Polish) Gentiles Doing Jewish stuff"....and the Jews Who Love/Hate Them"

            Sunday, April 19, 2015
            7:30 - 9:00pm
            Beth Jacob Congregation

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            Jewish heritage revival in Poland is a phenomenon that has attracted a great deal of attention and provoked many controversies. Described as the world's largest Jewish cemetery and the realm of "virtual Jewishness," Poland is a space where the non-Jewish interest in things Jewish has been looked upon with particular scepticism. American cultural anthropologist Erica Lehrer ventures into this territory, both fascinating and fraught with tension, giving a fresh glimpse into the backstage of the Jewish heritage industry.
            Erica Lehrer is an Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in the departments of History and Sociology‑Anthropology at Concordia University, Montreal. She is the author of Jewish Poland Revisited: Heritage Tourism in Unquiet Places, and co‑editor of Jewish Space in Contemporary Poland, and Curating Difficult Knowledge: Violent Pasts in Public Places. As a curator, she produced the 2013 exhibit Souvenir, Talisman, Toy: Poland's Jewish Figurines in Kraków's Seweryn UdLehziela Ethnographic Museum, and published the accompanying catalog Lucky Jew.

            This series is made possible by a generous gift in memory of Julia K. & Harold Segall. Co-sponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, the Department of Anthropology; Beth Jacob Congregation.

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          • International Student Conference, "100 Years of Genocide: Remembrance, Education, Prevention"


            100 Years of Genocide
            International Student Conference

            100 Years of Genocide: Remembrance, Education, Prevention

            University of Minnesota
            Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Room 25
            April 24, 2015


            As 2015 marks the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Human Rights Program, the Institute for Global Studies, and the Ohanessian Chair hosted three days of events to commemorate this centennial. The objectives of these events are to promote public understanding of the genocide and the fates of those who lost their lives and those who escaped. The events also analyze responses by the international community, and discuss the long-term implications for international policy and actions to prevent and respond to genocide.

            The student conference brought together young scholars, graduate and advanced undergraduate students from different disciplines that are working on the Armenian or other episodes of genocide and mass violence.

            Program

            8:45 - 9:15
            Registration


            9:15 - 9:30
            Welcome

            Evelyn Davidheiser, Director, Institute for Global Studies
            Alejandro Baer, Associate Professor in Sociology, and Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

            9:30 - 11:00
            Sesssion 1


            The Armenian Genocide: Survival, Trauma, Resilience

            Professor Bedross Der Matossian, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
            (Moderator)
            Angel Amirjanyan, Yerevan State University (Armenia)
            The Psychological Effects of Genocide
            Peter Kranitz, Pazmany Peter Catholic University (Hungary)
            Survivors, Asylum Seeking and Repatriation: The case of Armenian refugees in Constantinople
            Varduhi Gumruyan, Anania Shirakatsy Lyceum Educational Complex (Armenia)
            Armenian Genocide: Consequences as Posttraumatic Stress


            11:15 - 1:00
            Session 2


            Armenians and Turkey after the Genocide

            Professor Joachim Savelsberg, University of Minnesota
            (Moderator)
            Vahram Ayvazyan (Armenia)
            Turkish Denial and Public Opinion
            Gevorg Petrosyan, National Academy of Sciences, Republic of Armenia
            "Shared Pain": Turkish Government's current steps toward denial of Armenian Genocide
            Torkom Movsesiyan, City College of New York (2009), TORKOMADA, Inc.
            The Armenian Holocaust and International Law

            1:00 - 2:00
            Lunch Break

            2:00 - 3:30
            Session 3


            Responses to Genocide: Justice, Media and Mediations

            Professor Barbara Frey
            , University of Minnesota
            (Moderator)
            Lindsay Blahnik, University of Minnesota
            Transitional Justice and Social Cohesion: effects of punitive and restorative justice on social cohesion following the Rwandan Genocide
            Tom Dunn, Exeter University (U.K.)
            Rethinking British Perceptions of Genocide and Mass Atrocities: The Sierra Leonean Civil War and Britain, 1997-2002
            Rebecca Shnabel, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse
            Traversing Translation: A Reader's Response and Marxist Critique of Elie Wiesel's Un di Velt Hot Geshvign, La Nuit, and Night

            3:45 - 4:45
            Session 4


            The Causes of Genocide and its Prevention
            Professor Alejandro Baer, University of Minnesota
            (Moderator)
            Kayla Nomina, Valparaiso University
            Patterns of the Past: Determining common causal agents of genocide to predict and
            prevent future mass atrocities

            Joe Eggers, University of Minnesota
            Native Americans and Armenians: Exploring nationalism in genocidal violence


            4:45 - 5:00
            Concluding Remarks


            Events organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Human Rights Program, Institute for Global Studies, and Ohanessian Chair. Made possible by the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.

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          • Author event with Peter Grose and his new book on Le Chambon - sur - Lignon in WW II, "A good place to Hide"

            A Good Place to Hide
            Author Event with Peter Grose

            Monday, April 20, 7:00 - 9:00pm
            Free at the St. Paul JCC
            1375 St. Paul Ave.
            St.Paul, MN 55116

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            In a year of increased terrorism and anti-Semitism in France, we invite you to share in the remarkable story of a French village and its neighbors that saved 3500 Jews during WWII. Meet journalist Peter Grose, whose newly published tale of Le Chambon in south-central France is an uplifting account of a community coming together to do what's right.

            This event is free but registration is requested. For more information please contact Beth Friend, Adult Program Coordinator at 651-255-4735

            This program is co-sponsored by Sabes JCC of Minneapolis. Community Partners: Beth Jacob Congregation, Mount Zion Temple, Temple of Aaron.

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          • Professor of Middle East History to deliver Ohanessian Lecture on the Eve of the Centennial of the Armenian Genocide

            As part of CHGS events in commemoration of the centennial of the Armenian Genocide.

            Thursday, April 23, 7:00pm
            Bedross Der Matossian, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
            The Armenian Genocide Historiography on the Eve of the Centennial: From Continuity to Contingency
            Humphrey Forum, Humphrey School of Public Affairs
            open to the public


            One of the outstanding issues in Armenian Genocide historiography has been the inability of historians to come to a consensus regarding the causes, the aim of the perpetrators, and the process of the genocide. This is due to the fact that the field of genocide studies by its nature is contentious. While most Western and some Turkish scholars agree to the fact that the events that happened to the Armenians during World War I constitute genocide, they tend to disagree on critical issues such as the causes, motives, premeditation, and the actual process itself. Over the course of the past two decades, the historiography of the Armenian Genocide has evolved through the introduction of new methodologies, approaches, and more complex analyses of the Genocide that venture beyond rudimentary and essentialist arguments and representations. These approaches range from arguing that religion and/or nationalism were the main factors that led to the Armenian Genocide, to the argument that the genocide was a contingent event that took place during World War I, represented by a rapid radicalization of the government's policy towards the Armenians. This talk will discuss the development of the historiography of the Armenian Genocide by concentrating on some of the major trends in the historiography and assess their contribution to the understanding of the different dimensions of the genocide. Furthermore, it will provide suggestions about strengthening certain areas in the historiography that still remain in their infancy.

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            Bedross Der Matossian is an Assistant Professor of Modern Middle East History in the Department of History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Born and raised in Jerusalem, he is a graduate of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he began his graduate studies in the Department of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies. He completed his Ph.D. in Middle East History in the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University in 2008. From 2008 to 2010, he was a Lecturer of Middle East History in the Faculty of History at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For the Spring quarter 2014 he was appointed as the Dumanian Visiting Professor in the University of Chicago. His areas of interest include ethnic politics in the Middle East, inter-ethnic violence in the Ottoman Empire, the history of the Armenian Genocide and modern Armenian history. In addition to contributing to numerous edited volumes, his articles have also appeared in the Journal of Palestinian Studies, Jerusalem Quarterly, Armenian Review, Majallat al-Dirasat Al-Filastiniyya, European Journal of Turkish Studies, Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal, Journal of the Society for Armenian Studies, Turcica, and Ararat Quarterly. He is the author of Shattered Dreams of Revolution: From Liberty to Violence in the Late Ottoman Empire (Stanford University Press, 2014).



            Organized by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair, Professor Joachim J. Savelsberg.
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          • HGMV workshop on Latin American Media as a Transitional Justice Memory Merchandiser

            FRIDAY, April 3, 12:00 NOON
            Social Sciences 710
            Amy Cosimini
            "Truths Produced and Sold: Latin American Media as a Transitional Justice Memory Merchandiser"

            This project explores the potential of cultural productions to act as supplementary transitional justice mechanism, which (re-) frame how nations remember past human rights abuses. Through a comparative analysis of 21st century cultural production in Argentina and Brazil, it is argued that representative films and television programs are uniquely placed to complement and question institutional memory policies that tend to monumentalize one truth and one past in an attempt to construct a coherent collective memory narrative. Drawing from human rights, media studies and transitional justice scholarship, this project promises to open up a space for a discussion on the constructed nature of memories and the media's intentions as a new structural memory frame.
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            Amy Cosimini is a PhD candidate in the department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies at the University of Minnesota where she researches the relationship between human rights and memory production discourses in Southern Cone literature and popular culture. She previously earned her B.A in Political Science and Latin American Studies at Macalester College and her M.A. in Hispanic Literature and Culture at the University of Minnesota.
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          • WWI and the Armenian Genocide Teacher Workshop, April 25

            As part of CHGS events in commemoration of the centennial of the Armenian Genocide, this day workshop will start with an historical overview of the beginning of World War 1 and be followed by break out sessions on the War in Africa, Asia, and the Armenian Genocide. Participants will be able to choose sessions of interest. Participants will receive lunch, parking, resource lists and a book. Faculty members from the Center of Austrian Studies, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and the Department of History from the University of Minnesota will be leading the sessions.
            Registration is full.

            Saturday, April 25, 8:45am - 3:00pm
            "World War I and the Armenian Genocide" Teacher Workshop
            1210 Heller Hall





            Schedule

            8:45-9:00
            Registration

            9:00-9:15
            Welcome
            Deborah Jane, Outreach Coordinator, Institute for Global Studies
            Gary Cohen, Director of the Center for Austrian Studies
            Alejandro Baer, Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies


            9:15-10:45
            Introductory Session
            The Coming of the War: Lives on the Home Front
            Gary Cohen

            10:45-11:00
            Coffee break

            11:00-12:15
            Concurrent sessions
            The War in the Colonies: Africa (Room 1210)
            Adam Blackler and Patricia Lorcin
            The Armenian Genocide (Room 1219)
            Bedross Der Matossian

            12:15-1:00
            Lunch

            1:00 -2:15
            Concurrent sessions
            The War in the Colonies: India and Southeast Asia (Room 1210)
            Ajay Skaria and Patricia Lorcin
            Minnesotans and the Armenian Genocide: History and Memory (Room 1219)
            Lou Ann Matossian

            2:15-2:30
            Coffee break

            2:30-3:00
            Concluding remarks and resources

            Events organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, and Institute for Global Studies. Made possible by the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.


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          • A Review of "Contested Past, Contested Present: Social Memories and Human Rights in Post-Communist Europe"

            An international symposium on "Contested Past, Contested Present: Social Memories and Human Rights in Post-Communist Europe" took place at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities on March 4-6. It was organized by the IAS Collaborative "Reframing Mass Violence", and sponsored by the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, among other supporters.

            The symposium opened with a keynote lecture by Prof. John-Paul Himka, who spoke about the reception of the Holocaust in post-Communist Europe, especially its legacies in Poland and Ukraine. On Thursday and Friday, sessions covered different aspects of contested memories in post-Communist European countries, from depictions in theater, museums, and film, to transitional justice policies, and the current conflict in Ukraine. The symposium also held a session on the Ukraine conflict, where professors John-Paul Himka, George O. Liber and J. Brian Atwood addressed the different aspects of the current events.

            Himka spoke about the role of the regional specifics of Ukraine, and historical differences between them, while Liber addressed Vladimir Putin's response to the Ukrainian Revolution of 2013-2015 and Russia's current aggressive foreign policy in the region. Atwood provided an informative view on the current crisis from a U.S. perspective, based on many years of experience in various state institutions, including USAID. The presentations and ensuing discussions illustrated that the past of post-Communist states remains, indeed, a contested space, negotiating narratives of rising nationalism, victimhood, responsibility, retribution and rehabilitation.
            Overall, the event foregrounded issues of how long a transition lasts, what are ways contested pasts are conceptualized and dealt with, legally, commemoratively, and artistically, and how memories can be and are at times used for political purposes. The symposium also highlighted a need to balance contested memories, interpretations of the past with long-term policies that are not merely cosmetic and mechanistic, but often demand a true reevaluation of a country's history. However, this demands interest and a willingness to do so by the communities in the states themselves. Arguably, the race for EU accession and externally shaped Transitional Justice policies may have resulted in speedy formal establishment of institutions to this effect, but equally seems to have in some instances created a space for hegemonic and reductionist narratives to take hold.
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          • "Shanghailanders" Jewish Refugees in China Exhibit at the Sabes: A Journey of Hope for more than 18,000 Jews

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            Through May 7
            Sabes JCC
            4330 S. Cedar Lake Road, Minneapolis
            Exhibit open Mon-Thu, 7:30am-9:30pm; Fri, 7:30am-6:00pm; and Sun, 8:00am-3:00pm (closed Saturdays).


            Jewish Refugees in Shanghai (1933-1941) is a collaborative community effort to share information about the unique experiences of Jewish refugees in Shanghai during World War II. The cornerstone of this project is a historical exhibit curated by the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum. The exhibit has been enhanced with additional stories from four "Shanghailanders" with deep Minnesota connections.
            See the CHGS website for a narrative of Jewish refugee Susan Muller, who journeyed from Vienna to Shanghai to Toronto.
            Sponsored by: Confucius Institute at the University of Minnesota, Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas, and Sabes JCC.
            Additional support from the Jewish Community Center of the Greater St. Paul Area, and University of Minnesota partners the Center for Jewish Studies, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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          • HGMV Workshop: "An Upheaval of Memory: The Collision of Dutch Resistance Literature and National History"

            Thursday, March 26, 3:00pm
            Social Sciences 710
            Jazmine Contreras
            "An Upheaval of Memory: The Collision of Dutch Resistance Literature and National History"


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            This paper examines the Dutch experience of German occupation during World War II through the use of memoirs. These memoirs, written by individuals with firsthand experiences of the occupation, shed light upon the categories of victim, bystander, and collaborator, which tend to be overemphasized when discussing wartime activity. Part of the paper is dedicated to problematizing these categories, especially when they obfuscate wartime experiences that do not fit neatly within the narratives created by the Dutch government. The second half of the paper, examines the memoirs in the context of government narratives which state that the Dutch were simultaneously heroes and victims during the occupation. Despite the explicit overgeneralization of this narrative, its power over Dutch memory of WWII has not diminished. Within academic circles, historians and social scientists alike have debated how to characterize the efforts of the Dutch population in light of the deportation of a majority of the Jewish population. The government has also shied away from engaging with this reality and the rampant anti-Semitism that took place after liberation.

            Jazmine is a second year PhD student in the History Department at the University of Minnesota. Her work focuses on gender and sexuality in the German-occupied Netherlands during World War II, specifically fraternization between German soldiers and Dutch women.

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          • "Despite The Holocaust: Rebuilding Jewish Life In Germany After 1945"

            Please join us for Andrea Sinn's talk "Despite The Holocaust: Rebuilding Jewish Life In Germany After 1945."

            She will discuss the experiences of Jewish communities in postwar Germany and the process of redefining Jewish existence in "the land of the perpetrators." The competing and conflicting German, Jewish, and international conceptions of Jewish life in Germany that were voiced during the early postwar years play an important role in understanding the development of individual Jewish communities in the Federal Republic and the position that German-Jewish organizations occupy within Germany and the Jewish community in Europe today.

            Despite The Holocaust: Rebuilding Jewish Life In Germany After 1945
            Wednesday, March 25 at 5:00 pm
            135 Nicholson Hall


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            Andrea Sinn is the DAAD Professor of German & History at the University of California at Berkeley. Her research and teaching focus on modern European history especially German, Jewish, and migration history. She has published widely on German-Jewish experiences during the Nazi-Dictatorship, personal and collective challenges of exile and return, as well as the rebuilding of Jewish life in the Federal Republic of Germany.

            Sponsors:
            Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch
            Center for Jewish Studies
            Center for German & European Studies

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          • April 10, "A Usable Body: Coaxing the Body Into and Out of Captivity at Black History Museums"

            Friday, April 10
            12:15 PM - 1:30 PM
            1114 Social Sciences
            *Free*
            RSVP REQUIRED to marydrew@umn.edu

            Sociology Workshop Series Presents:

            Robyn Autry, Wesleyan University
            "A Usable Body: Coaxing the Body Into and Out of Captivity at Black History Museums"


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            The visual logic of 'black' identity as a social and historical fact is visible at museum exhibitions depicting the transformation of enslaved Africans to racial citizens. In particular, Professor Autry will focus on the work of the body in narrating this transition at the first black history museum: the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan. She identifies two types of body work: that of the historical object on display - the captive African and the US citizen - along with that of the visitor moving through the physical space of the museum. In the first instance, she considers the visual treatment of the enslaved body in captivity as broken, bowed, beaten and often nude in contrast to the post-abolition period when the body is positioned as erect, individuated, self-possessed and always clothed (even as its body ironically disappears in the process of becoming a subject). During both periods, normative presentations of the body mimic the moral underpinnings of black history as a site of knowledge production and identity.
            Building on this, Professor Autry considers how the visitor's body is oriented both to the narratives on display and to the built environment of the museum itself. Just as the transition from slavery to citizenship is materialized through images of poised, able bodies, she argues that the museum works to construct visitors as similarly poised and able-bodied subjects. These problematic around subject-object relations illustrate that spectatorship cannot be divorced from the racialized imagination that produces and then privileges certain forms of embodied subjecthood over others.
            (Continue Reading)
          • On view at the WAM: Selections from the Struggle series by artist raised in Hungary in WWII

            Selections from the Struggle series
            SATURDAY, FEB 14 2015 - SUNDAY, MAR 22 2015
            Weisman Art Museum

            Peter Dallos: Selections from The Struggle series is concerned with two elemental conflicts that affect humankind: one struggle is the tension between Western civilization and the forces of nihilism and anarchy, the other is environmental destruction versus the reaction of the wounded earth.

            Peter Dallos's early work (the War series) was autobiographical, mostly concerning his World War II experiences as a child during the German occupation, the bombardment and siege of Budapest, and the Holocaust. The entire War series is in the permanent collection of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

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            Dallos is a self-taught artist and John Evans Professor Emeritus of Neuroscience at Northwestern University. As a young teenager, he studied painting in Budapest with György Kádár, one of Hungary's foremost artists. He also learned there the machining and tool and die-making skills that form the mechanical foundation of these works.
            Dallos's adolescence was spent under the Hungarian fascist regime and later under the Soviet occupation. He escaped and immigrated to the United States after the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.
            (Continue Reading)
          • International Symposium: Social Memories and Human Rights in Post-Communist Europe (March 4-6)

            The international symposium coordinated by the IAS collaborative, Reframing Mass Violence, examined the dynamics of public remembrance in post-communist Europe. The keynote address was by John-Paul Himka, Professor of History and Classics, University of Alberta. In case you missed it, or would like to review, links to videos below.

            March 4, Wednesday
            Keynote Address: "Bringing the Dark Past to Light:
            The Reception of the Holocaust in Post-Communist Europe"

            John-Paul Himka
            7:30 p.m.
            Best Buy Theater, Northrop
            Welcome: Barbara Frey (Co-Chair of IAS Collaborative)
            Introduction: Evelyn Davidheiser (University of Minnesota)


            Despite the Holocaust's profound impact on the history of Eastern Europe, the communist regimes successfully repressed public discourse about and memory of this tragedy. Since the collapse of communism in 1989, however, this has changed. Professor Himka discusses recent political, social, and cultural developments that have facilitated a more nuanced and complex understanding of the continuities and discontinuities in representations of the Holocaust and the role that memory plays in contemporary discussions of national identity in Eastern Europe.

            March 5, Thursday
            Location: 1210 Heller Hall, 271 19th Avenue S, Minneapolis


            9:00 - 9:30 AM
            Welcome and Introductory Remarks
            CLA Dean John Coleman
            Alejandro Baer (Co-Chair of IAS Collaborative)

            9:30 - 11:30 AM
            Session 1: Competing Images of the Past: Stalinism vs. Nazism
            Lars Breuer (Free University of Berlin): "Victimhood in Vernacular Memory in Germany and Poland"
            Matti Jutila (University of Minnesota): "Constructing Genocidal Marxism in Post-Communist Europe"
            Respondent: Alejandro Baer (University of Minnesota)

            1:30 - 3:30 PM
            Session 2: Accounting for the Past: Truth and Justice in the former Yugoslavia
            Sarah Wagner (George Washington University): "Recognizing Srebrenica's Missing: The Sociopolitics of Forensic Intervention"
            Jelena Subotic (Georgia State University): "The Mythologizing of Communist Violence"
            Thomas C. Wolfe (University of Minnesota): "History, Truth, and Method: Comments on Forensics and Justice"
            Respondent: Barbara Frey (University of Minnesota)
            4:00 - 5:45 PM
            Session 3: The Ukraine Conflict: Contested Past, Contested Present
            An IAS "Thursdays at Four" event
            John-Paul Himka (University of Alberta): "The History behind the Regional Conflict in Ukraine"
            George O. Liber (University of Alabama - Birmingham): "The Ukrainian Revolution of 2013-2015 and the Russian Response."
            J. Brian Atwood (University of Minnesota): "The US perspective on the Regional Conflict."
            Respondent: Mary Curtin (University of Minnesota)
            March 6, Friday
            Location: 1210 Heller Hall, 271 19th Avenue S, Minneapolis

            9:00 - 11:00 AM
            Session 4: Law and Memory in Transition
            Ryan Moltz (University of Minnesota): "Lustration in the Former Yugoslavia"
            Adam Czarnota (IISL, Spain): "Law as Mnemosyne Married with Lethe: Quasi-judicial institutions and collective memories"
            Nadya Nedelsky (Macalester College): "The Struggle for the Memory of the Nation: Slovakia's Confrontation with its Competing Pasts"
            Respondent: Joachim Savelsberg (Co-Chair of IAS Collaborative)
            11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
            Session 5: The Arts and the Politics of Representation
            Michal Kobialka (University of Minnesota): "Of Contested Pasts and Contested Presents: Tadeusz Kantor's Theatre and the Politics of Representation"
            Margarita Kompelmakher (University of Minnesota): "Universality from the Margin? Performing the Explicit Body in the Belarus Free Theater's Trash Cuisine"
            Respondent: James Dawes (Macalester College)
            Sponsored by the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Cosponsored by the Institute for Advanced Study, the Institute for Global Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, Department of Political Science, Department of History, Center for Jewish Studies, European Studies Consortium and the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.
            (Continue Reading)
          • Violent Action and Body Knowledge: A Sociological Perspective on Torture

            "Violent Action and Body Knowledge:
            A Sociological Perspective on Torture"

            Tuesday, March 10, 4pm
            1114 Social Sciences
            CHGS Lecture, co-sponsored with the Department of Sociology and the Human Rights Program


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            Katharina Inhetveen
            Sociology Chair, Siegen University, Germany



            The lecture will explore torture, as a case of systematized violent action, using analytical instruments informed by the sociology of the body and the sociology of knowledge. The focus is on relations between torture practices and body knowledge. It is argued that the differences as well as the similarities between specific cases of torture, treated in a comparative perspective, can be better understood by taking into account not only the actual torture practices themselves, but also their interconnectedness with body knowledge and body images as socio-cultural constructions. Professor Inhetveen will discuss how violent action and body knowledge mutually influence, shape and reshape each other.

            (Continue Reading)
          • HGMV Workshop

            Thursday, March 12
            3:00pm
            710 Social Sciences
            Orry Klainman (Department of History)
            "Jewish DP Immigration Desires after World War II"

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            Orry Klainman is a Ph.D. student in the History Department at the University of Minnesota. Previously he completed a master's degree in Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Chicago. His work focuses on the intellectual and cultural history of the modern Middle East with a particular emphasis on moments of popular violence and insurgency.

            The larger project of Klainman's M.A. thesis was concerned with the strength and application of Zionist rhetoric focused on European Jewish immigration to Palestine. While researching this subject Klainman came across an archive of interviews conducted by a psychology professor from Chicago's Illinois Institute of Technology named David Boder. In 1946, Boder interviewed 118 people, most of them Jewish "displaced persons," making him arguably the first person to record oral histories from Jewish survivors. In going through Boder's interviews, Klainman recorded important information from each one and ended up with some interesting data. Klainman will share information about the immigration desires of displaced Jews after World War II.


            (Continue Reading)
          • Call for Applications: Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies

            The University of Minnesota Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Department of History invite applications from current doctoral students in the UMN College of Liberal Arts for the Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies for the academic year 2015-16.

            The Badzin Fellowship will pay a stipend of $18,000, the cost of tuition and health insurance, and $1,000 toward the mandatory graduate student fees. All application materials must be received by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies electronically at chgs@umn.edu, no later than 3:00 pm on Friday, March 13, 2015.


            Eligibility:
            An applicant must be a full-time student in a Ph.D. program in the College of Liberal Arts, currently enrolled in the first, second, third, or fourth year of study, and have a doctoral dissertation project in Holocaust and/or genocide studies.
            The fellowship will be awarded on the basis of the quality and scholarly potential of the dissertation project, the applicant's quality of performance in the graduate program, and the applicant's general scholarly promise.
            The Badzin Fellowship is an exclusive award. It may not be held concurrently with another award or teaching responsibilities.
            Required application materials:
            1) A letter of application (maximum 4 pages single-spaced) describing the applicant's intellectual interests and dissertation research and the research and/or writing which the applicant expects to do during the fellowship year
            2) A current curriculum vitae for the applicant
            3) An unofficial transcript of all graduate work done at the University of Minnesota
            4) TWO confidential letters of recommendation from U of MN faculty, discussing the quality of the applicant's graduate work and dissertation project and the applicant's progress toward completing the degree, sent directly to the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
            (Continue Reading)
          • Amber Michel to present at first HGMV workshop of the spring semester

            "American Islamic Organizations: Response Narrative to Counterterrorism Initiatives."
            Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies Interdisciplinary Graduate workshop
            Thursday, February 5
            3:00 P.M.
            Room 710 Social Sciences

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            Amber Michel is a graduate student in the interdisciplinary Master of Liberal Studies program at the University of Minnesota. Her current research examines how counterterrorism initiatives impact Muslim organizations in America. Ms. Michel is especially interested in how the pressure of policing destabilizes Islamic civil society in the US. She works extensively with local Muslim communities on issues of civil rights, law enforcement and discrimination.



            The workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process, and to engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
            For more information please contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
            Schedule for 2015: HGMVWorkshopSpring2015Dates-2 (1).pdf
            (Continue Reading)
          • Next HGMV Workshop: Erma Nezirevic

            Thursday, February 26, 3pm
            710 Social Sciences
            Erma Nezirevic: "Spain Interrupted: Examining Spanish Representations of Violence in the Former Yugoslavia"

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            Erma Nezirevic is a Ph.D. candidate in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities. She specializes in 20th and 21st century Iberian literatures and cultures. Her dissertation studies the way Spain evokes the Balkan Wars of the 1990s in literature and other cultural production such as photography, and how in turn that provides a political, social and cultural understanding of Spain itself. Erma currently works in affiliation with the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, where she coordinates the HGMV Workshop.



            The workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process, and to engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
            For more information please contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
            Schedule for 2015: HGMVWorkshopSpring2015Dates-2 (1).
            (Continue Reading)
          • Bearing Witness 70 Years after the Liberation of Auschwitz

            Featuring Artist Felix de la Concha's
            "Portraits and Conversations with Survivors of the Shoah"
            A multi-media art project that delves into the act of bearing witness
            5:00p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
            Weisman Art Museum
            Monday, January 26, 2015

            Free and open to the public reservations required
            Please make your reservations by clicking here or calling the event line at
            612-424-3624. Parking available in the Weisman Art Musem garage.

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            The Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies and its campus and community partners invite you to a special evening of events to mark the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.


            CHGS will unveil the eight Minnesotan portraits of the forty overall paintings done for the "Portraits & Conversations with Survivors of the Shoah" project we coordinated with artist Felix de la Concha. The evening will also include a reception, remarks from Steve Hunegs, Executive Director, Jewish Community Relations Council, a talk from Auschwitz survivor Dora Zaidenweber, and an interview and Q&A with Felix de la Concha conducted by Professor Leslie Morris, Department of German, Scandinavian and Dutch.
            "Portraits& Conversations" was conceived by De la Concha, in 2007 when he began to paint portraits of Holocaust survivors from all over the world. While posing, the survivors talked about their lives and shared their testimonies of survival. These intimate sessions were recorded so we can see the transformation from a blank canvas to a finished piece. In February of 2013 eight Holocaust survivors who reside in Minnesota participated in the project. There are now 40 completed portraits available to view in the virtual museum on the CHGS website. In addition to the paintings, CHGS also has the video and audio recordings of the sessions, which are on our YouTube channel.
            This project was made possible in part with the support of Rimon: The Minnesota Jewish Arts Council, an initiative of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation and the Wexler Special Events Fund for Holocaust & Genocide Studies.
            University of Minnesota partners: The Institute for Global Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies, the Center for German and European Studies, the Center for Austrian Studies, Department of Art History, the Department of History, the Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch, the Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Department of Sociology, Department of French & Italian, the Human Rights Program, the European Studies Consortium, Minnesota Hillel.
            Community: The Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas (JCRC), Children of Holocaust Survivors Association in Minnesota (CHAIM), Center for Holocaust & Genocide Education, St. Cloud State University.
            CHGS_Poster_1218f.pdf
            (Event covered by MPR)
            (Continue Reading)
          • New Topics course on 100th Anniversary of Armenian Genocide announced for Spring 2015

            The Armenian Genocide: Disrupted History, Fractured Identities
            Global Studies 5900-Sec. 003
            Bi-weekly: Thursday's 1:30 to 3:00 p.m.
            1 credit advanced seminar
            Dr. Artyom H. Tonoyan, Baylor University

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            The course will explore the socio-historical dimensions of the Armenian Genocide and the contemporary effects of its denial on Armenian and Turkish societies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the rise of Turkish nationalism, the structure of the Armenian Genocide, particularly its social and ideological components, and the efforts to deal with the fallout of the extermination of the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire.


            A Native of Armenia, Dr. Artyom H. Tonoyan received his Ph.D. from
            Baylor University in 2012, where he completed his dissertation on the religious aspects of the conflict in Nagorno Karabakh. Additionally he taught ethno-political conflicts and international human rights at Baylor University before relocating to Minneapolis. His current research includes the politics of the memory of the Armenian Genocide, religion and nationalism in the Caucasus, and the de-secularization of contemporary Russian politics.
            Sponsored by the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies and the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair
            (Continue Reading)
          • 100 Years of Genocide: Student Conference Call for Papers

            As we approach the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Human Rights Program and the Institute for Global Studies will be hosting three days of events to commemorate this centennial. The events will include the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Lecture featuring Professor Bedros Der Matossian, which is open to the public (April 23), a student conference, entitled "One Hundred Years of Genocide" (April 24) and a K-16 teacher workshop (April 25). The objectives of these events are to promote public understanding of the genocide and the fates of those who lost their lives and those who escaped. The events will also analyze responses by the international community (and/or lack thereof), and discuss the long-term implications for international policy and actions to prevent and respond to genocide. In addition to these events the Armenian Community of Minnesota will also be commemorating the genocide with there own special programming.

            The student conference seeks to bring together graduate and advanced undergraduate students from different disciplines that are working on the Armenian or other episodes of genocide and mass violence.To this end, we are seeking a broad range of papers that examine but are not limited to the following topics:
            The Armenian Genocide: Historical and socio-political paths leading to the genocide; the role of the international community, testimonials of survivors; public memory; etc.
            Genocide and the international community: Intervention or lack thereof in genocides and large-scale political violence; potential responses to genocide and mass violence; the role of neighboring countries, and other countries.
            Genocide and the media: International and local media coverage of genocide; hate media and genocide incitement; representations of mass violence and its (cognitive and ethical) limits; representations in popular media such as movies, documentaries, music etc.
            Representing mass atrocity before Lemkin: the Armenian genocide has been referred to as a Crime with no name because it occurred before the Genocide Convention. How does this fact affect how we understand and talk about mass atrocities that occurred before December 9th 1948, including the Armenian genocide?
            Genocide Awareness and Advocacy in the Age of Digital Communications: Social media campaigns to promote awareness and response, traditional vs. new technology platforms to document genocide and mass violence, affect organization and mobilization of citizens, etc.
            Justice and politics of reconciliation after genocide: The role and effectiveness of judicial processes and transitional justice mechanisms such as International Tribunals, truth commissions and reparations.
            Genocide education and public memory: Teaching about genocide and mass atrocities; the representation of the Armenian genocide in history and other textbooks. Memorials, museums and commemoration days/weeks; the politics of commemoration; the use of human remains in memorials and related issues.
            Abstracts not exceeding 300 words and a 2 page CV should be sent to Wahutu j. Siguru Siguru@umn.edu by the 15th of January 2015.
            The conference was made possible by funding from the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies at The Minneapolis Foundation and is sponsored by The Institute for Global Studies, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair, and the Human Rights Program at the University of Minnesota.
            (Continue Reading)
          • Twin Cities Premier of Watchers of the Sky

            Tuesday, December 9
            7:00-9:00 pm
            William Mitchell College of Law
            Presented by World Without Genocide

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            Open to the public, no reservations necessary. $10 general public, $5 students and seniors. Free to Mitchell students.
            $35 2 standard CLE credits, $35 2 POST credits, 2 educator clock hours.

            Watchers of the Sky interweaves four stories of remarkable courage, compassion, and determination, while setting out to uncover the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin - the man who created the word "genocide," and believed the law could protect the world from mass atrocities. Inspired by Samantha Power's Pulitzer Prize-winning book, A Problem From Hell, Watchers of the Sky takes you on a provocative journey from Nuremberg to The Hague, from Bosnia to Darfur, from criminality to justice, and from apathy to action.
            Watch the trailer by clicking here.
            Co-sponsors: The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Human Rights Program, University of Minnesota State Bar Association Human Rights Committee,
            Congregation Shir Tikvah, Minneapolis; Mt. Zion Temple, St. Paul, United Nations Association of Minnesota; and William Mitchell College of Law.
            (Continue Reading)
          • "Genocide in El Salvador: Where Ethnicity and Politics Collided"

            Paula Cuellar Cuellar, Department of History and Badzin Fellow in Holocaust and Genocide Studies
            HGMV Workshop
            Friday, December 5
            12:00p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences Building

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            The HGMV workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process, and to engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
            For more information contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
            (Continue Reading)
          • Bystanders, Rescuers or Perpetrators? The Neutrals and the Shoah-Facts, Myths and Counter Myths Conference in Madrid, Spain

            The international conference will be held at Centro Sefarad-Israel in Madrid, Spain on November 24 and 26 and will aim at addressing the following issues: The neutral countries' reactions to Nazi anti-Jewish policies and their own policies on Jewish refugees;Their response to the German ultimatum of 1943 to either repatriate Jews with citizenship from their respective countries who lived in Nazi-occupied Europe or to allow their deportation;The genesis and long-lasting effects of "rescue myths", the current state of the discussion regarding the neutral countries' positions during the Holocaust;The dealing with the history of the Jewish persecution in state fact-finding commissions and committees of historians;Approaches to Holocaust education in neutral countries.Holocaust public memory (ceremonies, memorials, museums) and memory politics in neutral countries.



            The conference will aim at addressing the following issues:
            CHGS director Alejandro Baer will introduce "The Politics of Rescue Myths. Lessons from Spain." on the panel "Rescue Myth, Public Debates, Historical Investigations."
            This conference is supported by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) and sponsored by Centro Sefarad Israel - Madrid; Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies- University of Minnesota; Mémorial de la Shoah - Paris; History Unit of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland - Berne; Topography of Terror Foundation - Berlin; Living History Forum - Stockholm; Memoshoá/Association for the Education and Remembrance of the Holocaust - Lisbon and Tarih Vakfı/History Foundation - Istanbul.
            PROGRAMME CONFERENCE ON NEUTRALS - MADRID NOV 2014 - 1610.pdf
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          • Surviving Forced Disappearance: Identity and Meaning

            A Conversation with Gabriel Gatti (Prof. of Sociology, University of the Basque Country)
            Thursday, November 20
            3:00p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences
            (Spanish with translation)

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            Due in large part to humanitarian law and transitional justice, the categories of detained-disappeared and forced disappearance are today well established - so much so that in some places like Argentina and Uruguay an intense social life has taken shape around them and in their wake. Victims mix with institutions, laws, and professionals (forensic anthropologists, social scientists, jurists, psychologists, artists, archivists, writers), occupying intersecting positions and doing so with varied narratives, from the epic and heroic to the tragic and traumatic. Based on extensive fieldwork in Argentina and Uruguay, Gatti analyzes these worlds in an attempt to understand how one inhabits the categories that international law has constructed to mark, judge, think about, and repair horror.
            Gabriel Gatti is Professor of Sociology at the University of the Basque Country, Spain. His research and teaching focus on contemporary forms of identity, in particular those constituted in situations of social catastrophe, rupture, and fracture. He is the author of Identidades débiles, Identidades desaparecidas, Les nouveaux répères de l'identité collective en Europe, and Basque society. His latest work, Surviving Forced Disappearance in Argentina and Uruguay: Identity and Meaning was published in august of 2014. He is also a main researcher behind the Mundo(s) de victimas (World(s) of victims) a study of four cases that deal with the construction of the "victim" category in contemporary Spain.
            Professor Gatti's visit is part of the Reframing Mass Violence Collaborative Series. Sponsored by the Institute for Advanced Studies, The Human Rights Program, the Department of Sociology and CHGS.
            (Continue Reading)
          • 2013-2014 Annual Report available online

            The CHGS annual report is now available in PDF on our website. The report includes highlights of programs, events and articles that took place in the last year. To directly view the report click here.

            (Continue Reading)
          • Humanizing Narco Violence in Mexico

            Professor Patrick McNamara
            HGMV Workshop
            Thursday, November 13
            3:00p.m.
            Room 710
            Social Sciences Building

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            Professor McNamara will provide workshop participants with small pieces he has written regarding his attempt to understand human rights violations in Mexico from the perspective of the perpetrators. The essay introduces ideas of memory formation and violence within the field of cognitive studies. He will speak briefly about psychological studies dealing with evil and violence and about the particular groups he has studied most in Mexico, La Familia Michoacana and Los Templarios Caballeros.

            Photo: Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images 2-16-2012

            (Continue Reading)
          • Give to the Max Day is November 13, 2014

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            Be a light for the U's Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies on Give to the Max Day.
            Make a gift at http://z.umn.edu/givechgs.


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          • The genocide of the Herero people in Namibia and the case for reparations

            A special lecture by Ester Utjiua Muinjangue MA
            Lecturer in Social Work at the University of Namibia, and Chair, Ovaherero Genocide Committee, Namibia

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            Presented by the University of Minnesota School of Social Work
            Monday, November 10, 2014
            5:30 - 7:30
            Room 5, Peters Hall
            School of Social Work
            Light dinner served at 5:30, Presentation begins at 6:00
            1.5 FREE CEUS
            RSVP to elightfo@umn.edu

            (Continue Reading)
          • From "Racial Paradise" to the Racist Anti-racism of Frente Negra Brasileira

            Satty Flaherty-Echeverría, Ph.D Candidate, Spanish and Portuguese Studies
            HGMV Workshop
            Thursday, October 30, 3:00p.m. Room 710 Social Sciences Building

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            Due to the late abolition of slavery in Brazil, in 1888, the emancipatory movements that emerged in the first decades of the twentieth century lacked the strength and the language to fight effectively for racial equality. A case in point is the Frente Negra Brasileira (FNB) [Brazilian Black Front], founded in 1931 and outlawed in 1937 by Getúlio Vargas' regime. The FNB had as its main purpose the "political and social union of the National Black People, to affirm their historical rights, in virtue of their material
            and moral activity in the past and for the revindication of their social and political rights under Brazilian communion."
            In this presentation, Flaherty-Echeverria will explore the possible reasons due to which the FNB failed to achieve its political goals. She will concentrate on identifying and analyzing what Celia M. Azevedo calls the "voice from within"1 that obstructed the Afro-centric imagination of Brazilian intellectuals of the time. Those intellectuals embraced the idea that Brazil was a "racial paradise" and, hence, an exceptional case when compared to race relations in the US.
            Satty Flaherty-Echeverria is a Ph.D student in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies at the University of Minnesota writing her dissertation on the recovery of the construction of a Black experience expressed at the margins: in the Portuguese and Spanish languages. Focusing on the poetic and prose articulations connecting African and African diasporic intellectuals across the Atlantic, particularly in Portugal, Brazil and Cuba during the two world wars, who created a network mainly based on periodical publications and translations where their creative and critical work intersected and challenged the mainstream paradigms of Pan-Africanism and Negritude though remaining outside of the debate due to the language in which they were writing."
            The HGMV workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process, and to engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
            For more information contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
            (Continue Reading)
          • Just A War Theory? American Public Attitudes on Proportionality and Distinction

            A Lecture by Benjamin Valentino
            Monday, November 3
            1:30 p.m.
            ROOM CHANGE
            50B Humphrey School of Public Affairs

            Dr. Benjamin Valentino is an Associate Professor of Government at Dartmouth College. His research interests include the causes and consequences of violent conflict and American foreign and security policies, and the causes and prevention of genocide.

            His book Final Solutions: Mass Killing and Genocide in the 20th Century won the Edgar S. Furniss Book Prize for an exceptional contribution to the study of national and international security. His work appeared in outlets such as The American Political Science Review, International Organization, The Journal of Politics, Security Studies, and World Politics, as well as The New York Times and Foreign Affairs.
            Sponsored by: the Minnesota International Relations Colloquium, the Comparative Politics Colloquium, and the Center of Holocaust & Genocide Studies
            (Continue Reading)
          • Re/Imagining PTSD: Toward a Cripistemology of Trauma

            Angela Carter, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
            HGMV Workshop
            Thursday, October 16, 3:00p.m. Room 710 Social Sciences Building

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            From news coverage to television dramas, American culture is saturated with representations of trauma. Moreover, global politics and economic policies all but ensure a future where a life structured by catastrophe can be expected.


            Carter deconstructs the ubiquity of trauma discourse, arguing for a cripistemology of trauma as a way to reconceptualize PTSD in our neoliberal landscape. Whereas theorists such as Lauren Berlant have recently rejected trauma as an analytic framework - since, as it's argued, psychic catastrophe is something we'll all experience if we live long enough - she proposes a crip approach to trauma as a crucial lens into how suffering and "crisis ordinariness" are unevenly distributed, and dissimilarly experienced, among neoliberal subjects. By cripping PTSD, it becomes possible to reimagine an approach to suffering that makes life more livable.
            Gesturing toward a larger dissertation project, she will outline three sites of inquiry within contemporary discourses of PTSD. First exploring how the post-9/11 framing of certain traumatized subjects as ideal citizen-patriots forcefully erases those that cannot be interpolated into rhetorics of U.S. exceptionalism. Secondly, examining how dominant methods of "curing" PTSD illuminate similar neoliberal undertones. Lastly, drawing on anti-psychology theorizing, offering beginning thoughts toward reimaging PTSD as an alternative, and queer, affective and temporal structure. In doing so, this paper proposes a crip way of understanding trauma - one that finds its political imperative in the pervasiveness of the discourse, and demands a theorization that imagines otherwise.
            Angela Carter is a fifth year Ph.D Student in Feminist Studies. She came to the U after becoming a Ronald E. McNair Scholar at Truman State University, and the first person in her family to graduate from college. Her academic interests include: trauma theory, disability studies, queer theory, ethnography, and critical pedagogy. Broadly speaking, her dissertation work examines the intersections of contemporary feminist praxis and critical disability studies within the academy.
            The HGMV workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process, and to engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
            For more information contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
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          • Post-graduate Symposium on Occupation, Transitional Justice and Gender

            Call for Papers and Posters
            The Transitional Justice Institute (University of Ulster) and the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (University of Ulster) invite proposals for a one-day postgraduate symposium on Occupation, Transitional Justice and Gender to be held on Friday, 8 May 2015.

            This symposium seeks to explore the interface between occupation, transitional justice and gender. The starting point for exploration is based in feminist concerns that are broadly focused on issues of power, control and hierarchies. More specifically, feminist theorizing acknowledges that women's needs during times of occupation, conflict, and/or transition are often ignored, sidelined or essentialised; recent research is also looking into masculinities during these periods. While much research has explored transitional justice and gender, there has been limited research on the relationship and complexities of occupation and gender.
            Furthermore, there is a dearth of research on how these three concepts intersect, inform and/or impact each other. Some questions to be explored during the symposium may include:
            What might be the approach in exploring the interface between occupation and transitional justice while utilizing a gendered lens?
            How does law capture modern instances of occupation that do not fit neatly into the existing legal coding?
            Can transitional justice mechanisms be employed while there is an occupation and can such mechanisms take the gendered needs of the population into account?
            Can the exceptionality of occupation reveal gender differences unapparent in normal settings and, if so, what are their implications for transitional justice theory and praxis?
            We invite papers from postgraduate students (PhD and Masters) who are exploring the above-mentioned questions in any context and any time period; case studies and theoretical papers are also welcomed. We also invite poster proposals to be featured during a special poster session. For paper or poster proposals, please send a title, a 200-word abstract, and a short one-paragraph biography by 31 December 2014 to Rimona Afana (afana-r@email.ulster.ac.uk) and Stephanie Chaban (chaban-s@email.ulster.ac.uk). Acceptance of abstracts will be notified by 15 January 2015.
            All submissions will be eligible for Best Paper and Best Poster awards. Papers will get substantive and thorough feedback from faculty with expertise in gender/transition and/or law of armed conflict. The organizers are exploring the possibility of publication for the best papers. The symposium will feature Professor Christine Chinkin, Professor of International Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science, as the keynote speaker. Gender experts from the Transitional Justice Institute and IRiSS will also participate. Furthermore, there will also be a praxis session involving domestic and international work related to women's grassroots involvement in transitional justice mechanisms. The full schedule will be announced shortly.
            While there is no registration fee, we regret that we are unable to cover travel and accommodation costs for participants.
            The symposium is sponsored by the Feminist & Women's Studies Association (FWSA): http://fwsablog.org.uk/
            Further sponsorship is provided by the Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster, the Research Graduate School, University of Ulster, and the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, University of Ulster.
            (Continue Reading)
          • The Aleph-bet as an Ontological Basis of Ethics?

            Classical Rhetorics, Technical Communication, the Holocaust, and the Object Beyond
            A conversation with Steven Katz, the R. Roy and Marnie Pearce Professor of Professional Communication, and Professor of English, at Clemson University.
            Wednesday, October 22
            125 Nolte Center
            11:30 a.m.
            Presented by the Department of Writing Studies

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            This presentation will entail discussions of rhetoric, Judaism, and philosophies of language and reality. Revisiting what he had considered to be a primary ethical problem rooted in classical Greek and Roman rhetoric, what he called "the ethic of expediency" first formalized in Aristotle's Rhetoric, Dr. Katz will touch on the apparent manifestation of this ethic in technical communication, and whether and to what degree the ethic of expediency was a major operant in the Holocaust.

            Picking up the Jewish theme, Dr. Katz will summarize an ancient philosophy of the Hebrew aleph-bet, and briefly compare this philosophy to that of classical Greek rhetoric; he will argue, as he has done in publication, that this philosophy of the Hebrew aleph-bet seems to represent a somewhat unique strand of classical rhetoric. Dr. Katz will suggest ways this Jewish sophistic relates to technical communication, and how the rhetoric of the aleph-bet may harbor or at least hint at an ontological antidote to the ethic of expediency.

            In the conclusion of his presentation, Dr. Katz will speculate about the epistemological implications of this orthographic ontology for mystical, magical, empirical, social-epistemic, deconstructive, object-oriented, and digital philosophies of communication and reality in a post-human age.

            Lunch will follow this special event. Please RSVP to Kate Gobel (kdgobel@umn.edu.)
            This lecture is sponsored by Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, The Center for Jewish Studies and the Department of English.
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          • CHGS co-sponsoring 2 films at the Twin Cities Jewish Film Festival

            CHGS will co-sponsor The German Friend and 24 Days at the 2014 Twin Cities Jewish Film Festival on November first and second, both screenings will be at the Sabes Jewish Community Center.

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            The German Friend (Der Deutsche Freund)
            Saturday, November 1
            7:30 p.m.
            Sabes Jewish Community Center
            Tickets: $10 in advance; $14 same day
            For more information or to purchase tickets click here.
            The German Friend is the story of a German-Jewish girl and the son of an exiled Nazi form an enduring bond in Argentina. Through 30 years of personal and political postwar history, the film delivers an intimate examination of a guilt-ridden generation seeking to escape the legacy of their forbearers. Director Jeanine Meerapfel tells a story of a deep love in a time of political upheaval and historical change.
            Directed by Jeanine Meerapfel; Argentina, Germany; 2012; German and Spanish with English subtitles; Adult, Nudity
            24 Days (24 Jours: La Verite sur l'affaire Ilan Halimi)
            November 2
            4:00p.m.
            Discussion to follow screening
            Sabes Jewish Community Center
            Tickets: $10 in advance; $14 same day
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            Sticking dangerously close to the real-life incident that inspired it, 24 Days offers up a white-knuckle dramatization of the nearly month-long kidnapping and torture of 23-year-old Ilan Halimi, whose traumatic ordeal at the hands of the "Gang of Barbarians" prompted a massive police manhunt and, eventually, a national outcry against anti-Semitism in France.
            Directed by Alexandre Arcady; France; 2014; English Subtitles; Mature Audiences, Content; 110 min
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          • AGMI ANNOUNCES 2015 LEMKIN SCHOLARSHIP FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS

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            The Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute announces 2015 LEMKIN SCHOLARSHIP program for foreign students and PhD candidates. Raphael Lemkin scholarship is intended to enable foreign students, who specialize in genocide studies, especially in the Armenian Genocide, to visit Armenia for a month to conduct research in local scientific institutions and libraries.



            The Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute will provide researchers possibility to carry out their research in AGMI, including necessary research materials and consultation.
            The deadline for application is on 15 December, 2014. The winner will be selected by the Scientific Council of the AGMI on 25 December, 2014.
            The beginning of the scholarship program is on 1 January, 2015. Winners are free to select a month within 2015 except January, February and December.
            The duration of the scholarship is one month.
            Winner of the Scholarship will provide article for International Journal of Armenian Genocide Studies as a result of his/her research within 6 months from the end of visit to Armenia.
            Financial support
            The AGMI will cover all travel and accommodation expenses related to the nominee. A separate funding will be provided to cover some per diem and research expanses.
            For complete details and application please click here.
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          • A Cinematic Look at Political Violence in Latin America

            Fridays, October and November 2014
            2:00-4:00p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences
            Presented by Paula Cuellar, 2014-2015 Badzin Fellow in Holocaust & Genocide Studies

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            From the dictatorships of the Southern Cone to the civil wars that took place in Central America, the selected films will provide a lens into the systematic and widespread human rights violations that were perpetrated by state authorities during the last decades of the past century. By depicting the different situations lived in Argentina, Chile, Peru, Guatemala, El Salvador, the viewers will be able to explore the darkest moments of the history of Latin America in the twentieth century through the arts. In addition to the films we will have discussions on the different implications that the particular forms of violence had for every country.



            Friday, October 10: The Official Story (Argentina, 1985): The film deals with the story of an upper middle class couple who lives in Buenos Aires with an illegally adopted child. The mother comes to realize that her daughter may be the child of a desaparecido, a victim of the forced disappearances that occurred during Argentina's last military dictatorship. Director: Luis Puenzo.
            Friday, October 17: Death and the Maiden (Chile, 1994): Paulina is a housewife married to a prominent lawyer in an unnamed South American country. One day a storm forces her husband Gerardo to ride home with a charming stranger. She is convinced that the stranger, Doctor Miranda, was part of the old fascist regime and that he tortured and raped her for weeks while she was blindfolded. Paulina takes him captive to determine the truth. Director: Roman Polanski.
            Friday, October 24: The Fall of Fujimori (Peru, 2005): The Fall of Fujimori is a character-driven, political-thriller documentary that explores the volatile events that defined Alberto Fujimori's decade-long reign of Peru. In 2000 he fled the country for Japan to avoid facing 21 charges of corruption, murder and human rights abuses. Then, five years later, Fujimori flew into Chile and declared his intention of once again running for president in 2006. This is his story. Director: Ellen Perry.
            Friday, October 31: When The Mountains Tremble (Guatemala, 1983): Documentary film produced by Skylight Pictures about the war between the Guatemalan Military and the Mayan Indigenous population of Guatemala. It narrates the story of the Guatemalan people at large, specifically the struggles of the poor and peaceful Indian population that came to be labeled "subversives" by a draconian government. Director: Pamela Yates.
            Friday, November 7: Monseñor: The Last Journey of Óscar Romero (El Salvador, 2011) In the 1970s, as El Salvador moved irrevocably closer to civil war, one man was known as the voice of the poor, the disenfranchised, the disappeared. Appointed Archbishop in 1977, Monseñor Oscar Romero worked tirelessly for peace, justice and human rights, while in constant personal peril. Using the power of the pulpit to denounce official corruption, he inspired millions with his nationally broadcast sermons, until in March of 1980; he was shot dead at the altar. Directors: Ana Carrigan and Juliet Weber.
            Friday, November 14: Pictures from a Revolution (Nicaragua, 1991): In this lively, intellectually stimulating discourse on the power of images, a renowned photojournalist returns to the scenes of a revolution she witnessed and captured with her camera. Delving into the lives of guerrillas, Sandinistas, and bystanders, scattered from Miami to Managua, a decade after they faced off in a bloody struggle, this artful film finds both disappointment and modest pride amidst still fresh, stirring memories. Director: Susan Meiselas.
            For more information please contact Paula Cuellar at cuell020@umn.edu.
            Paula Cuellar is the 2014-2015 Badzin Fellow in Holocaust and Genocide Studies and is currently working towards a minor in Human Rights and an advanced degree in History at the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on genocide of indigenous people in El Salvador and Paraguay in the 20th century. Cuellar's academic education includes a LL.B. Degree from the Central American University "José Simeón Cañas," a Master´s Degree in Human Rights and Education for Peace from the University of El Salvador and a LL.M. Degree in International Human Rights Law from Notre Dame. She also has a Postgraduate Diploma on Human Rights and Democratization´s Processes from the University of Chile and several diplomas on constitutional law and transitional justice courses.
            (Continue Reading)
          • Barbara Frey, will present on Human Rights Advocacy in Mexico at the first HGMV workshop

            "Uneven Ground: Asymmetries of Power in Human Rights Advocacy in Mexico"
            Presented by Barbara Frey, Director, Human Rights Program
            Thursday, October 2
            3:00p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences
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            The presentation is the first of the 2014-2015 workshops for the Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies (HGMV) Interdisciplinary Graduate Group.



            Professor Frey will explore the social and political context or "terrain" in which human
            rights actors work in Mexico and the barriers to their success in protecting human rights on the ground. She will show how this terrain affects advocacy by describing one particular case, the campaign for due process reforms in the criminal justice system. Frey's central finding is that the terrain of human rights advocacy in Mexico is profoundly "uneven" - characterized by asymmetries of power that limit the effectiveness of the human rights movement to bring about sustainable human rights protections.
            Barbara Frey is Director of the Human Rights Program in the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota. Frey has headed the Program since it was established in 2001, for the purpose of providing academic, research and outreach opportunities for students in the field of international human rights.
            The HGMV workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory.
            For more information about HGMV please email Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
            (Continue Reading)
          • Our Mothers, Our Heimat, Our Holocaust: "Ordinary" Nazis on German Television, 1984-2014

            A Lecture by Offer Ashkenazi
            Monday, September 22
            4:00 p.m.
            1210 Heller Hall

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            Edgar Reitz's groundbreaking TV drama "Heimat" aired 30 years ago in an attempt to 'take back" German history from the American entertainment industry. Going back to this drama -- and to the sequel and prequel Reitz directed during the past decades -- I will suggest that "Heimat" subtly provided a revolutionary portrayal of World War II as a framework in which "German" and "Jewish" categories have been melded together to create a new nation (or a genuine alternative to "American" imperialism). In emphasizing this process, I will look at more recent productions, such as "Generation War," to argue that Reitz's implicit notion of German-Jewish symbiosis has been replicated in later mainstream TV dramas. The transformation of this image, however, replaced the self-criticism (or self-mockery) of "Heimat" with a melodramatic affirmation of Germany's "cure" from its violent past.

            Ofer Ashkenazi, Department of History Koebner-Minerva Center for German History
            The Hebrew University, Jerusalem. Ashkenazi received his PhD in History from the Hebrew University in 2006 and conducted his post-doctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley, was a visiting professor at the University of Minnesota returning to Jerusalem, in the summer of 2013. During 2013-2014 he taught classes on the 'visual turn' in the study of history; cultural aspects of the Great War; film and history; and Nazism. His research interests include Central European cultural and intellectual history, modern visual culture, and Jewish urban experience in twentieth-century Europe. He is currently working on a research project that examines the works of filmmakers and photographers who emigrated from Germany during the 1930s. It explores the influence of the experiences, the intellectual paradigms, and the artistic imagination of the Weimar era on the development of various national cultures in post-1933 Europe, the United States and Israel.
            Presented by the Department of German,Scandinavian& Dutch. Sponsored by: The Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, The Center for German & European Studies, The Department of History and the Center for Jewish Studies
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          • Convert or Die Christian Persecution and the Rise of the Islamic State

            A round table discussion with French author Richard Millet

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            Thursday, September 18
            3:00pm
            Room 710 Social Sciences Building

            In recent months Christians in Iraq have been given a seriously stark choice by the terrorist group ISIS- "Convert, pay a religious tax, or die!" Forcing many to flee while others have been tortured and killed. Mainly unnoticed by the media the current crisis has hit peak levels and Iraqi Christians no longer feel safe in their homes or country.

            French author Richard Millet will discuss the current situation giving insight into the crisis. Millet has spent many years in Lebanon living among the Christian Maronites his latest work on Middle Eastern Christians will be published in Paris later this year.

            The lecture will be in French & English with a translation by Bruno Chaouat, Chair of the Department of French & Italian, and Monica Kelley, JD, PhD.

            This is the first and long-awaited visit of Richard Millet to the United States. Millet is the author of over twenty books of fiction, a prolific essayist, and a beacon of the contemporary French novel. His essays have provoked robust debate in Europe. His eclectic writings include autobiographical novels that explore questions of origin, mourning and dereliction. His most recent work is on Charlotte Salomon, a German Jewish artist murdered at Auschwitz.

            Sponsored by: Human Rights Program, Department of French & Italian and Program in Human Rights & Health

            Photo: Eddie Potros

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          • Call for Abstracts Special Issue of Gender & History

            Special Issue of Gender & History Volume 28:3 (November 2016)
            Gender and Global Warfare in the Twentieth Century
            Edited by Louise Edwards (UNSW Australia), Martha Hanna (University of Colorado), and Patricia M. E. Lorcin (University of Minnesota).

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            Gender & History calls for article abstracts for a special issue addressing 'Gender and Global Warfare in the Twentieth Century'. Although the occasion for this special issue is the centenary of the First World War, we are interested in contributions that provide a gendered analysis of modern warfare across the globe and throughout the twentieth century, as well as articles relating to the First World War era in particular. Scholarly contributions to the literature on gender and war are usually restricted to a specific war in a specific place, but the memory and trauma of past wars shape the politics, cultures and societies in post-war periods and create the basis on which future wars are waged, experienced or perceived.

            We welcome papers that consider these connections by exploring the gendered implications of global warfare, and also papers that connect the First World War era with subsequent wars. We encourage potential contributors to consider larger questions of how gender analysis challenges or changes some of the categories that routinely inform war studies. We invite work that falls under one or more of the following rubrics: gendering engagement and resistance, sexuality and violence, politics and culture, memory and trauma, health practices and medicine, and ideologies of war. Interested authors are encouraged to consult the extended version of this call for abstracts on the Gender & History website by clicking here.
            The production of the special issue will follow a symposium, to be held at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in late April or early May 2015 (date to be announced), whose participants will be selected on the basis of the abstracts submitted. Please submit 1-2 page abstracts in English (500-750 words maximum) to gendhist@umn.edu by October 1, 2014, with 'Special Issue 28:3 abstract submission' in the subject line (limited funds for the translation of articles written in other languages might be available). Invitations to present at the symposium will be issued in November 2014. Papers must be submitted for pre-circulation to the editors by March 30, 2015, as a condition of participation.
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          • Fellowship in Advanced Shoah Studies

            The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference)
            is offering a limited number of fellowships for Ph.D. and Post Doctoral Candidates
            Conducting Research on the Holocaust.

            The application deadline is January 5, 2015 for the academic year of 2015-2016.
            Maximum Award Amount: $20,000 Per Year

            The Saul Kagan Claims Conference Fellowship for Advanced Shoah Studies aims to strengthen Shoah studies and Holocaust memory throughout the world. Our mission is to support the advanced study of the fate of Jews who were systematically targeted for destruction or persecution by the Nazis and their allies between 1933 and 1945, as well as immediate post-war events.



            Studies covered by the Fellowships can include the immediate historical context in which the Holocaust took place and encompass political, economic, legal, religious and socio-cultural aspects, as well as ethical and moral implications. The Fellowship also supports awardees in learning languages necessary to studying original Holocaust- related documents, such as languages of the former Soviet Union and certain European countries. Candidates can be pursuing a degree in a variety of fields, including History, Sociology, Philosophy, Judaic Studies, Political Science, Government, Women's Studies and other fields. Candidates focusing on the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust will also be considered.
            For more information please click here.
            (Continue Reading)
          • First Meeting of the HGMV 2014-2015 Workshop Announced

            Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence
            Studies (HGMV) Interdisciplinary Graduate Group
            2014-2015 workshops

            First Meeting
            Thursday, September 18
            12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences Building
            Lunch will be provided

            The group was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory.

            The HGMV Graduate Group also provides funds for graduate students whose work has been accepted for conference presentations.

            To RSVP to the September 18 meeting or for more information on how to become involved please contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.


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          • Call for Applications: Introduction to the Holocaust in the Soviet Union

            The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum invites applications for the seminar "A Research Introduction to the Holocaust in the Soviet Union." This seminar will be held January 5-9, 2015, at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC.

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            The objective of the seminar is to acquaint advanced undergraduate, MA, and early PhD students with the central topics, issues, and sources related to the study of the Holocaust in the Soviet Union, including mass shootings, evacuation and rescue, forced labor, and issues of commemoration and memory. Mandel Center scholars will lead discussions, and the seminar will include group analysis of many of the types of primary source material available in the Museum's collections. In addition, participants will have the opportunity to explore the Museum's extensive library, archival, and other collections.

            All application materials must be received by Tuesday, September 30, 2014. Selected participants will be notified by November 1, 2014.

            Please click here for full details and application requirements.

            (Continue Reading)
          • Seats still available for new course, Never Again! Memory and Politics after Genocide

            SOC 4090 and GLOS 4910
            Tue/Th 1.00 to 2.30 (FALL 2014) /Room 15 Humphrey Center
            Instructor: Alejandro Baer, Associate Professor Sociology, Feinstein Chair and Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

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            Course overview: This course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. How do individuals, communities and societies come to terms with these atrocities? How do successor regimes balance the demands for justice with the need for peace and reconciliation? How is public memory of the atrocities constructed?

            Section I provides an overview of the basic concepts and themes of this class: defining mass violence, collective memory and forgetting in post-atrocity contexts, and transitional justice. In Section II we will look at memory of the Holocaust among descendants of victims and descendants of perpetrators and its impact on the way other communities shape and represent their memories of mass violence and victimhood, i.e. their specific demands, symbolic politics and judicial strategies. In Section III we will address cases from around the globe and different historical settings, including the legacies of State terror in Latin America, the aftermath of Stalinist mass violence in Eastern Europe and American Indian struggles for memory and justice.

            We will also examine public remembrance projects such as monuments and museums, film and television series, visual art and other initiatives which operate in conjunction or in tension with legal and political procedures (tribunals, truth commissions, reparations, etc.) and are often initiated by human rights NGOs, victim organizations, intellectuals and artists.

            Course Format: This course will be conducted as a combined lecture and discussion course. This basic format will be supplemented by occasional in-class exercises.

            Course Requirements: In addition to regular attendance and active participation in discussions, students are required to complete short in-class writing based on the readings, write two 4-5 page, double spaced, critical essays, complete one mid-term exam and a end of semester essay.


            Section I provides an overview of the basic concepts and themes of this class: defining mass violence, collective memory and forgetting in post-atrocity contexts, and transitional justice. In Section II we will look at memory of the Holocaust among descendants of victims and descendants of perpetrators and its impact on the way other communities shape and represent their memories of mass violence and victimhood, i.e. their specific demands, symbolic politics and judicial strategies. In Section III we will address cases from around the globe and different historical settings, including the legacies of State terror in Latin America, the aftermath of Stalinist mass violence in Eastern Europe and American Indian struggles for memory and justice.
            We will also examine public remembrance projects such as monuments and museums, film and television series, visual art and other initiatives which operate in conjunction or in tension with legal and political procedures (tribunals, truth commissions, reparations, etc.) and are often initiated by human rights NGOs, victim organizations, intellectuals and artists.
            Course Format: This course will be conducted as a combined lecture and discussion course. This basic format will be supplemented by occasional in-class exercises.
            Course Requirements: In addition to regular attendance and active participation in discussions, students are required to complete short in-class writing based on the readings, write two 4-5 page, double spaced, critical essays, complete one mid-term exam and a end of semester essay.
            Visit One Stop to register.
            (Continue Reading)
          • Registration open for Holocaust and Genocide related courses

            Registration for University of Minnesota's fall 2014 semester is now open with a number of courses that fall within the Center's interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Holocaust and genocide.

            The following courses are designed to provide direct and comprehensive instruction on the topic of the Holocaust, as well as the social, memorial and political impact of genocides:

            History 3729, Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe
            Professor Gary Cohen
            Comprehensive exploration of Third Reich. Students will examine How the Nazis came to power, transformations of 1930s, imposition of racial politics against Jews/others, nature of total war. Students read historical accounts, memoirs, state documents, view films.

            Global Studies 4910, "Never Again!" Memory and Politics After Genocide
            Professor Alejandro Baer
            This course focuses on the aftermath of large-scale political violence. How do individuals, communities and societies come to terms with these atrocities? How do successor regimes balance the demands for justice with the need for peace and reconciliation? How is public memory of the atrocities constructed?

            For an extended list of multi-disciplinary courses that present contextual studies of conflicts, human rights violations, power dynamics, social memory and transformation that are mirrored in the Holocaust and other genocides, please see the Fall 2014 Courses List.pdf

            To register please visit the University of Minnesota's One Stop Home.


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          • Paula Sofia Cuellar announced as the 2014-2015 Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellow

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            The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Department of History are pleased to announce the Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies has been awarded to Paula Sofia Cuellar.

            Cuellar's research project will focus on genocide of indigenous people in El Salvador and Paraguay in the twentieth century. She suggests that during the military dictatorships of General Maximiliano Hernández in El Salvador (1931 to 1944) and of General Alfredo Stroessner in Paraguay (1954 to 1989), the genocide of indigenous people characterized national security policies in both countries.

            Cuellar's academic education includes a LL.B. Degree from the Central American University "José Simeón Cañas" and includes a Master´s Degree in Human Rights and Education for Peace from the University of El Salvador and a LL.M. Degree in International Human Rights Law from Notre Dame. She also has a Postgraduate Diploma on Human Rights and Democratization´s Processes from the University of Chile and several diplomas on constitutional law and transitional justice courses. She is currently working towards a minor in Human Rights and an advanced degree in History at the University of Minnesota.

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            Wahutu Siguru the recipient of the Badzin Graduate Fellowship in 2013-2014 will receive a $9,000 fellowship extension for Spring semester of 2015 to continue his research. Siguru seeks to answer the questions about what frames and memories journalists (especially African journalists) rely upon when reporting about mass violence, specifically on Darfur. Siguru hopes to show how the way conflict situations are represented have consequences on how suffering and victimization are understood and what types of responses they will inspire in terms of possible interventions (humanitarian, legal or military).

            The Badzin Fellowship pays a living stipend of $18,000, and the cost of tuition, mandatory fees and health insurance. An applicant must be a current student in a Ph.D. program in the College of Liberal Arts, currently enrolled in the first, second, third, or fourth year of study, and have a doctoral dissertation project in Holocaust and genocide studies.
            The fellowship is awarded on the basis of the quality and scholarly potential of the dissertation project, the applicant's quality of performance in the graduate program, and the applicant's general scholarly promise.
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          • Daniel Schroeter awarded Ina Levine Invitational Scholar Fellowship

            One of the less known dimensions of the history of World War II was how Jews living under French colonial rule in North Africa were devastated by the fall of France and the establishment of the French collaborationist government of Vichy in 1940. The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) in Washington, DC has in recent years amassed a considerable archive related to the Jews of North Africa during the war and has encouraged scholars to research this subject.

            In June 2010, Daniel Schroeter, the Amos S. Deinard Memorial Chair in Jewish History at the University of Minnesota, co-taught a research workshop at the USHMM, and began studying their voluminous collection of documents. He will be returning to Washington, DC, having been awarded the Ina Levine Invitational Scholar Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies of the USHMM for the 2014-2015 academic year.

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            During Schroeter's residency at the USHMM, he will be conducting research for a book on the subject of Vichy and the Jews in the protectorate of Morocco. Jews under French colonial rule were legally classified as indigenous Moroccan subjects of the sultan, a ruler whose power was limited and controlled by the French administration. The anti-Jewish laws, instigated by the central Vichy government in France, and promulgated in Morocco by the French protectorate authorities as royal decrees signed by the sultan Mohammed Ben Youssef, revealed the racism and discrimination inherent in the colonial system and the ambivalent position of the Moroccan monarchy and the Muslim population towards the Jews.

            Research conducted at the Center will focus on the legal, social, and economic impact of the Vichy regime on the Moroccan Jewish communities, the response of the Muslim leaders and population to the anti-Jewish measures implemented in different parts of the country, and the contested politics of remembrance of World War II in Morocco.

            For more information on Daniel Schroeter, please click here.

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          • Exhumations, Memory and the Return of Civil War Ghosts in Spain

            On May 8th, the Reframing Mass Violence Collaborative hosted Associate Researcher of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Francisco Ferrándiz, to present a lecture entitled Exhumations, Memory and the Return of Civil War Ghosts in Spain.

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            In his talk, Ferrándiz examined the social process of the exhumation of mass graves from the Spanish Civil War and the Post-War years, including from political and legal initiatives of great social and media impact to local actions on the ground, at times failed, ephemeral or almost imperceptible, but no less crucial.

            To view the lecture please click here.

            This event was co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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          • Genocide and its Aftermath: Lessons from Rwanda


            On April 16, 17 & 19, the Institute for Global Studies, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Human Rights Program held a series of events to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 1994 genocide that took the lives of an estimated 500,000-1,000,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus. The events included a public conference, a student conference, and a K-16 teacher workshop. The objectives of the commemorative events were: promoting public understanding of what happened in Rwanda, discussing the immediate responses of the international community to the violence, and analyzing the long-term consequences that the cataclysmic failure to prevent the genocide had on international policy and action.

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            The public conference, Genocide and its Aftermath: Lessons from Rwanda, was designed to bring together research and praxis. Academics, activists and diplomats led a public exploration of what we have learned from the genocide in Rwanda and how we have been affected by, and should use, that knowledge to create more effective methods of intervention. Themes of the panels included: representations of atrocity, immediate aftermaths, transitional justice and its impacts, and preventing genocide and mass atrocity.

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            Watch the conference's opening address by Taylor Krauss, founder of Voices of Rwanda, and the keynote address by Adama Dieng, United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, as well as the three panel discussions, by clicking here or visiting CHGS' youtube channel.


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          • Hollie Nyseth Brehm will represent CHGS at summer Genocide Scholars Conference


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            Dr. Hollie Nyseth Brehm will represent the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies this summer at the International Association of Genocide Scholars (IAGS) Conference, "Time, Movement, and Space: Genocide Studies and Indigenous Peoples." Held at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada from July 16-19, 2014, this eleventh annual conference presents an opportunity for genocide scholars to engage in discussion about colonial control over, expansion into, appropriation and settlement of Indigenous territories.

            At the Saturday session of the conference, Dr. Nyseth Brehm will join Christoper Uggen and Jean-Damascene Gasanabo to present a panel on "Genocide, Justice and Rwanda's Gacaca Courts" under the conference's heading of "Genocide's Spaces of Law and Justice."

            On June 9, 2014 Dr. Nyseth Brehm successfully defended her dissertation, "Conditions and Courses of Genocides." Her advisors are professors Elizabeth Boyle and Joachim Savelsberg. In fall 2014, Dr. Nyseth Brehm will begin her career as an Assistant Professor of Sociology with the Department of Sociology at Ohio State University-Columbus.


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          • CHGS & HRP grant three students human rights awards


            Each spring, the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies celebrate the tremendous work of students in human rights with the Inna Meiman Award and the Sullivan Ballou Award. This year three University of Minnesota undergraduate students have been recognized for their accomplishments in promoting and protecting human rights. Melanie Paurus has been awarded the 4th Annual Inna Meiman Human Rights Award, while Joe Fifield and Anna Meteyer have been honored with the Sullivan Ballou Award.

            The Inna Meiman Award is given in recognition of the friendship between Inna Meiman, a Soviet era Jewish refusenik who was repeatedly denied a visa to seek medical treatment, and Lisa Paul, a graduate of the University of Minnesota who fought tirelessly on her behalf, including a 25-day hunger strike that galvanized a movement for Inna's freedom. The award is intended to recognize a University of Minnesota student who embodies a commitment to human rights. As this year's recipient, Melanie Paurus will receive a $1,000 scholarship.

            The Sullivan Ballou Award is supported by the Sullivan Ballou Fund and is named after Major Sullivan Ballou, an Army soldier killed at the First Battle of Bull Run in the U.S. Civil War. The award honors Major Ballou's memory by recognizing a student who devotes heartfelt energy to promote human rights. The Sullivan Ballou Fund gives $1000 awards to celebrate and affirm people acting from the heart. They provide compassion, services, or advocacy to their local communities, the poor, homeless, children, victims of violence and mistreatment or the disabled.

            Melanie, Joe and Anna embody the spirit with which these awards were created - recognizing a significant personal contribution to protecting human rights and the heartfelt energy that compels an advocate to take meaningful action.

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          • Exhumations, Memory, and the Return of Civil War Ghosts in Spain

            Francisco Ferrandiz, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

            Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe.

            Thursday, May 8
            3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
            1-109 Herbert M Hanson, Jr Hall

            Since 2000, the exhumation of mass graves from the Spanish Civil War and the Post-War years, mostly involving the largely abandoned graves of civilians killed in the Francoist rearguard by paramilitary groups, has become a central element in contemporary social and political debates in the country about the nature of the armed conflict and the dictatorial regime following it. Although exhumations have become a crucial tool for symbolic reparation and have triggered claims for justice for the crimes committed and now unearthed, the social process unleashed by their opening is way larger, and relates to the emergence of a fragmented and heterogeneous political culture focused on the memory of the defeated in the war.

            In this talk, the complexity and dynamism of this process is analyzed, including from political and legal initiatives of great social and media impact to local actions on the ground, at times failed, ephemeral or almost imperceptible, but no less crucial. Regional differences, associated to uneven public memory policies, will also be considered.

            Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence Research Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.


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          • CHGS partners with international Holocaust institutions for a major conference in Madrid



            On November 24-26, 2014, a conference entitled, Bystanders, Rescuers or Perpetrators? The Neutrals and the Shoah - Facts, Myths and Countermyths, will be held at Centro Sefarad-Israel in Madrid, Spain.

            This conference is supported by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) and sponsored by Centro Sefarad Israel - Madrid; Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies- University of Minnesota; Mémorial de la Shoah - Paris; History Unit of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland - Berne; Topography of Terror Foundation - Berlin; Living History Forum - Stockholm; Memoshoá/Association for the Education and Remembrance of the Holocaust - Lisbon and Tarih Vakfı/History Foundation - Istanbul.

            The conveners are calling for scholarly papers on the policies of the neutral countries during the Holocaust and the public debate on them in these countries.

            The conference will thus aim at addressing the following issues:

            •The neutral countries' reactions to Nazi anti-Jewish policies and their own policies on Jewish refugees;
            •Their response to the German ultimatum of 1943 to either repatriate Jews with citizenship from their respective countries who lived in Nazi-occupied Europe or to allow their deportation;
            •The genesis and long-lasting effects of "rescue myths", the current state of the discussion regarding the neutral countries' positions during the Holocaust;
            •The dealing with the history of the Jewish persecution in state fact-finding commissions and committees of historians;
            •Approaches to Holocaust education in neutral countries.
            •Holocaust public memory (ceremonies, memorials, museums) and memory politics in neutral countries.

            Please send your proposals (up to 350 words) and brief CVs no later than May 25, 2014 to: conference2014@sefarad-israel.es

            For more information, please view Call for Papers Bystanders.doc

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          • The Role of Visual Testimony in Survivors of the Mayan Genocide in Guatemala and Mexico

            Marisol Soto, PhD student at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

            Holocaust Genocide & Mass Violence Studies Workshop (HGMV)

            Thursday, May 1
            Room 609 Social Sciences
            3:00PM

            Marisol Soto's project examines the intersection among photography, social integration beyond trauma and the action of human rights organizations, and explores the important role that photography plays in documenting and reporting human trafficking that targets indigenous populations. I contend that genocides do not only result in direct violence against their victims, but also leave vulnerable communities of survivors that are targets of further violence. In addition, this proposal examines paradoxes resulting from the use of testimonies and archives outside the human rights community, such as in the consumption of atrocity in the media, an act which leads to the re-victimization of young women and children who are victims of trafficking. Finally, I will use photography and literary and testimonial narratives in new ways that complement more traditional forms of expression and provide new insights into the trauma of the victims, with the ultimate goal of contributing to their recovery and protection, and to raise awareness in the society.


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          • Under Construction: Battles of Memory, Human Rights and Cultural Practices

            Ana Forcinito, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese, U of M.
            Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe.
            Thursday, April 24
            3:00 p.m.
            1-109 Hanson Hall

            Cultural practices have played a crucial role in the construction of collective memory in Argentina, by addressing the invisibility and the silence about human rights violations, by exploring different layers of memory, and by reframing the interpretations that surround human rights struggles. This talk will offer an overview of the battles of memory after the last military dictatorship in Argentina (1976-1983), focusing on artistic and cultural practices in dialogue with crucial moments of the post dictatorship period.

            Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence Research Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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          • The Evolving Memory of Argentina's "Disappeared"

            Thursday, April 10
            4:00p.m.
            Northrop, Best Buy Theater

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            Speaker: Emilio Crenzel, Sociology, University of Buenos Aires
            Response: Leigh Payne, Global Studies, University of Oxford and University of Minnesota

            The panel sheds light on the most substantial transformations and the continuities in Argentina's social memory of its recent past and discusses the processes that led Argentina's Truth Commission Report Nunca Más (1984) to become the canonical way the disappearances and the country's political violence is publicly remembered, and how its meaning has been modified by new interpretations in the last two decades.

            Other University of Minnesota faculty participants on the panel are Ana Forcinito (Spanish and Portuguese Studies) and Alejandro Baer (Director, CHGS).

            Both panels are cosponsored by the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

            The Reframing Mass Violence Collaborative explores the particular developments and transnational entanglements of social memories in societies, revisiting their legacies of dictatorship, state terror, and grave human rights violations in Latin America and Southern Europe.

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          • Twin Cities Film Premier Aftermath & The Last of the Unjust

            Aftermath
            Thursday, April 10
            7:00p.m.
            St, Anthony Main Theatre
            Part of The Film Society of Mpls/St. Paul International Film Festival
            Introduction by Alejandro Baer, Director CHGS

            For tickets and information please click here.

            Inspired by real events that haunt Poland's past, Wladyslaw Pasikowski (who wrote the screenplay for Andrzej Wajda's Katyn) turns in a hard-hitting allegory on the anti-Semitism that still raises its ugly head in his home country. Franek and Jozek are brothers who are reunited after 20 years in order to take care of the family farm. Franek, recently returned from the US, discovers that Jozek has been ostracized from the community for threatening to uncover a dark secret. As Franek and Jozek struggle to rebuild their relationship, they are drawn into a horrifying gothic tale. Upon its release in Poland, Aftermath received acclaim, but also generated intense controversy.

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            The Last of the Unjust
            Sunday, April 13
            1 p.m.
            St Anthony Main Theatre
            Part of The Film Society of Mpls/St. Paul International Film Festival
            Introduction by Bruno Chaoaut, Chair, Department of French & Italian, former director CHGS.

            For tickets and information please click here.

            Claude Lanzmann returns to a series of interviews he made in 1975 with Benjamin Murmelstein, the last President of the Jewish Council in the Theresienstadt ghetto. Murmelstein was largely demonized after the war, accused of collaborating with the Nazis, with his survival being the proof. These interviews, however, tell a different story--one of a pragmatic man who fought not only for his own survival but also the survival of every Jew he could possibly help. A powerful addendum to Lanzmann's masterpiece Shoah, The Last of the Unjust employs an unadorned style for an incredibly complicated historical narrative that continues to be defined today.

            Sponsored by the European Studies Consortium, Institute for Global Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, The Center for Jewish Studies, the Department of French & Italian, and The Film Society of Mpls/St. Paul.

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          • Rescheduled: War, Genocide & Justice: Cambodian American Memory Work

            A lecture by Cathy Schlund-Vials
            Thursday, April 3
            3:00p.m.
            Walter Library Conference Room 101

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            Dr. Schlund-Vials is an Associate Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Connecticut at Storrs. She is the Director of the UConn Asian American Studies Institute and the Faculty Director for Humanities House. She was awarded the 2011 AAUP "Teaching Promise" award (at the University of Connecticut). In 2013, she was the recipient of the Association for Asian American Studies's "Early Career Award."

            Her research interests include refugee cultural production, critical race theory, immigration law, human rights, and contemporary ethnic American literary studies.

            She has recently completed her second book, War, Genocide, and Justice: Cambodian American Memory Work (University of Minnesota Press, Fall 2012), which is focused on genocide remembrance and juridical activism in Cambodian American literature, film, and hip hop.

            Dr. Schlund-Vials is currently working on a third project, tentatively titled "Imperial Coordinates: War, Containment, and Asian American Critique," which engages a spatial reading of U.S. imperialism through Asian American writing about militarized zones, internment camps, and relocation centers.

            Sponsored by: Asian American Studies, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, University of Minnesota Press.

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          • Badzin Fellowship Call for Applications Extended

            Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies, 2014-15

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            The University of Minnesota Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Department of History invite applications from current doctoral students in the UMN College of Liberal Arts for the Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies for the academic year 2014-15. The Badzin Fellowship will pay a stipend of $18,000, the cost of tuition and health insurance, and $1,000 toward the mandatory graduate student fees.

            Eligibility: An applicant must be a current student in a Ph.D. program in the College of Liberal Arts, currently enrolled in the first, second, third, or fourth year of study, and have a doctoral dissertation project in Holocaust and/or genocide studies. The fellowship will be awarded on the basis of the quality and scholarly potential of the dissertation project, the applicant's quality of performance in the graduate program, and the applicant's general scholarly promise.

            Required application materials:

            1) A letter of application (maximum 4 pages single-spaced) describing the applicant's intellectual interests and dissertation research and the research and/or writing which the applicant expects to do during the fellowship year
            2) A current curriculum vitae for the applicant
            3) An unofficial transcript of all graduate work done at the University of Minnesota
            4) TWO confidential letters of recommendation from U of MN faculty, discussing the quality of the applicant's graduate work and dissertation project and the applicant's progress toward completing the degree, sent directly to the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

            Deadline: All application materials must be received by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies electronically at chgs@umn.edu, no later than 3:00 pm on Friday, April 11, 2014. The awardee will be announced Friday, April 25, 2014.


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          • CHGS and University Departments and Centers comment on the Gasthof dinner

            Minneapolis group 'plays' Nazi: Sorry, it's no trifle
            by ALEJANDRO BAER, SABINE ENGEL, RICK MC CORMICK, RIV-ELLEN PRELL, RUTH MAZO KARRAS, and KLAAS VAN DER SANDEN
            Star Tribune
            March 19, 2014

            It's an insult to those who suffered in the Holocaust and to those who campaigned then (and since) against such evil.

            Late last week, City Pages published photographs that showed men dressed in German SS uniforms seated in the main dining room of the northeast Minneapolis restaurant Gasthof zur Gemutlichkeit, surrounded by Nazi flags. According to a participant, this was a World War II historical re-enactment meeting, "just like any club that has a party."

            In Germany and several other European states, laws prohibit the public use of symbols of Nazism -- in particular, flags, insignia and uniforms. The reason: It assaults the human dignity of others by insulting, maliciously smearing or defaming segments of the population.

            While in the United States the First Amendment gives constitutional protection to this type of conduct -- no matter how offensive its content -- the public display of racist or extremist symbolism usually has been followed by indignation, outrage and demands for action.

            To read the entire article please click here.

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          • IAS Collaborative Reframing Mass Violence presents Glenda Mezarobba

            Brazilian Truth Commission: Is It Time to 'Reframe' the Gross Human Rights Violations?
            Glenda Mezarobba
            Thursday, March 27
            3:00-4:30pm
            1-109 Hanson Hall

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            Glenda Mezarobba, United Nations Development Project Representative for the Brazilian Truth Commission

            Glenda Mezarobba provides an overview of the Brazilian Truth Commission and reflects on the meaning and the implications of the work of countries, like Brazil, to revisit their legacies of dictatorship (1964-1988). She presents possibilities of these contemporary processes to re-interpret and re-frame the atrocities themselves and to improve the quality of Brazil's democratic institutions.

            Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence Research Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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          • Carla Manzoni, PhD Candidate, Spanish and Portuguese to present at the next HGMV workshop

            Argentina's Collages of Memory: Aesthetic heritage in post-dictatorial film Los Rubios (2003)
            Holocaust, Genocide, Mass Violence Workshop
            Thursday, March 13
            3:00 p.m.
            Room 609 Social Sciences

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            Los Rubios (The Blonds)
            In 1977, when she was four years old, Albertina Carri's parents vanished without a trace, victims of Argentina's brutal military junta. In The Blonds, (or Los Rubios, her parents' nickname) the young Argentinian filmmaker travels with her crew across Buenos Aires to unravel the mystery of her parents' life, disappearance and death. Attacking the shifting projections of memory from many fronts, Carri enlists an actor, her parents' comrades, fading photographs and happy Playmobil* dolls to investigate complicated questions of identity and responsibility.

            Carla Manzoni was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She is currently a PhD candidate (A.B.D since April, 27. 2012) at the Spanish and Portuguese Department, University of Minnesota. She holds a MA in Hispanic and Lusophonic Literatures and Cultures at the same university and previous studies in her native Argentina in Public Relations (undergraduate) and Communication Management (post-graduate).

            Carla has worked in political communication, diverse media -such as TV, radio and film- and cultural non-for-profits. She is currently working on her dissertation as wells as on her conservation project which attempts to create an archive of unedited Latin American independent videoart and experimental audiovisual.

            For information on the workshop and future presentations please click here.

            To particpate please contact Wahutu Siguru at siguru@umn.edu.

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          • IAS Collaborative: Upcoming Public Lecture

            Uruguayan Memories of Dictatorship: A lector by Mariana Achugar
            (Carnegie Mellon University)
            Thursday, March 6
            Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe
            Thursdays 3:00p.m. to 4:30p.m.
            1-109 Herbert M Hanson, Jr Hall

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            Why do family conversations matter in processes of intergenerational transmission of traumatic pasts? Mariana Achugar will share some examples from a two-year ethnographic project in Uruguay where 20 youth and their families were interviewed. The analysis of the styles of interactions that occur in these families with different backgrounds will show how they make sense of the past and what narratives characterize their recollections. She will then attempt to explain why some conversations produce "more sharable" memories of the dictatorship.



            The IAS collaborative explores the particular developments and transnational entanglements of social memories in societies revisiting their legacies of dictatorship, state terror, and grave human rights violations in Latin America and Southern Europe.
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          • Genocide and its Aftermaths: Lessons from Rwanda

            A Series of Events to Commemorate the 20th Anniversary of the Genocide in Rwanda
            April 16, 17, 19, 2014

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            The Institute for Global Studies in partnership with The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Human Rights Program are hosting a series of events to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the genocide that took place in Rwanda in 1994. The events will include a public conference, a student conference, and a K-16 teacher workshop. The objectives of the commemorative events are: promoting public understanding of what happened in Rwanda, discussing the immediate responses of the international community to the violence, and analyzing the long-term consequences that the cataclysmic failure to prevent the genocide had on international policy and action.

            Sponsorship made possible in part by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Fund at the Minneapolis Foundation.

            The Public Conference
            Wednesday, April 16
            Cowles Auditorium, Humphrey School of Public Affairs
            The public conference is designed to bring together research and praxis. Academics, activists and diplomats will lead a public exploration of what we have learned from the Rwandan genocide and how we have been affected by, and should use, that knowledge to create more effective methods of intervention. Themes of the panels include: representations of atrocity, immediate aftermaths, transitional justice and its impacts, and preventing genocide and mass atrocity. This event will be free and open to the public.
            Featured Speaker: Adama Dieng, UN Special Advisor on Genocide Prevention
            Other Speakers Include:
            Eric Schwartz, Dean, Humphrey School, former National Security Adviser to President Clinton
            Curt Goering, Executive Director, Center for Victims of Torture and former Chief Operating Officer at Amnesty International USA
            Alejandro Baer, Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at the University of Minnesota
            Gregory Gordon, Director of the University of North Dakota (UND) Center for Human Rights & Genocide Studies and Former Legal Officer, at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
            Barbara Frey, Director of Human Rights Program at the University of Minnesota
            Samuel Totten, Ed.D, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Arkansas
            Leigh Payne, Professor at Oxford and Senior Research Fellow for the Institute for Global Studies
            The Student Conference
            Thursday, April 17th
            Coffman Union
            The students' conference will bring together undergraduate students throughout the Midwest, from different disciplines, who are working on the genocide in Rwanda or other episodes of genocide and mass violence. Those interested in more information or submitting work should see the Call for Papers for more details and contact Wahutu j. Siguru at siguru@umn.edu by the 28th of February 2014.
            The K-16 Teacher Workshop: Featuring Professor Samuel Totten
            Saturday, April 19
            Coffman Union
            9:00a.m. to 3:00p.m.
            Samuel Totten is one of the foremost scholars of curriculum on Holocaust and genocide education and has published several texts to aid educators integrate this curriculum in their classrooms.
            CEU's are available.
            Class will be limited to 25. For more information, contact Deborah Jane at djane@umn.edu.
            Please check back for further details and updates in the coming weeks. Contact Kaela McConnon at mccon117@umn.edu with any questions or concerns.
            Event Co-sponsors: The Center for Victims of Torture, The Advocates for Human Rights, Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas, St. Cloud State Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education, World Without Genocide, Department of History, Department of French and Italian, the Institute of Diversity, Equality and Advocacy, the Program in Human Rights and Health and the Human Rights Center of the University of Minnesota
            Artwork: "Valentina's Nightmare (Face/Hand Rough)" by Peter Driessen, 1997.
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          • Call for Papers:Genocide and its Aftermaths: Lessons from Rwanda

            Undergraduate Students Conference
            April 17, 2014

            The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Human Rights Program and the Institute for Global Studies are hosting three days of events to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the genocide that took place in Rwanda in 1994. The events will include a public conference (April 16th), a student conference (April 17th) and a K-12 teacher workshop (April 19th). The objectives of the commemorative events are to promote public understanding of what happened in Rwanda, analyze the immediate responses by the international community, and discuss the long-term implications for international policy and actions to prevent and respond to genocide.

            The students' conference seeks to bring together undergraduate students (preferably advanced undergraduates) from different disciplines that are working on the Rwandan Genocide or other episodes of genocide and mass violence. To this end, we are seeking a broad range of papers that examine but are not limited to the following topics:


            The Rwandan Genocide: Historical and socio-political paths leading to the genocide; the role of the international community, including the ICTR; the gacaca courts; testimonials of survivors; public memory; etc.

            Genocide and the international community: Intervention or lack thereof in genocides and large-scale political violence; potential responses to genocide and mass violence; the role of neighboring countries, the UN and other countries.

            Genocide and the media: International and local media coverage of genocide; hate media and genocide incitement; representations of mass violence and its (cognitive and ethical) limits.

            Rape as genocide: Rape and other forms of gendered victimization during or in the aftermath of mass violence; women-headed households; medical care; children of rape.

            Justice and politics of reconciliation after genocide: The role and effectiveness of judicial processes and transitional justice mechanisms such as the ICTR, truth commissions and reparations.

            Genocide and public memory: Memorials, museums and commemoration days/weeks; the politics of commemoration; the use of human remains in memorials and related issues.

            Genocide and education. Teaching about genocide and mass atrocities; the representation of genocide in history and other textbooks.

            Abstracts not exceeding 250 words and a 2 page CV should be sent to Wahutu j. Siguru Siguru@umn.edu by the 28th of February 2014. For more information, please visit the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies Symposia & Conference page.

            The organizers will provide supporting funds to defray the costs of the participants whose paper are accepted for presentation. Out of state student presenters will be awarded up to $500 and in state student presenters will be awarded up to $200.

            The conference was made possible by funding from the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies at The Minneapolis Foundation and is sponsored by The Institute for Global Studies, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and the Human Rights Program at the University of Minnesota.


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          • IAS Collaborative Reframing Mass Violence presents Alejandro Baer

            The Collective Memory of Mass Atrocities
            A talk by Alejandro Baer, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, U of M
            Thursday, February 20
            3:00p.m.
            Room 1-109 Hanson Hall

            "Postmemory", "multi-directional memory" and "cosmopolitan memory" are terms used by contemporary scholars to describe the changing nature of the practices of remembrance in post-conflict societies. We will look at the emerging modes of traumatic memory production, circulation and consumption in a globalized context, which are highly conditioned by the language of the Holocaust. The Jewish genocide serves as powerful symbol and also as a cognitive model--a script--for structuring and framing the events of a troubling past. What are its effects on social relations and individual subjects?

            Session 3 in the public, one-credit course Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe.

            Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

            This event has been designated by the Office of the Vice President for Research to satisfy the Awareness/Discussion component of the Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) continuing education requirement.

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          • Verena Stern, Research Fellow, Center for Austrian Studies to present at HGMV workshop

            Holocaust Genocide & Mass Violence Studies Workshop (HGMV)
            "Grievable Lives": Dealing with Dimensions of (Mass) Violence in Somali Transnational Migration"
            Thursday, February 13
            3:00 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences

            Verena Stern is the 2013/2014 BMWF Doctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Austrian Studies at the University of Minnesota and a doctoral candidate at the Department of Political Science at the University of Vienna. She is writing her dissertation on the migration of undocumented refugees from Somalia to the European Union. Stern's research interests include Human Rights and transnational migration.

            Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS), the Human Rights Program and the Department of Sociology organizes this research workshop for graduate students and faculty members of all departments in the Humanities and Social Sciences at University of Minnesota. For a list of past and future presenters please visit the CHGS workshop page by clicking here.

            For more information or to particpate please contact Wahutu Siguru at siguru@umn.edu.

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          • Apollo Club Male Chorus Present Special Concert

            The Liberation of Auschwitz
            with special guests James Andrews, dancer, and Aaron James, baritone
            Tuesday, January 27
            7:00 P.M.
            Ted Mann Concert Hall
            Tickets available by clicking here.

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            Tuesday, January 27, 2015 marks (exactly) the 70th anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz. Arnold Schoenberg's rarely performed A Survivor from Warsaw is programmed within the WORLD-PREMIERE of noted composer James Bassi's Five Prayers. Commissioned by The Apollo Club, Five Prayers is a five-movement symphonic song cycle for male chorus, solo baritone, orchestra, and dancer. This concert is artistically conceived to begin and end liberatingly with the darkest moment in the center of the program, to symbolically represent the U-shaped Jewish menorah.
            Artisans of Music
            The Apollo Club elevates the consciousness of performance music by creating an authentic stage for amateurs and professionals alike. Since 1895, it is the signature icon of sacred and secular music in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, bringing together generations of voices who inspire audiences locally, nationally and internationally. As "artisans of music," the organization is dedicated to building craft, culture and camaraderie in the community.
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          • Special Screening of Granito: How to Nail a Dictator with filmmakers Pamela Yates and Paco Onís

            3:00 p.m.
            St Anthony Main Theatre
            Free open to the public

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            Granito tells the stories of five main characters whose destinies are joined together by Guatemala's turbulent past. Even though the Guatemalan civil war spanned from 1960-1996, Granito focuses in on the early 1980s and its ramifications for the country.

            Pamela Yates is an American documentary filmmaker and co-founder of Skylight Pictures. Four of her films have been nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.

            Paco Onis is a partner at Skylight Pictures, and previously produced documentaries for PBS, National Geographic and a range of other programs.

            Granito: Trailer

            Screening with filmmakers is part of the Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe course which take place on
            Thursday's from 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in room 235 Notle Center. All lectures are open to the public.

            Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

            Co-sponsored by the Film Society of Mpls/St. Paul.


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          • Reframing Mass Violence: Transitional Justice and Human Rights

            Barbara Frey, Director, Human Rights Program, University of Minnesota
            Thursday, January 23
            3:00 p.m.
            235 Nolte

            Countries emerging from repression, armed conflict, or mass atrocities have sought ways to address the past as a part of their transition into new forms of governance and citizenship. In this introduction to the topic, Barbara Frey will review some of the methods and mechanisms that have been developed by national and international actors, including public memorials, truth commissions, and national or international criminal prosecutions to assist societies to transition away from their repressive pasts.

            Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

            Lecture Flier: 20140114170524742.pdf

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          • Violence in Central Africa: Is the Central African Republic on the Road to Genocide?

            By Wahutu Siguru

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            Something insidious, but sadly not unexpected, is happening in the Central African Republic (CAR)-over the past twelve months mass killings have been taking place in the CAR, a former French colony in a very rough neighborhood (it borders the Sudan's to the East, Chad to the North, and DRC to the South). Things came to a head in March when the former president Francois Bozizé was deposed by a group of Muslim militants (Séléka) whom instigated sectarian killings and human rights abuses against the largely Christian populace. This has resulted in the formation of self-defense groups (Anti-balaka meaning 'sword/machete' in the Sango language) formed to protect the victims. This conflict is complicated by the fact that there are claims of the Séléka getting support from mercenaries in Sudan and Chad.

            On the 5th of December, the UN voted to allow the French to send 400 troops into the CAR who would augment the already present AU battalion of 3600. The French intend on increasing this number to 1200 troops in the coming days following a sudden outbreak of killings within the last fortnight of women and children by Séléka forces (meaning 'union' in the Sango language) that has resulted in 500 deaths and 189,000 fleeing their homes in Bangui. Fears of retaliatory attacks have become more pronounced leading both Burundi and Rwanda to pledge to send troops to the country. While the number of deaths might seem deceptively low for a nation of about 4.6 million, it only accounts for Bangui since correspondents have not been able to venture outside that area.

            In a letter by Medecins Sans Frontieres to the UN humanitarian system, MSF has accused the UN of indifference to the plight of the victims. It states that in the year that this atrocity has unfolded UN aid officials have done nothing but collect data that is related to the fighting and not provided assistance to the displaced people sheltering on the same compound as the officials.
            It is important to note that this is not "another Rwanda" as has been suggested by some. This is a power grab by a cabal of rebels that seeks to control the vast minerals that are present in CAR. It is not an attempt to rid CAR of its Christian population but rather an attempt to instill fear and submission by a belligerent group. While there may be what some UN officials have called the seeds of genocide this does not ipso facto mean that "another Rwanda" is at hand. It is however, an atrocity that is fast degenerating and a humanitarian catastrophe that is getting worse. The international community finds itself at a crossroads like it has on several occasions (Syria and Mali being the most recent). The French and the AU have taken a proactive role in trying to mitigate the situation but more is needed. The UN humanitarian system also has to step up and rise to the challenge.
            This weekend the first signs of hope appeared. Michel Djotodja, the current president and former leader of the Séléka leader said that he is willing to negotiate with Anti-balaka forces. The only problem is that he barely has control of the capital city and some of his former fighters have gone their own way. This is coupled by the fact that no one is sure how much control the faction of Anti-balaka that is willing to negotiate is representative of the movement itself. All of this is compounded by the fact that Anti-balaka has no recognizable structure further throwing into doubt who the president is actually going to negotiate with. Is it simple? No. Is it hopeless? No. It will require some rolling up of sleeves by the UN, AU, France and possibly the UNSC. This development is, however, a small but positive step that has to be fostered and natured by the international community, the sooner the better
            Wahutu Siguru is the 2013 Badzin Fellow in Holocaust and Genocide Studies and PhD candidate in the Sociology department at the University of Minnesota. Siguru's research interests are in the Sociology of Media, Genocide, Mass Violence and Atrocities (specifically on issues of representation of conflicts in Africa such as Darfur and Rwanda), Collective Memory, and perhaps somewhat tangentially Democracy and Development in Africa.
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          • The Last of the Unjust, the final words of Benjamin Murmelstein

            By Jodi Elowitz

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            Who was Benjamin Murmelstein? Why would Claude Lanzmann dedicate over 3 hours to him in his latest film The Last of the Unjust? Murmelstein was a rabbi and teacher from Vienna, third Jewish elder of the Thereseinstadt ghetto, and the only surviving Jewish elder of any of the Jewish Councils set up by the Nazis. Condemned by many in the Jewish Community as a traitor and a Nazi collaborator he was tried and acquitted by the Czech authorities after the war settling in exile in Rome where he lived until his death in 1989.

            He testified at the trial of Thereseinstadt Commandant Karl Rahm and wrote and published a book of his experiences in Terezin: Il ghetto-modello di Eichmann (Theresienstadt: Eichmann's Model Ghetto), in 1961. He submitted the book to Israeli prosecutors to use at the Eichmann trial (Adolf Eichmann, SS officer in charge of the deportation of the Jews of Europe) a submission that went unused.

            Murmelstein had much valuable information to offer, especially on Eichmann So much so that if Murmelstein's testimony had been used it would have dispelled any notion of the dispassionate Nazi bureaucrat who only followed orders as defined by Hannah Arendt's term the "banality of evil." Instead we would have seen Eichmann as a man who loved his job and pursued it with zeal and passion above and beyond what was required by his superiors. We would also have seen a corrupt man who lined his own pockets with Jewish funds for both personal and professional gain, as the extra money afforded him the financial independence to run his department apart of the bureaucratic machine and away from the eyes of his superiors.

            So why is Murmelstein's story coming to light now and why did Lanzmann wait nearly 40 years to make this film? Possibly the world was not ready for such a controversial and ambivalent figure. In 1975 Lanzmann interviewed Murmelstein for a project he was working on which later became the critically acclaimed 9-hour documentary Shoah. The interviews show that Murmelstein lived in the center of what Primo Levi referred to as the "grey zone" in his book The Drowned and the Saved. Levi's theory is that those of us who did not experience the lager (camps) and ghettos cannot place ourselves in a position to judge those that were there, nor can we view the Holocaust as something that is black or white, good or evil. We simply cannot know what we would do to survive under the circumstances.


            Murmelstein is clear that he was no saint and that he loved power, danger and adventure that went with the job of being a Jewish community leader and later elder. But he also speaks in terms of the expectations that others had in times that were not ordinary. Murmelstein towards the end of the film tells Lanzmann that in Thereisenstadt there were no saints. "There were martyrs, but martyrs are not necessarily saints."
            Murmelstein points out that many people tried to conduct life as they had under normal circumstances but there was nothing normal about Thereseinstadt, the model ghetto the Nazis had created to fool the world and the Jews imprisoned there about the "Final Solution." While Murmelstein claims his intentions were to save as many Jews as he could, others viewed him as a tyrant, a collaborator, and a man who only cared about himself. Yet many times in the interviews Murmelstein speaks of the opportunities he had to escape with his family to England and to Palestine, but he remained feeling it was his responsibility.
            As the film begins we watch the now 87-year-old Lanzmann read from Murmelstein's book in Prague, Nisko, and Theresienstadt. One might wonder if this is an egotistical ploy by Lanzmann, but as the Murmelstein interviews unfold and the 3 1/2 hours go by we realize that Lanzmann has a real affection for Murmelstein, so much so he has become a surrogate witness. Lanzmann has become Murmelstein's voice, reading passages of his beautifully worded testimony in the places that Murmesltein describes, thus collapsing time, bringing past and present together in the same space, much as he did in Shoah.
            Here amidst the past and present we hear Murmelstein in his own words, we are drawn to Murmelstein much like Lanzmann is by his bold storytelling, his intelligence, knowledge of mythology, literature and history. He seems to be telling the truth about his experiences, admitting to his flaws and the perceptions of his decisions.
            The Last of the Unjust will not be remembered as a landmark documentary about the Holocaust like Shoah. Still, it is an important work that represents a different approach to Holocaust documentary. Lanzmann acts as a surrogate witness, in this case representing an extraordinary and at the same time flawed character steeped in moral ambivalence. Lanzmann offers the viewer a much more complex and deeper understanding of humanity during the Shoah by giving a voice to a survivor whose testimony was silenced by those who were not yet ready to hear what he had to say.
            Jodi Elowitz is the Outreach Coordinator for CHGS and the Program Coordinator for the European Studies Consortium. Elowitz is currently working on Holocaust memory in Poland and artistic representation of the Holocaust in animated short films.
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          • Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe

            1 Credit Topics Course Spring 2014
            ALL sessions and guest-speaker presentations are public
            Nolte 235
            Thursdays 3:00p.m. to 4:30p.m.

            This course will explore the particular developments and transnational entanglements of social memories in societies revisiting their legacies of dictatorship, state terror, and grave human rights violations in Latin America and Southern Europe.

            It will be organized in a series of lectures in which distinguished experts from the countries of study will discuss their work and engage in dialogue with local scholars and students on the contemporary processes of re-interpretation and re-framing of the atrocities as well as the transitional justice models adopted in their aftermaths.

            Coordinators:
            • Barbara Frey (Human Rights Program)
            • Alejandro Baer (Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Dept. of Sociology)
            • Ana Forcinito (Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese)


            January 23
            Barbara Frey (U of M)
            Transitional Justice and Human Rights
            February 6
            Pamela Yates and Paco de Onís (filmmakers)
            Screening and discussion of their film "Granito: How to Nail a Dictator" (Guatemala)
            February 20
            Alejandro Baer (U of M)
            The Collective Memory of Mass Atrocities
            March 6
            Mariana Achugar (Carnegie Mellon University)
            Uruguayan Memories of Dictatorship
            March 27
            Glenda Mazzarobba (UNDP rep. for the Brazilian Truth Commission)
            Reparations, Half Truths and Impunity
            April 10
            Emilio Crenzel (University of Buenos Aires) (tbc), Ana Forcinito, Leigh Payne (Oxford/U of M) Panel Discusion: The Evolving Memory of Argentina's "Disappeared"
            April 24
            Anna Forcinito (U of M)
            Art, Memory and HHRR
            May 8
            Francisco Ferrándiz (CSIC, Madrid)
            Unearthing Civil War Victims in Spain
            Institute for Advanced Studies Research Collaborative Reframing Mass Violence 2013/2014.
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          • The Recurrence of Genocide since the Holocaust

            A Lecture by Phillip Spencer
            Friday, December 6, 2013
            12:00 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Science Building

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            After the Holocaust, the Genocide Convention was aimed explicitly of ridding mankind of this 'odious scourge.' The Convention was, with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, one of the founding documents of the post-Holocaust era; but genocide recurs, and with alarming frequency, across almost every continent. Little has been done to prevent or halt the recurrence of this 'crime of crimes' and very few perpetrators have been brought to justice.

            In this lecture, Professor Spencer explores some of the reasons that have been put forward to account for these troubling failures, and reflects on what light our current understandings of the Holocaust can throw on the acute problem of genocide today.

            Professor Philip Spencer is Director of the Helen Bamber Centre for the Study of Rights, Conflict and Mass Violence, at Kingston University. The Centre, which he founded in 2004, provides a focus for research and teaching in these areas. It is named in honor of the veteran rights campaigner Helen Bamber, who has devoted her life to the victims of conflicts across the world.

            Professor Spencer's own research interests include the Holocaust; comparative genocide; nationalism; and anti-Semitism. He is also director of the university's European Research Department, where the central focus is on European political and cultural identity, with an overall concern for the changing forms, boundaries and future of Europe in the modern world.



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          • Antisemitism Then and Now

            Commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Kristallnacht
            Panel Discussion
            December 5, 2013
            4:00 p.m.
            President's Room Coffman Memorial Union
            University of Minnesota

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            Is there a new antisemitism? A growing body of reports and research centers claim that a new strain of antisemitism is sweeping the globe. Five renowned scholars in the field of antisemitism studies will discuss historic antisemitism, its long term after effects and contemporary manifestations in Europe and the US.

            Convened by Alejandro Baer, Director, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS) and Klaas van der Sanden, Interim Director, Center of Austrian Studies (CAS)

            Panel:
            Philip Spencer (Kingston University, UK, Historian).
            Chad Allan Goldberg (University of Wisconsin Madison, Sociologist)
            Zsolt Nagy (University of St. Thomas, Political Scientist,)
            Gary Cohen (University of Minnesota, Historian)
            Bruno Chaouat (University of Minnesota, French Literature & Thought, former Director, CHGS)

            Sponsored by: The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, The institute for Global Studies, The European Studies Consortium, Center for Jewish Studies, Center for German and European Studies, and the Jewish Community Relations Council


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          • An Argentine Genocide? Individual Accountability and Collective Guilt during 1976-83 Dictatorship

            A talk by Antonius Robben, Anthropology,
            Utrecht University
            Monday, November 25
            4:00p.m.
            125 Nolte Center

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            The sentencing of Argentine officers for carrying out genocide by disappearing tens of thousands of citizens has opened a public debate about agency and accountability during the 1976-83 military dictatorship. This presentation analyzes how this shift from gross human rights violations to genocide is having extensive implications for national memory, political responsibility, international law, and the concept of genocide.

            Antonius Robben (PhD, Berkeley, 1986) is Professor of Anthropology at Utrecht University and past President of the Netherlands Society of Anthropology. He has been a research fellow at the Michigan Society of Fellows, Ann Arbor, the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, New York, and the David Rockefeller Center, Harvard University. His most recent books include Political Violence and Trauma in Argentina (2005) that won the Textor Prize from the American Anthropological Association in 2006, and the edited volume Iraq at a Distance: What Anthropologists Can Teach Us About the War (2010).

            Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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          • Local Holocaust Survivor to Speak on Campus

            Dora Zaidenweber will speak on Thursday, November 21 at 2:15p.m.
            Room 155 Blegen Hall.

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            Zaidenweber will be sharing her story with students in History of the Holocaust course taught by visiting scholar Falko Schmieder. The talk will be open to the public to allow students, scholars, staff and interested individuals the opportunity to hear her speak about her experiences.

            Zaidenweber was born Dora Eiger on January 24, 1924 in Radom, Poland. Dora and her family were sent to the Radom ghetto in 1941. She was transported to Auschwitz in July 1944 where she remained until January of 1945 when she was evacuated on a forced march to Betgen Belsen where she was liberated in April of 1945. She and her husband Jules settled in Minnesota in 1950.

            Recently Dora and her family published her father's memoir Sky Tinged Red which is Isaia Eiger's chronicle of his two-and-a-half years as a prisoner in the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp during World War II.

            More information about Dora and her family can be found by clicking here.


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          • "The Concept of Survival" a lecture by Visiting Scholar Falko Schmieder

            Wednesday, November 20
            TIME CHANGE
            1:00 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences Building

            One aspect of the emergence of bio politics around 1800 is the formation of a temporalized meaning of, Survival', indicating a profound change in the understanding of being and its relation to time and politics. A well known linguistic expression of this change is the metaphor "survival of the fittest" which was a key element of Social Darwinist worldview.

            The Anthropologist and Ethnographer E.B.Tylor introduced another important concept: that of, "Survivals." As an important methodological tool of the new science of cultural anthropology this concept identifies and explores such elements of culture, which have their origins in pre-modern times and have a second life as inharmonious misfits in modernity, creating conditions of the synchronicity of the nonsynchronous.

            In his presentation Schmieder examine the significance of the temporalization of survival for different fields of knowledge, and, in a further step, will discuss some turning points of the subsequent history of this concept, which is still relevant for contemporary discourses.

            Falko Schmieder is a DAAD visiting professor at the University of Minnesota and is currently teaching the course "History of the Holocaust." He has studied Communications, Political Science and Sociology at various German Universities. Since 2005 he has worked as a researcher at the Center for Literary and Cultural Research Berlin.

            Co sponsored by the Center for German and European Studies.

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          • The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies is grieved by the loss of Myron Kunin

            It was Myron's passion for art that brought him together with Stephen Feinstein. Together they curated Witness and Legacy, a major commemorative art exhibition to mark the 50th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz that debuted in St. Paul in 1995 and traveled until 2002. That collaboration began the friendship and vision that lead to the founding of our Center in 1997.

            We will honor Myron's his legacy as we strive to fulfill our mission of educating all sectors of society about the Holocaust and other genocides.

            May his memory be a blessing on us all.


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          • History, Memory and Pedagogy

            An Educator Workshop on the Occasion of the 75th Anniversary of Kristallnacht
            November 9, 2013
            9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
            115 Blegen Hall
            Free and open to educators K-16
            Registration required by clicking here.

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            This one-day professional development workshop is a follow-up to the Holocaust in European Memory Summer Institute that took place on July 8-11, 2013 at the University of Minnesota. That workshop examined questions such as how the Nazi murder of European Jews became "The Holocaust." How the story is conveyed through public memorials, school curricula, art, literature and film. How the Holocaust has been contextualized and rendered meaningful within the diversity of European nations and in the distant US.

            We will continue the discussions we started this summer by exploring the specific connections between history, memory and education in the contemporary world. We will examine history and memory as it deals with the genocide of the Roma, communal gatherings and ceremonies dedicated to commemorate the Holocaust and reflections on the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht, which is considered the official catalyst for the Holocaust. ( Attendance at the July institute is not required for the November 9, workshop.)


            Introduction
            Kristallnacht and the Duties of Memory: Remarks Alejandro Baer
            Alejandro Baer is the director and Stephen C. Feinstein Chair of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at the University of Minnesota. He has authored numerous articles addressing issues of genocide, memory, and antisemitism
            Lecture
            The Roma Genocide and Memory: Lecture by William Duna
            William A. Duna is an American Gypsy descended from Hungarian musicians who emigrated to the U. S. in 1893. Duna has taught music, written and performed, and has served as an entertainment consultant. He has written and lectured about the Roma people and was appointed by Ronald Reagan as the first Roma to serve on the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Council in 1987.
            Presentation
            "Holocaust Commemorations for the Broader Community"
            Presentation by Deborah Petersen-Perlman
            Deborah Petersen Perlman Associate Professor Communications, University of Minnesota Duluth and coordinates the Baeumler-Kaplan Holocaust Commemoration.
            Sponsored by The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Institute for Global Studies, European Studies Consortium
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          • 2013 Badzin Fellowship winner and PhD Sociology candidate Wahutu Siguru to present at the next HGMV workshop

            "The Politics of Representation: Genocide, Mass Violence and Atrocities in the Media."
            Wahutu Siguru
            Holocaust Genocide & Mass Violence Studies Workshop (HGMV)
            Thursday, October 31
            3:00 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences Building

            Wahutu Siguru's project takes a constructivist perspective on knowledge production in an attempt to explicate how knowledge about instances of mass violence, atrocities and genocide is produced and disseminated by the media. It begins from the understanding that representations are based on particular memory, social and knowledge structures leveraging multiple theories to investigate the effects of these on representations. This particular project is the first step towards a larger project that investigates differences and similarities in narratives about Rwanda and Darfur by the media in multiple countries within and outside of Africa.

            Siguru's research interests are in the Sociology of Media, Genocide, Mass Violence and Atrocities (specifically on issues of representation of conflicts in Africa such as Darfur and Rwanda), Collective Memory, and perhaps somewhat tangentially Democracy and Development in Africa.

            The workshop was founded in 2012 to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory.

            For more information about participation in the workshop please email Wahutau Siguru at siguru@umn.edu.




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          • CHGS Newsletter Highlight:Interview with Visiting Professor Falko Schmieder

            "Students here seem to have a more emotional connection to the Holocaust"

            Falko Schmieder is a DAAD visiting professor at the University of Minnesota and is currently teaching the course "History of the Holocaust." He has studied Communications, Political Science and Sociology at various German Universities. Since 2005 he has worked as a researcher at the Center for Literary and Cultural Research Berlin. Together with Matthias Rothe, the course "Adorno, Foucault, and beyond" is being offered through the Department of German, Scandinavian and Dutch. Falko Schmieder will give a lecture at the CHGS Library (room 710 Social Sciences) on The Concept of Survival on November 20th at 12 p.m.

            What are the main differences between students in the US and in Germany regarding knowledge of and attitude towards the Holocaust?

            After my first experiences here I would say the German students tend to know more about the historical preconditions of the Holocaust, especially the long tradition of religious anti-Judaism, and, of course they have more detailed information about German History in general. On the other hand, the students here seem to have a more emotional connection and a more political access to the subject. Many of them have come in contact with Holocaust survivors in High school, as part of their educational training, and because of the many Holocaust Survivors who emigrated to the US and started a new life here it's a more deeper innervated history. By the way, I am very fortunate to have the Holocaust Survivor Dora Zaidenweber coming to my class to speak this semester. I attended the presentation of her book The Sky Tinged Red, and was moved to learn about her personal story. I was astonished how many young people attended this program.



            What do you expect your students to come out of your course?
            I would like to make them aware of two things in particular: First, that modern antisemitism has a long prehistory, which is not limited to German history; and second, that antisemitism is in no way a thing of the past. Although it might have changed some of its features, it is still relevant today - at the end of my lecture I will deal with the phenomenon of antisemitism without Jews, and I will discuss some examples of contemporary reactions on the banking crisis in Germany, in which you clearly can find a revival of old antisemitic stereotypes.
            How do you approach these sensitive and difficult issues in the classroom?
            In the first class, when I introduced myself to the students, I showed some photographs that I took in Berlin shortly before coming to Minneapolis. These photographs show two Berlinian Jewish institutions, and how they are monitored by surveillance cameras and by the police. The American students were very surprised to learn that it's still necessary to constantly protect Jewish organizations and sites in this country, because of the fear (and possibility) of antisemitic attacks.
            How does Holocaust studies relate to your current research?
            My current research project is on the History of the Concept of Survival, for which the Holocaust and its aftermath is of great importance. The rupture in history is reflected in the invention of many new concepts: think of "survivor syndrome," "survivor guilt" and others, or in the disruption of traditional meanings of concepts. It is revealing that Claude Lanzmann or the well-known Spanish writer and Holocaust Survivor Jorge Semprún replaced the term "survivor" with "revenant" because older meanings of survival or survivorship no longer seemed appropriate to deal with the traumatic experiences in the extermination camps.
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          • Law's Labor's Lost: Constitutional Revolution and the Problem of Radical Social Change

            Professor Mark Goodale, Anthropology and Conflict Studies, George Mason University
            Thursday, October 17
            3:30 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences

            How do the regulating logics of law constrain forms of violence that often accompany revolutionary movements, and how do these logics at the same time constrain the kind of creative social and political practices that are necessary for real transformation? Scholars have shown how human rights can be used to bring authoritarian leaders to justice and shape progressive forms of governance. But when international norms are domesticated through national legal processes, their role in facilitating deep and structural transformation is more fraught with ambiguity and contradiction.

            Mark Goodale is an anthropologist, socio-legal scholar, and social theorist. He is Associate Professor of Conflict Analysis and Anthropology at George Mason University and Series Editor of Stanford Studies in Human Rights. Goodale is author and editor of numerous books and field projects and has an upcoming critical introduction to anthropology and law and an ethnography of revolution, folk cosmopolitanism, and neo-Burkeanism, in Bolivia.

            Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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          • Dr. Vahram Shemmassian to Speak at The 2013 Ohanessian Chair Lecture

            Thursday, October 17
            7:00 p.m.
            President's Room
            Coffman Memorial Union

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            Dr. Vahram Shemmassian is an associate professor and the director of the Armenian Studies Program at California State University, Northridge. He is the foremost scholar on Musa Dagh the site of the famed resistance during the Armenian genocide.

            Professor Shemmassian will talk about the resistance and the genocide in his presentation "The Musa Dagh Resistance to the Armenian Genocide and Its Impact through Franz Werfel's Historical Novel The Forty Days of Musa Dagh."

            Franz Werfel (1890-1945), Austrian poet, modernist playwright, and novelist, was born in Prague, the son of a Jewish merchant. During World War I, Werfel served for several years on the Russian front as a soldier in the Austrian army. His novel The Forty Days of Musa Dagh published in 1933 detailed the mass murder and expulsion of Armenians from eastern Anatolia in 1915. The novel received much attention in the United States standing as a warning against future acts of mass murder and won lasting respect from Armenian communities throughout the world.

            Sponsored by: The Institute for Global Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, College of Liberal Arts, Critical Asian Studies, Study of the Asias.

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          • German-Jewish Writer Esther Dischereit to visit the University

            "Racist Killings and Mourning Songs"
            Reading and Discussion with German-Jewish Writer Esther Dischereit
            Tuesday, October 8
            11:30 a.m.
            125 Nolte Centre

            Recently, the discovery of 10 years of racist killings by the "National Socialist Underground" (NSU), a neo-Nazi underground guerrilla organization, has shocked the German public. Dischereit has since become the most important independent voice for the public, extensively covering the legal and political investigations of this unprecedented crime in post-war Germany involving police, secret service, politicians and state officials. Unlike standard media coverage Dischereit wants to let the voices of the victims and their families be heard. The Mourning Songs tell each story of a murder from the families' unique and painful perspective and memory, and challenge racism and xenophobia wherever it is to be found; out on the streets or inside official state institutions. Dischereit, who conducted countless interviews with the victims' families, voices her perspective of telling and mourning for the victims of various ethnic backgrounds. The Mourning Songs is one part of Dischereits' unique libretto project "Mourning Songs - Flowers for Otello: On the Crime of Jena" which has just been produced for the German radio by Deutschlandradio Kultur.

            Esther Dischereit is one of the most exciting writers and thought-provoking public intellectuals in Germany today. Her poems, novels, essays, films, plays, and radio plays, and her opera libretti and sound installations offer unique insights into Jewish life in contemporary Europe. Dischereit, who was born into a survivor's family, is an artist of the Second Generation, who analyzes power relationships surrounding the body, femininity, expressions of minorities, and the different functions and forms of remembrance, ritual, and memory. Dischereit often initiates cross art projects for which she collaborates with composers, musicians, dancers and graphic art designers.

            Please join us for the reading (in German, English, and Turkish) and discussion (English) of this unique, critical, and contemporary work, and meet Esther Dischereit and the translator Iain Galbraith.
            Sponsored by: German, Scandinavian & Dutch, Center for Jewish Studies, Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, Center for German and European Studies.
            For more information: Amanda Haugen, E-mail: gsd@umn.edu, Phone: 612-625-2080
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          • Courtney Gildersleeve PhD candidate to present at the next CHGS workshop

            "Poetry, Damaged Life, and One Poem by Agha Shahid Ali"
            Courtney Gildersleeve
            Holocaust Genocide & Mass Violence Studies Workshop (HGMV)
            Thursday, October 3
            Room 710 Social Sciences

            Courtney Gildersleeve is a PhD Student and Teaching Assistant in the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature. Working broadly in the field of Post-Colonial Studies, and with a commitment to the tradition of historical materialism, she examines the ways that literature and especially poetry has played a role in anti-colonial struggle and continually seeks to reckon with the long history of colonialism and violence that has shaped the modern world. Although her work is decidedly comparative, her dissertation research foregrounds the history, literature, and anti-colonial thought of the Caribbean.

            While focusing primarily on writers from Cuba, Martinique, and Haiti, she studies texts that emerged from or in response to the Transatlantic slave trade, those that address the labor of African peoples in the Americas, and those that grapple with the continuing cost of 'intervention' by many other nations in the Caribbean. In addition to the presentation she will give at the HGMV workshop, which parts ways with this historical context, this semester she is also working on a project that offers a critical perspective on recent efforts--particularly in the former slave-trading city of Bordeaux--to memorialize the leader of the Haitian Revolution, Toussaint Louverture, and the struggles of that revolution.


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          • Professor from University of Antioquia (Medellín-Colombia) to present at CHGS Workshop

            Sandra Gómez Santamaría will present at the first meeting of the 2013 Holocaust Genocide & Mass Violence Studies Workshop, taking place on Thursday, September 19, in Room 710 Social Sciences.

            Sandra Gómez Santamaría is a Human Rights professor involved in the University of Minnesota-Antioquia Human Rights partnership. She has a Master of Arts degree in Sociology of Law from the Oñati International Institute from the Sociology of Law (IISL, Basque Country-Spain) and she received a Law degree from University of Antioquia (Medellín-Colombia). She also has experience working as researcher on human rights in the Colombian Commission of Jurist, a human rights NGO in Colombia. Her áreas of interest includes Human Rights, Sociolegal studies, critical legal theories, Anthropology of the State and Cultural Studies.

            The workshop was founded in 2012 by CHGS, the Human Rights Program and the Department of Sociology to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory.

            For more information about particpation in the workshop please email Wahutau Siguru at siguru@umn.edu.



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          • The Discovery of the "New World" and Traditions of Othering

            A lecture by Pedro Martínez García
            September 20, 2013
            Room 1210 Heller Hall
            12:15 p.m.

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            The arrival of the Castilian caravels in 1492 on the coast and islands which at first sight were identified as the Orient and the resulting encounters with the first natives oddly coincides with the end of the so called "coexistence of the three cultures" in the kingdoms of the Iberian Peninsula. Contemporary Christian Castilians set aside their Jewish and their Morisco others to engage with "new others" in unchartered territories, where concepts like conversion, conquista and cohabitation evolved and were adapted to new contexts. This moment is often considered a symbolic turning point between the Middle Ages and Modernity.

            In his talk, Dr. Martinez will focus on the traditions of othering in the early modern Iberian Atlantic World, paying special attention to the European perceptions of the natives of the "New World" through chronicles and travel narratives.

            Pedro Martínez García is a lecturer in the Chair of Early modern History, University of Bayreuth, Germany.

            Since 2008, he has been writing his dissertation entitled "Face to Face with the Other: Travel Narratives and Alterity from the Late Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period"
            at the University of Valladolid (Spain) and the University of Bayreuth (Germany).

            Sponsored by: Center for Holocaust and Genocides Studies, Center for Early Modern History, Department of Spanish and Portuguese.


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          • Syrian Event to be aired Today on MPR

            Countering Mass Atrocities in Syria: Between Human Rights Ideals and Geo-Political Concerns will be broadcast today, Thursday, September 12 at noon.

            To listen to the program please click here.

            The program, sponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Human Rights Program was in the form of a panel discussion featuring: Sarah Parkinson, Assistant Professor. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Ragui Assaad, Professor, Planning and Public Affairs at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Ron Krebs, Associate Professor Department of Political Science, Dr. Wael Khouli and Mazen Halibi, members of the Syrian community.

            The discussion was moderated by Barbara Frey, Director Human Rights Program and introduced by Alejandro Baer, Director Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

            Sponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Human Rights Program and Institute for Global Studies and the Institute for Advanced Studies.






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          • Syria: If Not Now When?

            By Alejandro Baer

            "If I am not for myself, then who will be for me? And if I am only for myself, then what am I? And if not now, when?" Said Rabbi Hillel, one of the most influential sages and scholars in Jewish history.

            It is unlikely that Barak Obama had this phrase of the Talmud in mind last week during the Moscow's G20 summit. However, he seems to have performed a political interpretation of this often quoted Jewish aphorism when he tried to convince his fellow world leaders of the necessity of joint military action against the criminal Assad regime in Syria.

            The figures of the Syrian tragedy are well known. 100,000 people killed in two years, two million refugees living in bordering countries, four million displaced within the country and, only a few weeks ago, a lethal chemical weapons attack against the civilian population, in a clear violation of international law. No other government has dared to cross the line of chemical weapons use since the 1980s. The situation has reached a tipping point and it requires a meaningful response by the international community. But what sort of action should be taken?

            It seems we are always fighting the previous genocide. Violence unfolding before our eyes usually lacks the unambiguous quality of retrospective moral outrage, naming and condemnation. It is entangled in a complex constellation of forces and unpredictable developments that lead to the fact that the realpolitik, immediate interests and geopolitical concerns are weighted against human rights ideals.

            What will be the consequences of military action in Syria? Have all other measures and means of pressure been exhausted? Will the envisioned bombing raids serve to protect civilians?

            On September 11 the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Human Rights Program will host a panel discussion in which Syrian community members, experts and scholars will discuss ways to take action without vast and devastating consequences.

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          • CHGS and the Program for Human Rights Announce Program on Syria

            Countering Mass Atrocities in Syria: Between Human Rights Ideals and Geo-Political Concerns
            Wednesday, September 11
            4:00 p.m.
            Note: Room Change:
            125 Willey Hall

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            As the situation in Syria grows evermore difficult, maintaining its position in center stage as the world watches mass atrocities unfold, tensions over what action to take (or not to take) continue to escalate. Russia stands firm in its decision to block a UN backed intervention, and the United States looks to take matters into its own hands with military action. In the anticipation of a potential confrontation, experts and scholars hope to find a way to take action without vast and devastating consequences.

            Panelists:
            Sarah Parkinson, Assistant Professor. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Ragui Assaad, Professor, Planning and Public Affairs at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Ron Krebs, Associate Professor Department of Political Science, Dr. Wael Khouli and Mazen Halibi, members of the Syrian community.

            Moderated by Barbara Frey, Director Human Rights Program and Alejandro Baer, Director Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

            Sponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Human Rights Program and Institute for Global Studies.

            For more information contact: 612-624-9007

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          • 2013 Holocaust Genocide & Mass Violence Studies Workshops Announced

            The Center for Holocaust & genocide Studies, the Human rights Program and the Department of Sociology have just released the fall semester schedule for the Holocaust, Genocide & Mas violence Workshops for graduate students and faculty.

            The first meeting will take place on Thursday, September 19, in Room 710 Social Sciences.

            The workshop was founded in 2012 to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory.

            Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process.

            Engage in dialogue with invited scholars.

            Twelve students, visiting professors and faculty members gave papers throughout the 2012-2013 academic school year. A complete list of presenters and topics is available by clicking the following link.

            For more information about particpation in the workshop please email Wahutau Siguru at siguru@umn.edu.

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          • A Nazi in our Midst?

            A Nazi in our midst? Pursuit of justice must persistArticle by Alejandro Baer June 17, 2013
            Star Tribune


            If he is connected with war crimes, he must be held accountable.

            Until Friday, 94-year-old Michael Karkoc was only an immigrant living the quiet and peaceful life of a retiree in northeast Minneapolis. He was known as a loving father and grandfather, a longtime member of the Ukrainian immigrant community, a citizen who attended church regularly, always friendly and considerate toward his neighbors.

            But soon Karkoc will be subject to the full force of the law, suspected of the worst imaginable of crimes. Karkoc is alleged to have been a top commander of a Nazi SS-led unit accused of burning villages filled with women and children. It seems that the evidence is strong enough for him to face deportation and to be prosecuted for war crimes in Germany or Poland.

            How could this man immigrate to the United States after the war and live a normal life in Minnesota for six decades? According to an extensive investigation by the Associated Press, Karkoc fooled the American authorities in 1949, concealing his role as an officer and founding member of the infamous Ukrainian Self Defense Legion.

            To read the entire article click here.

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          • Immigration to America: the 1948 Displaced Persons Act

            By Jodi Elowitz June 17, 2013

            The startled reaction to the news that Michael Karkoc, an alleged former Nazi is living in Northeast Minneapolis is understandable. To have a Nazi in our midst is unsettling and leads to the larger question of how it is possible for someone who (if found guilty of war crimes) could have lived in the Twin Cities for 70 years undetected.

            In terms of what happens next, the United States needs to investigate Karkoc's denial of military service on the application form he filed in order to immigrate to the United States.

            Karkoc was admitted into this country under the 1948 Displaced Persons Act, designed to authorize for a limited period of time the admission into the United States of certain European displaced persons for permanent residence and or other purposes.

            After World War II there were more than 250,000 Jewish displaced persons between 1945 and 1952 living in DP camps throughout Germany and Austria, waiting to regain their lives after the Holocaust. At first the thought was to return them to their countries of origin but most had no homes or families to go back to, and antisemitism remained problematic. The Displaced Persons Act at first was not specific or favorable to the Jewish DP's and many Jews continued to wait to immigrate to the United States. It was not until 1950 that the act was amended and Jews had more accessibility to emigrate. By 1952 80,000 displaced Jews made it to the US with the additional aid of Jewish relief agencies. Of those 80,000 it is believed that roughly three to four hundred made Minnesota their new home.

            Life in Minnesota was not easy for the new Jewish immigrants, jobs were hard to come by and the larger community did not quite understand what these refugees had experienced during the war. Most did not speak of their Holocaust experiences until much later, when people began to ask and wanted to hear about what they witnessed.

            When the news of Karkoc's alleged Nazi past appeared on every Minnesota news and media outlet, local Holocaust survivors began to speak up, hoping that if he did indeed commit these crimes against his fellow Ukrainians and Poles, murdering women and children, that he would be brought to justice. Many wondered how he was able to slip into this country under the act that was designed to help people who had been victims of Nazi persecution and could not return home. As one survivor said, "The fact that he was let into the US and has lived a relatively quiet and happy life is problematic because justice has not been served."

            Sources for this article: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Encyclopedia, University of Washington Bothel Library.

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          • Representing Genocide Videos on CHGS YouTube Channel

            On April 5th and 6th, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, hosted the symposium, Representing Genocide: Media, Law and Scholarship, to explore the intersections between journalistic, judicial and social scientific depictions of atrocities, with a focus on cases of the Holocaust, Darfur and Rwanda. The symposium was was recorded and is now available to be viewed on the Center's YouTube channel by clicking here.

            The symposium was organized by the Center's Director, Alejandro Baer, and Professor of Sociology, Joachim Savelsberg, and made possible by the Wexler Special Events fund for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Center for Austrian Studies, The Center for German and European Studies and several other centers and departments across the university(for a complete list click here).

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          • Scripting the Shoah presented by Aomar Boum now Available to View on line

            On April 11, 2013 Professor Aomar Boum presented an overview of his research dealing with the Holocaust in Moroccan official and public discourses. The recording of this presentation is now available for viewing on the CHGS YouTube channel. You can access the video by clicking here.

            The lecture was a collaboration between CHGS and the Center for Jewish Studies.

            Using archival material and ethnographic interviews, Professor Boum argued that North African and Moroccan perspectives about the Holocaust are part of what he calls the durable structures of acceptance and minimization. Using Bourdieu's habitus, Boum claims that Moroccan debates about the Holocaust have been framed and ossified in a context of social and political pre-dispositions of minimization of the Holocaust generating typological and conflicting scripts. Therefore, when individuals go against the grain and question this habitus, they are perceived as going against the principles of regular continuity that has governed the Arab/Moroccan critique of Israeli policies towards Palestinians.

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          • Eric Harkleroad PhD Candidate in Anthropology to Present at CHGS Workshop

            Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies
            Thursday, May 9
            3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
            710 Social Sciences

            Eric Harkleroad will present "Warfare and Society: Archaeology's Contribution to the Discussion."

            Eric's research focuses on situating warfare within the social sphere to examine its changing place in the daily life of Iron Age people in Southern Britain. His dissertation takes a regional look at how warfare, or the symbolic representations of warfare, is distributed across the landscape at different sites and how this changes through time. The work he is presenting uses a different scale focusing on one site and trying to understand how warfare fits into society at one specific site. Additionally he will address the relevance of Anthropology and Archaeology to the interests of the HGMV workshop.

            This the last workshop of the 2012-2013 school year. The workshop will resume in September of 2013. For more information on how you can participate next year please email Alejandro Baer at abaer@umn.edu.

            Special thanks to Shannon Golden for facilitating and organizing the workshops this year.

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          • Holocaust and Genocide Courses Being Offered for Summer and Fall

            Registration for University of Minnesota's summer and fall semester is now open with a number of courses that fall within the Center's interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Holocaust and genocide.

            Please register for the University of Minnesota Course offerings below at the One Stop Home Page.

            For a complete list of potential courses click on the following link: Holocaust and Genocide Courses Offered at the University of Minnesota.pdf

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          • Wahutu Siguru awarded Badzin Fellowship

            The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Department of History, are pleased to announce the Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies has been awarded to Wahuta Siguru.

            Siguru's research interests are in the Sociology of Media, Genocide, Mass Violence and Atrocities (specifically on issues of representation of conflicts in Africa such as Darfur and Rwanda), Collective Memory, and perhaps somewhat tangentially Democracy and Development in Africa.

            Siguru was born and raised in Mombasa, Kenya and attended Moi University Law School from 2003-2007 and moved to Minnesota in 2007 completing a double major in Sociology and Global Studies at the University of Minnesota in 2010.

            He spent a year doing research with Professor Tade Okediji, (University of Minnesota Applied Economics) on ethnicity and ethnic group formation in Africa, which resulted in a co-authored paper presented at the 2013 Africa Conference in Austin Texas. The paper will also be presented at the African Studies Association Conference in Baltimore Maryland later this year.

            Siguru began coursework towards a PhD in Sociology at the University of Minnesota in 2011 and is currently analyzing data collected in the summer of 2012 in Johannesburg and Nairobi which has resulted in a co-authored paper with Professor Joachim Savelsberg on Representations of Darfur in Western and African Media; this will be presented at the 2013 American Sociological Association Conference in New York.

            The Badzin Fellowship pays a living stipend of $18,000, and the cost of tuition, mandatory fees and health insurance. An applicant must be a current student in a Ph.D. program in the College of Liberal Arts, currently enrolled in the first, second, third, or fourth year of study, and have a doctoral dissertation project in Holocaust and genocide studies.

            The fellowship is awarded on the basis of the quality and scholarly potential of the dissertation project, the applicant's quality of performance in the graduate program, and the applicant's general scholarly promise.




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          • Alejandro Baer to Present at USHMM Symposium

            Alejandro Baer, CHGS will participate in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Symposium, Sephardic Jewry and the Holocaust: The Future of the Field
            April 28-30, 2013
            University of Washington, Seattle

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            The symposium is part of the year long commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the opening of the Museum. Co-organized through the Sephardic Studies Initiative of the University of Washington's Samuel & Althea Stroum Jewish Studies Program and the Museum's Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, this symposium explores the unique history of Sephardic Jewry and the Holocaust.

            Professor Baer will present The Voids of the Sephard: the Memory of the Holocaust in Spain.



            Abstract of Dr. Baer's Paper:
            The Holocaust did not take place within Spain's borders. Isolated and detached from the tragedy that consumed the rest of the European continent, Spain at that time was essentially submerged in the trauma of her own Civil War and its aftermath. When Spain finally emerged from the grip of Franco's dictatorship, the country's democracy was rebuilt on the margins of the prevailing European value system, in which the memory of Auschwitz and its ilk occupy a central place. It is only in the last decade, as a consequence of both institutional initiatives and the effects of cultural and educational transnationalization, that Spain has been progressively absorbed into the wider European debate about history, culture, and memory. As a result, discussions about the Holocaust have gained a more significant presence in Spanish public life. The process is an arduous one because it requires Spain to liberate itself from the shackles of its own past, specifically from the mantle of ignorance and prejudice that, until very recently, has covered everything related to Jews.
            More information on the symposium can be found by clicking here.
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          • Hiromi Mizuno professor in the Department of History to present at next CHGS workshop

            Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies
            Thursday, April 25:
            3:30-5:00 p.m. 710 Social Sciences

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            "When Crimes Cannot Be Punished: the Comfort Women Issue and International Human Rights Law"

            Hiromi Mizuno, Associate Professor, Department of History and CHGS advisory board member will present on her latest research.

            If you are interested in participating in the workshop please contact Shannon Golden at golde118@umn.edu.

            Remaining Workshop Schedule:

            May 3: Friday, 12:00-1:30 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)
            Courtney Gildersleeve

            May 9: Thursday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)
            Eric Harkleroad


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          • Doctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Austrian Studies, Matthias Falter to present at next CHGS workshop

            The "Antifascist consensus" and the "club of political correctness." Addressing National Socialism in Austrian parliamentary debates on right-wing extremism
            Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies
            Thursday, April 11
            3:30-5:00 p.m.
            609 Social Sciences

            Foto Matthias Falter.jpg

            Matthias Falter is political scientist and BMWF Doctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Austrian Studies of the University of Minnesota. His main fields of research are political theory, especially Critical Theory and the political thought of Hannah Arendt, historic and contemporary antisemitism, right-wing extremism and parliamentarianism. In his dissertation, Matthias Falter examines Austrian parliamentary discourse on right-wing extremism and underlying concepts of political community. On Thursday, he will talk about the memory of National Socialism as point of reference in contemporary Austrian parliamentary debates on right-wing extremism and the related struggles over politics of remembrance.

            If you are interested in participating in the workshop please contact Shannon Golden at golde118@umn.edu.

            Remaining Workshop Schedule:

            April 25: Thursday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)
            Hiromi Mizuno, "When Crimes Cannot Be Punished: the Comfort Women Issue and International Human Rights Law"

            May 3: Friday, 12:00-1:30 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)
            Courtney Gildersleeve

            May 9: Thursday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)
            Eric Harkleroad

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          • Scripting the Shoah: The Holocaust in Moroccan Official and Public Discourses

            Aomar Boum, Assistant Professor, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies and Religious studies Program, University of Arizona
            April 11, 2013
            Room 1210 Heller Hall
            5:30 p.m.

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            Since the end of WWII, the Holocaust has been a prominent issue in Arab political and intellectual discourse. Although this issue has largely played out in Egypt, Syria and Lebanon, it has also been an integral part of the North African debate in general and the Moroccan anti-Israeli and Zionist discussions in particular by the early years of Independence.

            Using archival material and ethnographic interviews, Professor Boum will argue that North African and Moroccan perspectives about the Holocaust are part of what he calls the durable structures of acceptance and minimization. Using Bourdieu's habitus, Boum claims that Moroccan debates about the Holocaust have been framed and ossified in a context of social and political pre-dispositions of minimization of the Holocaust generating typological and conflicting scripts. Therefore, when individuals go against the grain and question this habitus, they are perceived as going against the principles of regular continuity that has governed the Arab/Moroccan critique of Israeli policies towards Palestinians.



            Dr. Aomar Boum was born and raised in the oasis of Mhamid, Foum Zguid (Province of Tata, southern Morocco). As a socio-cultural anthropologist, his main research focuses on how Moroccan Muslims remember, picture, and construct Jewishness and Moroccan Judaism. Dr. Boum has written a number of entries on the Jews of southern Morocco in The Encyclopedia of Jews in the Islamic World; he also published on ethnic folk dances and nationalism, traditional Islamic and modern education, as well as on hip-hop and youth dissent in Morocco, and youth culture.
            Sponsored by: The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Center for Jewish Studies, Institute for Advanced Studies.
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          • Illumintated Memory

            A group exhibition of student artwork on Holocaust remembrance organized by Kathy Carlisle, Visual Arts Instructor at St. Francis High School in Sacramento,California.

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            Exhibition Dates
            April 2 - 13, 2013
            Public Reception
            Friday, April 12, 6:00 - 8:00 pm

            Quarter Gallery, Regis Center for Art
            Gallery hours are 11 am to 7 pm, Tuesday through Saturday.

            The project showcases the collective work of Photography One and Two students at St. Francis High School during the Spring semester, 2012. This conceptual photography assignment required students to engage in historical research about the Holocaust and to create symbolic photographic imagery in response to their research. An exploration of artists employing symbolism, metaphor, and allegory in historical and contemporary art established the foundation of the project. Students then began their work by expanding their knowledge of the Holocaust from 1933 to 1945 through personal and collaborative research and class assignments.

            The students' creative challenges began as they refined their research to focus on a single personal narrative from a survivor or someone who had perished in the Holocaust. They were asked to personally assess and symbolize the essence of that single person's story through photographic imagery. Students were limited to a palette of sepia or black and white photography, using only tonal value to describe the depth and breadth of their concept. The final step of the project required students to write an artist's statement about their work, explaining their creative process and its connection to their research.

            Illuminated Memory is an outstanding educational model for linking historical study and artistic interpretation in remembrance of the Holocaust. This project demonstrates the vital and expansive role that visual art can play in the education and ethical development of high school students. Writing about her teaching methods, Kathy Carlisle observed, "the Holocaust teaches us indelible lessons about racism that are highly relevant today. Students resonate strongly with core moral choices and social justice lessons that the tragedy of the Holocaust teaches us. Linking art to social justice issues allows students to reciprocally connect their studies in language, history, and ethics to their work in visual media."
            Students in the exhibition include: Liz Arikawa, Brinnley Barthels, Theresa Bersin, Maddy Boone, Ryanne Brust, Valerie Calhoun, Carly Carpenter, Sidney Castro, Alexey Chandler, Sara Cherazi, Anna Dahl, Kylee Espena, Alicia Flynt, Eileen Frame, Karly Hammack, Katie Garnett, Chloe Hakim, Jacqueline Holben, Grace Hollingsworth, Sarah Huber, Sameenah Khan, Jordanne Kirschke, Ellie Keenan, Rachel Kornelly, Petie Kuppenbender, Meghan Lawrence, Nhi Le, Mollie Leal, Harkie Mand, Alison Marchi, Rachel Merkle, Macee Moreno, Hibba Munir, Anya Musilli-Olmsted, Bianca Quiroz, Nicole Read, Meghan Rice, Gabriela Riegos, Sophia Rubino, Noelle Santana, Pilar Sbisa, Amanda Schnabel, Jatika Singh, Marcela Sosa, Natalie Vann, Maxi Wilson, A.J. Woo.
            Kathy Carlisle, a Visual Arts Instructor at St. Francis High School in Sacramento, California, led this project and organized the exhibition. She died unexpectedly on December 8, 2012 when she was struck by a train while taking photographs. Kathy Carlisle studied at the Parsons School of Design in New York and at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and completed B.A. and M.A. degrees at California State University, Sacramento. In 2012 she received a fellowship to attend the Summer Seminar on Holocaust Education at the Memorial Library in New York. This presentation at the University of Minnesota is dedicated to the life and legacy of Kathy Carlisle.
            For more on the project please click here.
            Sponsored by: Art, Katherine E. Nash Gallery,Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, Central Valley Holocaust Educators Network and St. Francis High School of Sacramento, CA.
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          • CHGS Announces Symposium on Representation of Genocide

            Representing Genocide: Media, Law and Scholarship
            April 5 & 6, 2013
            Mondale Hall -The Law School
            Friday, April 5, 9:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. Room 20
            Saturday, April 6, 9:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m. Room 50
            Free and open to the public. Registration closed. Walk ins welcome, space is limited. Registration on Friday between 9:00 a.m. and 9:30.


            img004.jpg

            The symposium will address journalistic, judicial and social scientific depictions of atrocities with a focus on cases of the Holocaust, Darfur, and Rwanda. It seeks to explore the intersections between these different discursive fields and case studies to shed light on the increasing tension between the local and global representations and memories of mass murder.

            The particular ways in which current genocides are represented have critical consequences for the responses and interventions offered by the rest of the world. This has been evident in both Darfur and Rwanda, where the framing of the events and the labels and definitions used by the media and scholarship to describe them (such as "tribal violence") had a detachment effect and did not favor any sort of intervention to halt the atrocities. Reversely, references to the Holocaust in the representation of contemporary mass atrocities--so-called "metaphorical bridging"--can also crucially impact the process of intervention, as the case of Bosnia has demonstrated.




            Few attempts have been made to specifically highlight the connection between representations of past mass atrocities and their actual impact on unfolding events of mass violence. An examination of this urgent question is an essential component of global progress towards human rights goals and the prevention or reduction of future political violence. Moreover, while there is an important body of work on Holocaust memory as such, the symposium will explore when and how promoting public awareness and memory of mass atrocities through distinct institutions (the media, the judiciary and academic scholarship) can lead to effective anti-genocide policies.
            Conference Organizers:
            Alejandro Baer, Director and Stephen C. Feinstein Chair Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, University of Minnesota
            Joachim Savelsberg, Professor of Sociology, University of Minnesota
            Participating Scholars:
            Fredrico Finchelstein, Associate Professor of History at the New School for Social Research and Eugene Lang College
            John Hagan, John D. MacArthur Professor, Northwestern University
            Jens Meierhenrich, Senior Lecturer in International Relations, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE/ Princeton University
            Bella Mody, James de Castro Chair in Global Media Studies, Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Colorado
            Mark Osiel, Aliber Family Chair in Law, University of Iowa
            Devin Pendas, Associate Professor History, Boston College
            Natan Sznaider, Professor of Sociology, Academic College of Tel-Aviv-Yaffo
            Allan Thompson, Assistant Professor Journalism and Communication, Carleton University
            Schedule: Schedule_Symposium Representing Genocide (1).pdf
            The Symposium is made possible by the Wexler Special Events fund for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.
            Sponsored by: Center for Austrian Studies, Center for German and European Studies, European Studies Consortium, the Human Rights Program, Institute for Global Studies, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Center for the Study of Media Ethics and Law, Human Rights Center at the Law School, Department of Sociology, Department of German Scandinavian & Dutch, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Center for Jewish Studies, Department of History.
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          • Special Screening "The Future's Past"

            Documentary by Austrian filmmaker Susan Brandstätter
            Wednesday, April 3
            7:00 p.m.
            Bell Museum of Natural History Auditorium

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            Director Susan Brandstätter will be present for a Q & A session after the film with Alejandro Baer, Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

            Using the Khmer Rouge Tribunal as a starting point, Susanne Brandstätter takes a deeper look into the lives of young people on the brink of adulthood. As the trial accusing a perpetrator of the Pol Pot regime progresses, it becomes a catalyst for a new generation of Cambodians questioning their parents, families and neighbors about the inhumanities their nation has suffered.

            Sponsored by Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and Center for Austrian Studies.

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          • P.h.D. Candidate in Spanish and Portuguese Erma Nezirevic to Present at CHGS Workshop

            "Mobile Memories: Collective Memory of Mass Violence in Spain and the (ex) Yugoslavia"
            Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies
            Friday, March 29, 12:00-1:30 p.m. Room 710 Social Sciences

            Spain and (ex)Yugoslavia have followed a seemingly parallel historical path in the twentieth century, including similar experiences of rising nationalisms, civil wars, dictatorships, transitions to democracy, and subsequent struggles over collective memory. Erma examines the interrelations between the collective memories of civil war and mass violence in both places (including new ex-Yugoslav states). Her goal is to explore how collective memory works between them and show how cultural production in one influences the other and vice versa. This exchange, along with their global and multigenerational influences, represents "mobile memories," for which a study of interdisciplinary sources is crucial.

            If you are interested in participating in the workshop please contact Shannon Golden at golde118@umn.edu.

            Remaining Workshop Schedule:

            April 11: Thursday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. (609 Social Sciences)
            Matthias Falter, " 'Antifascist Consensus' & the 'Club of Political Correctness': Addressing National Socialism in Austrian Parliamentary Debates on Right-wing Extremism"

            April 25: Thursday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)
            Hiromi Mizuno, "When Crimes Cannot Be Punished: the Comfort Women Issue and International Human Rights Law"

            May 3: Friday, 12:00-1:30 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)
            Courtney Gildersleeve

            May 9: Thursday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)
            Eric Harkleroad

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          • Now Accepting Nominations for 3rd Annual Inna Meiman Human Rights Award

            The Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
            are pleased to announce The 3rd Annual Inna Meiman Human Rights Award.

            Recognizing undergraduate students at the University of Minnesota who have made significant personal contributions in the promotion and protection of human rights.

            This award will be given in recognition of the friendship between Inna Meiman, a Soviet era Jewish refusnik who was repeatedly denied a visa to seek medical treatment, and Lisa Paul, a graduate of the University of Minnesota who fought tirelessly on her behalf, including a 25-day hunger strike that galvanized a movement for Inna's freedom. The friendship between Lisa Paul and Inna Meiman is memorialized in the book, Swimming in the Daylight: An American Student, a Soviet-Jewish Dissident, and the Gift of Hope.

            The award is intended to recognize a University of Minnesota student who embodies a commitment to human rights. The Awardee will receive a $1,000 scholarship.

            Nominations will be accepted through Friday, April 12, 2013 at 5:00 p.m.


            Nomination Information
            Eligibility:
            The awards are open to all full-time undergraduate students at the University of Minnesota.
            Criteria:
            The student has demonstrated a personal commitment to the promotion and protection of international human rights through significant work on a human rights cause during their time as an undergraduate.
            Through their efforts, the student has raised the visibility of a particular human rights issue among the University community or the broader public.
            The student has made a positive difference in the life of others, and has given voice to those who might otherwise not be heard.
            Nominations:
            Nominators should submit a letter of 750 words or less describing the human rights activities undertaken by the nominee during his or her time as a student at the University of Minnesota and a CV of the student being nominated.
            Students may be nominated by faculty, staff or other students at the University of Minnesota.
            Self nominations must be accompanied by a letter of recommendation from faculty, staff, and students who can attest to the achievements.
            Address and Deadline:
            Letters should be submitted by email to the Human Rights Program, hrp@umn.edu, or delivered to the Human Rights
            The nomination deadline is Friday, April 12, 2013 at 5:00 p.m.
            Ceremony:
            The Sullivan Ballou and Inna Meiman Award winners will be recognized publically at an event on May 3, 2013.
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          • CHGS and Department of American Indian Studies Announce Panel Discussion on Dakota Exile


            Nażicapi (Exile)
            The Dakota Exile: Impact and Resistance

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            "The Sioux Indians of Minnesota must be exterminated or driven forever beyond the borders of the state."

            Message of Governor Ramsey to the Legislature of Minnesota: September 9, 1862.

            Thursday, March 14, 2013
            7:00 p.m.
            275 Nicholson Hall
            Free and Open to the Public

            A Panel Discussion Featuring:
            Iyekiyapiwiƞ Darlene St. Clair: Moderator, introduction and context for the exile order.
            C̣aƞte Máza Neil McKay: Terminology and impacts of "benevolent" language. How Euro-Minnesotans benefited from the Dakota Exile.
            Ahdipiwiƞ Katherine Beane: Impacts of the Exile and the efforts to rescind the exile order.
            Ṡiṡokaduta Joe Bendickson: Dakota language revitalization.

            Introductions by:
            Alejandro Baer, Director, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
            Jean O'Brien, Chair, Department of American Indian studies



            In May of 1863 1,300 Dakota were loaded onto steamboats and sent to Crow Creek reservation. Crowded onto the boats and weakened by imprisonment, many died on the voyage. The new reservation was desolate and food was scarce. In the first six months at Crow Creek more than 200 Dakota people died, most of them children.
            The panel will focus on the exile order, the efforts to rescind the order and its impacts, as well as how Euro-Minnesotans benefited from the Dakota exile.
            Sponsored by: The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Department of American Indian Studies, Institute for Global Studies and the Human Rights Program.
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          • Human Rights Program assistant Whitney Taylor to present at CHGS workshop

            Perceptions of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY)
            Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies
            Thursday, March 14
            3:30-5:00 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences

            Whitney!.jpg

            International criminal tribunals are internally and externally contested spaces, and they necessarily operate in political environments. In the case of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), domestic groups have vocally challenged the legitimacy of the ICTY and its ability to do justice. Importantly, domestic public perception of the court appears to be divorced from the actual operations of the court.

            In this presentation, Taylor seeks to better explain the apparent disconnect between the relative successes of ICTY in terms of its intended outputs and domestic public perception of the court in the Balkans. Her focus is the interaction of actors within the Balkans--how they propagate different narratives about the work of the ICTY and how these contestations affect domestic public perception of the court. In particular, she investigates the role of political elites, civil society organizations, and the media.

            If you are interested in participating in the workshop please contact Shannon Golden at golde118@umn.edu.

            Remaining Workshop Schedule:

            March 29: Friday, 12:00-1:30 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)
            Erma Nezirevic, "Mobile Memories: Collective Memory of Mass Violence in Spain and the (ex) Yugoslavia"

            April 11: Thursday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. (609 Social Sciences)
            Matthias Falter, " 'Antifascist Consensus' & the 'Club of Political Correctness': Addressing National Socialism in Austrian Parliamentary Debates on Right-wing Extremism"

            April 26: Friday, 12:00-1:30 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)

            May 9: Thursday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. (710 Social Sciences)
            Eric Harkleroad



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          • Just Announced! Internationally Acclaimed Portrait Painter Felix de la Concha to speak on Campus

            Thursday, February 28
            11:30 a.m.
            Room 155 Nicholson Hall
            de la concha.png
            CHGS and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese are hosting the artist Felix de la Concha as he works on his recent project Portraits with Conversation. Felix paints a portrait while recording a session with the sitter; the process takes about 2 hours and has produced some very powerful portraits of various people throughout the world. Using this technique he has painted over 30 portraits of Holocaust Survivors.

            Felix de la Concha is coming to the Twin Cities to work with Holocaust survivors in our community to paint their portrait and record the sessions. The completed works will be donated to the University of Minnesota. Felix will discuss this project and other works when he speaks on campus.

            The lecture is free and open to the public.

            To learn more about Felix de la Concha visit his web page in the CHGS Virtual Museum by clicking here.

            Sponsored by: The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, European Studies Consortium and the Institute for Global Studies.

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          • PhD Candidate Department of French and Italian Corbin Treacy to Present at CHGS Workshop

            Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies
            Friday, March 1
            12:00-1:30 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences

            Aesthetics and Aftermath: Algeria 1962-2012

            Thumbnail image for Corbin.jpg

            Treacy's dissertation studies Algerian novels in French that respond to the political and social landscape of the post-independence period. Through their literary form, engagement with the political present, and utopian thinking, these works imagine counter-realities that interrupt the closed-circuit loop of violence and paralysis that have defined public life in Algeria in the aftermath of independence from France in 1962.

            Building on the recent work of critics who combine materialist dialectics and post-colonial critique, He will show how these texts disrupt this permanence of aftermath through particular aesthetic moves, suggesting new ways of reading post-colonial literature beyond the polarities of politics and poetics.

            If you are interested in participating in the workshop please contact Shannon Golden at golde118@umn.edu.

            Updated schedule: CHGS 2013 HGMV Workshop 2-1-2013.pdf


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          • PhD Candidate in sociology Shannon Golden to present at next CHGS workshop

            Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies

            Thursday, February 7
            3:30-5:00 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences


            Shannon Golden will present "International Law in Local Context: The ICC in Northern Uganda." as part of her dissertation research. Her dissertation explores the process of social reconstruction in post-war northern Uganda. On Thursday she will focus on the impact of the International Criminal Court in the lives of conflict survivors and their communities.

            If you are interested in participating in the workshop please contact Shannon Golden at golde118@umn.edu.

            Updated schedule: CHGS 2013 HGMV Workshop 2-1-2013.pdf

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          • January 27th: International Holocaust Remembrance Day

            Memory Since Day One
            by Alejandro Baer

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            On April 19th, 1945, only a few days after American troops had liberated the Buchenwald concentration camp, thousands of survivors gathered at its Appellplatz (the roll call square) and took the following oath: "We will not stop fighting until the last perpetrator is brought before the judges of the people! Our watchword is the destruction of Nazism from its roots. Building a new world of peace and freedom is our goal. This is our responsibility to our murdered comrades and their relatives."

            After the Buchenwald Oath was read aloud, the survivors raised their hands and said: "We swear". This was probably the first act of Holocaust memory ever performed.




            poster.jpegA month later, after the war in the European theatre came to an end, the Jewish Historical Commission stepped into action. Charged with preserving a record of the gruesome events, by way of research and documentation, the Commission produced and distributed posters encouraging the survivors in the DP (Displaced Persons) camps to bear witness and to write "the history of the last Churban". With the term Churban, the poster invoked the supreme paradigm of Jewish collective disaster: the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem.
            In the Buchenwald Oath, Nazi atrocities fueled a call for broad antifascist resistance. Many of the survivors were socialists, and they believed socialism to be the anti-fascist solution. In the poster addressing Jewish survivors, by contrast, the atrocities were primarily understood as an event in the history of the Jewish people. The Nazis here appeared as the latest in a long succession of murderous outsiders. As I. B. Singer said through a character in one of his books: "Every generation had its Pharaos, Hamans and Chmielnickis. Now it was Hitler".
            Jewish and socialist survivors of the Nazi camps were the forerunners of a complex memory culture that is now widely established. However, the Holocaust for long remained a collective memory primarily for the immediate victims. Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Day), on the 27th of the Jewish calendar month of Nissan (April/May) became a central day within the Jewish world.
            Only in the 1990s did European countries gradually introduce days of Holocaust remembrance. Some used anniversaries of local events such as the beginning of deportations, the evacuation of ghettos or the introduction of antisemitic legislation. These initiatives turned out to be only first steps toward the establishment, at the onset of the new century, of an international Holocaust Remembrance Day. The date is January 27, the day on which, in 1945, Soviet troops liberated the largest Nazi death camp, Auschwitz-Birkenau. January 27 was thus selected in order to provide a moment of collective annual remembrance across many different countries and to "reaffirm humanity's common aspiration for mutual understanding and justice" (Declaration of the Stockholm International Forum on the Holocaust).
            But, can memory be transferred? Can the Holocaust be meaningfully remembered outside the communities that were directly affected by it?
            The International Holocaust Remembrance Day is a supranational initiative that encourages states, institutions and individuals worldwide to collectively invoke this European and global symbol of absolute evil -with Auschwitz as its token- and to transform the term Never again into a universal imperative. As such, the Holocaust should render universal human rights, tolerance, and pluralism politically relevant to all who remember this event, particularly those -today a majority- who have no immediate relation to this past.
            This year, on the 27th of January, the Holocaust will be commemorated in 35 countries. There is no doubt that the Nazi crimes, epitomized by the term "Holocaust," are not one totalizing signifier containing the same meanings for everyone. As in Buchenwald and in the DP Camps in 1945, today there is not necessarily consensus on how exactly to commemorate the Holocaust.
            However, our duty to remember remains untouched. "It happened", wrote the Auschwitz survivor Primo Levi, "therefore it can happen again: this is the core of what we have to say. It can happen, and it can happen everywhere."
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          • Sociology Ph.D. Candidate Hollie Nyseth Brehm to Present at CHGS Workshop

            Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies
            Friday, January 25, 2013
            12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Sciences Building


            Hollie Nyseth Brehm will focus on two concurrent projects that she is pursuing, including her dissertation and a collaborative effort with Dr. Chris Uggen (Sociology). Both projects seek to better understand aspects of genocide. On Friday she will focus on the case of Rwanda and explore why certain regions in Rwanda saw more killings as well as why violence started comparatively earlier in some regions.

            Read Hollie Nyseth Brehm's article The Crime of Genocide as seen in the CHGS December newsletter, posted on the Society Pages by clicking here.

            If you are interested in participating in the workshop please contact Shannon Golden .

            Updated schedule: CHGS Workshop schedule 1-21-2013.pdf



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          • CHGS December Electronic Newlsetter Now Available On Line

            The Center for Holocaust and Genocides Studies electronic newsletter is now available to read on our website.

            We will post the newsletter after it has been sent to our subscribers. If you are interested in receiving the newsletter directly in your email box please subscribe by entering your name and email address in the box on the top right of our home page.

            To view this month's newsletter click here.
            For older newsletters click here.

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          • New Blog of Recent Library Acquisitions in Holocaust & Genocide Studies

            University of Minnesota Holocaust and Genocide Studies Librarian Susan Gangl has put together a new blog listing recent library acquisitions in the field of Holocaust and Genocide Studies. This is a comprehensive list, including call numbers and location the title is available for check out. You may access the site by clicking here.

            In addition to the blog, be sure to visit her Holocaust and Genocide library subject page by clicking here.

            For titles available in the Center's library please visit our Book & Video Library page.

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          • Visiting Professor Jaime Ginzburg to Present at CHGS Workshop

            Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies

            Friday, December 14
            12:00-1:30 p.m.
            Room 614 Social Sciences Building

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            "Authoritarianism, Violence and Melancholy"

            Professor Ginsberg's presentation is about language and violence. The first part, will focus on torture, considering how different social groups talk about it (considering examples from Brazil and Uruguay). There is a variety of perspectives, including the ways physicians describe it, and the point of view of victims. The Second part will feature a comparison between Hegel and Adorno,dedicated to representation. Aesthetics, Cultural Studies and Literary Theory have important contributions to studies on violence. Consideration will be given to those theroies and more specifically ideas from the Frankfurt School. The last part will be about death, loss and melancholy. It`s necessary to discuss images of death, in a way we can define how cultural production, in authoritarian regimes along the XXth Century, can speak against repression and violence.

            Professor Jaime Ginzburg is Associate Professor of Brazilian Literature at the University of São Paulo, in Brazil, and is currently a Visiting Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, where he is teaching a graduate seminar on Violence and Democracy. His latest books include, Crítica em tempos de violência. São Paulo: Edusp / Fapesp 2012; Escritas da violência, co-edited with Márcio Seligmann-Silva and Francisco Foot Hardman (Rio de Janeiro: Sette Letras, 2012), Vols. I and II; and Walter Benjamin: rastro, aura e história, co-edited with Sabrina Sedlmayer. Belo Horizonte: Editora UFMG, 2012.

            If you are interested in participating in the workshop please contact Shannon Golden golde118@umn.edu.

            Meeting Schedule 11-20-2012.pdf


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          • Alejandro Baer to Teach Mass Media & Society

            SOC 4090/ GLOS 4910: Mass Media & Society
            Mondays and Wednesdays
            11:15-12:30
            Spring 2013

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            This course provides a broad survey of sociological perspectives regarding the role of media (television, radio, printed press, film, and the Internet) in society. The course will examine historical media developments, theoretical frameworks used to analyze media audiences, producers, and effects, the impact of media in popular culture, their role in shaping social memories and the relation between media and violence, including terrorism and genocide.

            Professor Baer is the new director and Stephen C. Feinstein Chair of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. He is a distinguished scholar of Holocaust memory and testimony, and comes to Minnesota after serving on the sociology faculty of the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität-München in Germany.
            His books include Holocausto. Recuerdo y representación (Holocaust: Remembrance and Representation) and El testimonio audiovisual. Imagen y memoria del Holocausto (Audiovisual Testimony. Image and Memory of the Holocaust). In addition he has authored numerous articles addressing issues of genocide, memory, and Anti-Semitism. He is currently engaged in research focusing on the uses and abuses of Holocaust history and memory in the Spanish-speaking world as well as the trans-nationalization of memory.
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          • Rebuilding the Community: Jewish Life in Germany after the Shoah now available to view on YouTube

            On Sunday, October 28, 2012 Professor Jay H. Geller spoke to the community about Jewish life in Germany after the Shoah. A video of that talk is available by visiting The Center for Jewish Studies, University of Minnesota YouTube channel.

            Even after the Shoah, Jews chose to settle in Germany. Who were these Jews, and why did they decide to remain in a country that had been hostile to their very existence only a few years earlier? How did they deal with antagonism by German neighbors and isolation by Jewish groups abroad? This talk explores the circumstances that led to a renewed Jewish community in post-Holocaust Germany and the alliances that permitted it to flourish.

            Jay Geller is the Samuel Rosenthal Professor of Judaic Studies and Associate Professor of History at Case Western Reserve University. He specializes in Jewish history and modern European history, with a focus on Germany. He is the author of Jews in Post-Holocaust Germany, and co-editor of Three-Way Street: Germans, Jews, and the Transnational with Leslie Morris. He is currently writing a biography of Gershom Scholem and his family.


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          • Visiting Professor Matti Jutila to Present at CHGS Workshop

            Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies

            Thursday, November 29 from 3:30-5:00 p.m. Room 614 Social Sciences Building

            Presentation by Professor Matti Jutila, "Ideology of Racial Extermination? Representations of Marxist Ethnopolitics in The Soviet Story"

            Professor Jutila will be referring to the award-winning documentary, The Soviet Story by director Edvins Snore that tells the story of the Soviet regime and how the Soviet Union helped Nazi Germany instigate the Holocaust. Other subjects covered by the film include: - The Great Famine in Ukraine (1932/33) - The Katyn massacre (1940) - The SS-KGB partnership - French Communists and the Nazis - Soviet mass deportations - Medical experiments in the GULAG. The Soviet Story was filmed over 2 years in Russia, Ukraine, Latvia, Germany, France, UK and Belgium. The film includes recently uncovered archive documents as well as interviews with former Soviet Military intelligence officials.

            Dr. Jutila's main unifying theme of his research has been nationalism; how it affects contemporary world politics and the construction of political communities. His doctoral research investigated how transnational governance of the rights of national minorities has challenged nationalism externally by circumscribing the sovereignty of nation-states, and internally by challenging the idea of national homogeneity as the foundation of political communities.




            If you are interested in participating in the workshop please contact Shannon Golden golde118@umn.edu.
            Meeting and presentation schedule is now available by clicking on the link below.
            Meeting Schedule 11-20-2012.pdf
            The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS), the Human Rights Program and the Department of Sociology are organizing a Research Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Members of all departments in the Humanities and Social Sciences at University of Minnesota.
            The workshop was created to:
            Foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory.
            Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process.
            Engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
            Professor Alejandro Baer, director of CHGS, and Shannon Golden, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Sociology, are organizing the workshops.
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          • Remembering Kristallnacht: Combating Indifference

            Article by: ALEJANDRO BAER November 9, 2012 - Mpls. Star Tribune

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            November 9 and 10, 2012 marks the 74th anniversary of Nazi Germany's state instigated pogroms known as Kristallnacht (also known as "Night of broken glass"), a turning point in the anti-Jewish policy in Hitler's Germany. For most scholars it marks the beginning of the period we now define as the Holocaust.

            Read the entire article here.

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          • Alejandro Baer to speak about Kristallnacht in Civil War Spain

            Kristallnacht in Civil War Spain
            Tuesday, November 13
            Room 1210 Heller Hall
            4:00 p.m.

            "Germany introduces forceful measures against the Hebrews.
            A clear warning to international Jewry never again to make attempts on the lives of Germans."
            - Ideal, Granada, November 13, 1938.

            Professor Baer will talk about the contrasting treatment given to the news of the German anti-Jewish pogroms on November 9 & 10, 1938 by the Francoist and Republican sides during the Spanish Civil War.

            The Francoist press met the news with approval and glee, in contrast to the condemnations expressed in the Republican papers, which offered solidarity and support to the victims, even as the legitimate Spanish government approached it's own death agony.

            The Spanish republicans soon recognized that their fate was intertwined with that of European Jews.


            Professor Baer is the new director and Stephen C. Feinstein Chair of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. He is a distinguished scholar of Holocaust memory and testimony, and comes to Minnesota after serving on the sociology faculty of the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität-München in Germany.
            His books include Holocausto. Recuerdo y representación (Holocaust: Remembrance and Representation) and El testimonio audiovisual. Imagen y memoria del Holocausto (Audiovisual Testimony. Image and Memory of the Holocaust). In addition he has authored numerous articles addressing issues of genocide, memory, and Anti-Semitism. He is currently engaged in research focusing on the uses and abuses of Holocaust history and memory in the Spanish-speaking world as well as the trans-nationalization of memory.
            Sponsored by: Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies,Department of History, European Studies Consortium, Institute for Global Studies and the Department of Spanish & Portuguese.
            (Continue Reading)
          • Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies

            Meeting and presentation schedule is now available by clicking on the link below.
            Workshop Schedule Updated 10262012.pdf

            If you are interested in participating in the workshop please contact Shannon Golden golde118@umn.edu.

            The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS), the Human Rights Program and the Department of Sociology are organizing a Research Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Members of all departments in the Humanities and Social Sciences at University of Minnesota.

            Foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory.
            Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process.
            Engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
            Professor Alejandro Baer, director of CHGS, and Shannon Golden, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Sociology, are organizing the workshops.
            (Continue Reading)
          • Letter from the Director of CHGS

            I am pleased to announce that, with the beginning of the fall semester, I took up my new position as the Stephen Feinstein chair and Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and as a faculty member of the Department of Sociology at University of Minnesota.

            I am thrilled and honored to direct a center forged by the extraordinary vision of Stephen Feinstein, its founding director. I am committed to the mission of CHGS, advancing scholarship and collaboration across units of the University, and linking scholarship with public service and outreach to all sectors of society.

            Since I started my work here in Minnesota I have been meeting with colleagues across the University and partners in the community. My objective is to identify synergies in order to develop collaborative efforts that build on the rich heritage of successful events and initiatives over the past 15 years at CHGS.

            It is my intention to further develop CHGS as a major center of academic research, distinguished both by its international scope and local sensitivity. We will establish partnerships with institutions in the US and abroad, initially focusing on Europe and Latin America, to enhance the Center's national and international visibility and to attract graduate students and scholars. We will promote and undertake research and publication projects, develop attractive programs for lectures, conferences and workshops as well as innovative teaching initiatives. All these activities will be focused on raising awareness of Holocaust memory and advancing our understanding of the conditions and prevention of genocide within and beyond campus.

            This can be achieved with the help of the Center´s staff and advisory board, community-based partners and friends, and with the support and collaboration of colleagues throughout the College of Liberal Arts and the University. I very much look forward to working together with you to reach these goals.

            Please feel free to stop by my office to share thoughts and ideas. I look forward to meeting you.

            With best regards,

            Alejandro Baer


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          • Trinity University Professor asks, "Did Elie Wiesel Christianize the Holocaust?"

            Did Elie Wiesel Christianize the Holocaust?
            Wiesel's Night in Yiddish and French: Critical Appraisals and a New Approach

            A lecture by Professor Alan Astro, Trinity University, San Antonio, TX
            Friday, October 26
            Room 609 Social Sciences Building
            12:00p.m.

            Elie Wiesel's Night, which first appeared in French as La nuit in 1958, may well loom as the archetypal Holocaust survivor account. But it was only in 1994, in his memoirs, that the author addressed the fact that Night is part adaptation, part translation of a Yiddish work he originally published in Buenos Aires in 1956, entitled ...Un di velt hot geshvign (...And the World Was Silent).

            Critics have read discrepancies between the two versions in various ways: favorably, as resulting from appreciation for the distinct literary idiom of each language; provocatively, as the consequence of Wiesel's desire to cast the Holocaust in Christian, rather than Jewish, terms; and disparagingly, as part of a strategy to hide ideologically unpalatable, ethnocentric attitudes from a wider audience.

            This presentation will review merits and flaws of these differing interpretations of Wiesel's work, and sketch a possible new approach.

            Alan Astro (Ph.D., Yale University, 1985) is professor of Modern Languages and Literatures at Trinity University, San Antonio, Texas. He has published on Beckett, Borges and Sholem Aleichem as well as other modern authors in French, Spanish and Yiddish. Astro's latest work is Yiddish South of the Border: An Anthology of Latin American Yiddish Writing (2003).




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          • Scholar to speak on Jewish life in Germany after the Shoah

            Rebuilding the Community: Jewish Life in Germany after the Shoah
            Jay H. Geller, Professor of Judaic Studies, Case Western Reserve University
            Sunday, October 28, 2012
            7:30 p.m.
            Beth El Synagogue
            26th St., St. Louis Park, MN 55416

            Even after the Shoah, Jews chose to settle in Germany. Who were these Jews, and why did they decide to remain in a country that had been hostile to their very existence only a few years earlier? How did they deal with antagonism by German neighbors and isolation by Jewish groups abroad? This talk explores the circumstances that led to a renewed Jewish community in post-Holocaust Germany and the alliances that permitted it to flourish.

            Jay H. Geller is the Samuel Rosenthal Professor of Judaic Studies and Associate Professor of History at Case Western Reserve University. He specializes in Jewish history and modern European history, with a focus on Germany. He is the author of Jews in Post-Holocaust Germany, and co-editor of Three-Way Street: Germans, Jews, and the Transnational with Leslie Morris. He is currently writing a biography of Gershom Scholem and his family.
            This event is free and open to the public.
            For more information, please contact Center for Jewish Studies at jwst@umn.edu or by phone at 612-624-4914.
            Sponsored by: Center for Jewish Studies, Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch, Department of History and Beth El Synagogue.
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          • CHGS to offer Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty

            Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies
            Interdisciplinary Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty
            Tuesday, October 9, 2012
            Room 710, Social Sciences Building
            12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

            The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS), the Human Rights Program and the Department of Sociology are organizing a Research Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty Members of all departments in the Humanities and Social Sciences at University of Minnesota.


            The objectives of the workshop are to:

            1. Foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory.

            2. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process.

            3. Engage in dialogue with invited scholars.


            If you are interested in participating in the workshop but cannot attend the preliminary meeting, please contact the organizers to express your interest.
            The workshops are being organized by Professor Alejandro Baer, director of CHGS, and Shannon Golden, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Sociology.
            For more information on the workshop please contact Shannon Golden at golde118@umn.edu.
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          • CLA Names Alejandro Baer as New Feinstein Chair and Director of CHGS

            The College of Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota is pleased to announce that Professor Alejandro Baer has been named the Stephen Feinstein Chair and new director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

            Alex_Seminario_FCJE_IIIb.jpegProfessor Baer is a distinguished scholar of Holocaust memory and testimony, and comes to Minnesota after serving on the sociology faculty of the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität-München in Germany. His books include Holocausto. Recuerdo y representación (Holocaust: Remembrance and Representation) and El testimonio audiovisual. Imagen y memoria del Holocausto (Audiovisual Testimony. Image and Memory of the Holocaust). In addition he has authored numerous articles addressing issues of genocide, memory, and Anti-Semitism. He is currently engaged in research focusing on the uses and abuses of Holocaust history and memory in the Spanish-speaking world as well as the trans-nationalization of memory.

            Professor Baer has actively engaged the broader community in the issues addressed by his scholarship. He has directed the Spanish section of the Shoah Visual Archives project and has served as a member of the Spanish delegation to the International Task Force for Holocaust Education Remembrance and Research. With the support of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Spain, Professor Baer co-founded Radio Sefarad, designed to spread the ethical values, culture and science of Judaism through its history and current development to Spanish-speaking audiences. More recently he has curated a traveling exhibition, Visas for Freedom: Spanish Diplomats and the Holocaust, which he plans to bring to the Twin Cities.

            In addition to serving as Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Alejandro Baer will join the Department of Sociology as an associate professor.



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          • Evil Conspiracies and Common Enemies: Mussolini, the Vatican, and the Origins of the Italian Racial Laws

            Berdahl Memorial Lecture
            Dr. David Kertzer, Professor of Anthropology at Brown University
            September 24, 2012
            4:00 p.m.
            Cowles Auditorium, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs

            Dr. David Kertzer is Professor of Anthropology at Brown University, where he formerly served as Provost. Professor Kertzer's research ranges widely, including: Italian politics and history, anthropological demography, social organization, politics and symbols, political economy and family systems, age structuring, European historical demography and the history of Catholic Church-Jewish relations.

            For the past several years Dr. Kertzer has been working in newly opened Vatican archives, along with Italian state archives, on a book that probes the relationship between Pope Pius XI and Mussolini.
            Professor Kertzer has published several books and articles including, Prisoner of the Vatican: The Popes' Plot to Capture Italy from the New Italian State. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2004, was chosen as one of the best books of 2004 by Publishers' Weekly. His work, The Popes Against the Jews: The Vatican's Role in the Rise of Modern Anti-Semitism, 2001. New York: Knopf, was a selection of the Book of the Month Club.
            This event is free and open to the public.
            For more information please contact the Department of Anthropology at anth@umn.edu or by phone at 612-625-3400.
            Sponsored by: Department of Anthropology, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, Department of French & Italian, , Center for Jewish Studies, Department of History, Institute for Global Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Department of Religious Studies
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          • Judaken lecture now available on YouTube

            On April 25, 2012, Jonathan Judaken gave a lecture entitled, "The Conceptual Jew: Reflections on Arendt and Adorno's Post-Holocaust Theories of Anti-Semitism." The talk is now available to watch on CHGS' YouTube channel. Click here to view the video, as well as other CHGS-sponsored lectures, including Deborah Lipstadt and Alvin Rosenfeld.


            In this talk, Professor Judaken reconstructs the very different theoretical paradigms of the interactionist and the socio-psychoanalytic that Hannah Arendt and Theodor Adorno developed to understand anti-Semitism.
            Jonathan Judaken is the newly-appointed Spence L. Wilson Chair in Humanities at Rhodes College. He recently served as the Dunavant Professor of Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History at the University of Memphis. His research focuses on the patterns that underpin prejudice and the underlying assumptions that animate tolerance, values about the nation, race, gender, epistemology, and colonization.
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          • Rosenfeld lecture now available on CHGS YouTube channel

            In his public address on Sunday evening April 15, "Is There an Anti-Jewish Bias in Today's University?" Professor Alvin Rosenfeld discussed how many campuses have become hospitable to certain political and ideological currents of thought that issue in actions and statements that can be seen as hostile to many Jewish students and professors.

            Rosenfeld's appearance was in conjunction with the symposium, Betrayal of the Humanities: The University During the Third Reich. The symposium took place on April 15 and 16 in Mondale Hall. The symposium examined the moral role of the university in today's society while exploring the mutation of academic ideals under National Socialism, when the German university system promoted Nazi ideology and helped the state eliminate its diverse community. Fourteen scholars from across the U.S. and abroad, examined core academic disciplines, including anthropology, philosophy, classics, Assyriology, theology, law, and music. A publication of the proceedings is planned.
            You can view the talk by clicking here or visiting the CHGS YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/CHGSumn.
            More lectures on CHGS YouTube channel
            The CHGS YouTube channel is home to all of our recent lectures over the past year, including internationally acclaimed Holocaust scholar Deborah Lipstadt.
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          • Workshop: Trauma and Text: Approaches to Teaching the Literature of Atrocity

            July 23-July 27, 2012
            9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
            Room 614 Social Sciences
            University of Minnesota
            30 CEUs
            2 graduate credits available for additional fee (contact outreach@umn.edu if interested)
            Registration deadline: July 9, 2012


            How do we read narratives of trauma? What does it mean to experience the suffering of others through hart? What role can literature and film play in helping trauma survivors recover and heal? These are questions with which English, history, and art educators must grapple a twenty-first century populated with media images of tragedy and suffering. This institute will provide the opportunity for middle and high school teachers from across disciplines to think through the ways in which we approach the difficult task of engaging historical and personal trauma through creative works. We will examine closely both the positive uses of "trauma texts" and the risks that teaching such texts involves (secondary trauma, voyeurism, reductionism, pity). Importantly, we will spend time discussing the place of hope and agency, and the ways in which the artistic voice can promote growth and healing, both for the trauma survivor and the reader/spectator.
            We will read a variety of theoretical and primary texts across genres (short stories, poetry, film, theater). Guest speakers will provide the institute with outside expertise and perspectives from a diversity of contexts. Institute participants will develop and receive feedback on a micro unit constructed around a text (film, poem, play, novel, etc.) for use in their classroom and will participate in creative writing exercises that model ways in which students can use their own stories as potential sites for healing and growth.
            Register Online here.
            If you have any questions, please contact Deborah LeClaire at outreach@umn.edu or 612-624-7346.
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          • New translation of the testimony of Georges Wellers

            From Drancy to Auschwitz by the French Biologist and historian Georges Wellers was first published in France in 1946.

            Wellers worked for many years at the Sorbonne, where he held the position of Director of Research Laboratory of Medical Department. In 1941 he was arrested by the Nazis and spent more than three years in concentration camps-first in Drancy near Paris, then in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Despite all the deprivations during his captivity, Georges lived a long and productive life. He excelled in a prominent scientific career, was awarded the Legion of Honor Rosette as its Officer, was Vice-President of the Association of Nazi-camp survivors of France, and was the only French witness at the Eichmann war crime trial in Israel.


            The book has recently been translated into English and Russian by Wellers' niece, Olga Lifson, a Minnesota resident who escaped from the Soviet Union in the mid 70s. Ms. Lifson, along with her aunt and others who worked on the translation, dedicates the publication to all those who survived the Holocaust against great odds.
            To order a copy of the book please visit M-Graphics Publishing's website.
            Olga Lifson is available for speaking engagements and can be reached by email olifson3@gmail.com.
            A transcript of Georges Wellers' testimony from the Eichmann trial can be read here.
            To view the video of the testimony please click here.
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          • U.S. Court of Appeals rules in favor of the University of Minnesota in case involving the Turkish Coalition of America

            The United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit ruled in favor of the University today in a closely watched case involving First Amendment and academic freedom claims. A Plaintiff in the case, Turkish Coalition of America, claimed that statements on a University department website that suggested that the Turkish Coalition's information about the Armenian genocide was "unreliable" violated its free speech rights and were defamatory. A University student also allegedly feared he would be subjected to academic reprisals if he used information from the organization's website in his own work.

            The federal district court had previously granted the University's motion to dismiss the claims, based principally upon its finding that the University's website contained statements of faculty scholarly opinion and critique that were protected by the doctrine of academic freedom.

            The Court of Appeals today affirmed the District Court's dismissal of the plaintiff's claims. It found the Turkish Coalition free speech claim failed because it could not show it had suffered any restrictions on its speech activities. The Court of Appeals also found that the Turkish Coalition's defamation claims failed because the University faculty's statements were either true or were statements of opinion, which cannot support a defamation claim. The Court of Appeals also found the student had no standing to bring any claims because he could not show he suffered any injury.

            The case has been watched closely by scholars around the United States and the world because of its implications for principles of academic freedom. GC Mark Rotenberg stated, "Today's federal court decision confirms the right of universities and their faculty to offer scholarly criticism and critique on websites without fear of legal exposure. This protection is especially important when the scholarly opinions expressed by the faculty are controversial. We are very pleased to have successfully defended this important academic interest."


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          • The Conceptual Jew: Reflections on Arendt and Adorno's Post-Holocaust Theories of Anti-Semitism

            A Lecture by: Jonathan Judaken, Rhodes College
            Wednesday, April 25, 2012
            Room 710 Social Sciences Building
            4:00 p.m.

            Professor Judaken will reconstruct the very different theoretical paradigms of the interactionist and the socio-psychoanalytic that Hannah Arendt and Theodor Adorno developed to understand anti-Semitism.


            Despite their differences, Arendt and Adorno shared a common problem that riddled their respective understandings. Both depended upon elevating what he calls the conceptual Jew to the centerpiece of their paradigms.
            The conceptual Jew provided at once the critical energy for Arendt and Adorno's theoretical reflections on anti-Semitism, but also resulted in each of them reiterating stereotypical constructions of Jews and Judaism. In each case, these typologies of Jews prove quite similar.
            The hypothesized and essentialized conception of Jews that wends its way into their theorizing resulted in both cases in their insights as well as their blindnesses when it came to their respective analyses of what Adorno preferred to call "the anti-Semitic question."
            Jonathan Judaken is the newly appointed Spence L. Wilson Chair in Humanities at Rhodes College. He recently served as the Dunavant Professor of Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History at the University of Memphis. His research focuses on the patterns that underpin prejudice and the underlying assumptions that animate tolerance, values about the nation, race, gender, epistemology, and colonization.
            Sponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Center for Jewish Studies.
            Flier: Judaken.pdf
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          • The 2nd Annual Inna Meiman Human Rights Award Winners Announced

            Congratulations to Anna Kaminski recipient of the Inna Meiman Human Rights Award and Tenzin Pelkyi, who was awarded the Sullivan Ballou Award in a ceremony among family, friends and University faculty on Friday, April 20, 2012.

            Each award, carrying a $1,000 scholarship, recognizes a University of Minnesota undergraduate student who embodies a commitment to human rights and has worked tirelessly to address human rights abuses.

            Read article in Minnesota Daily by clicking here.

            The Inna Meiman Award is given in recognition of the friendship between Inna Meiman, a Soviet era Jewish refusenik who was repeatedly denied a visa to seek medical treatment, and Lisa Paul, a graduate of the University of Minnesota who fought tirelessly on her behalf, including a 25-day hunger strike that galvanized a movement for Inna's freedom. The friendship between Paul and Meiman is memorialized in the book, Swimming in the Daylight: An American Student, a Soviet-Jewish Dissident, and the Gift of Hope.
            The Sullivan Ballou Award is named after Major Sullivan Ballou, an Army soldier killed at the First Battle of Bull Run in 1861. Ballou became the inspiration for this award because of the heartfelt commitment he expressed in a letter to his wife before the battle. The award carries on Ballou's spirit by honoring a student who devotes heartfelt energy to those around them.
            The presentation included brief remarks by Lisa Paul, Elissa Peterson (founding member of the Sullivan Ballou Fund), and Professor Joachim Savelsberg (Advisory Board member of the Human Rights Program).
            Sponsored by: Human Rights Program, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
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          • "How Did You Get Here? Jewish Self Invention and the Culture of Exile"

            Alicia Borinsky
            April 19, 2012 12:00-1:30
            325 Nicholson Hall

            Alicia Borinsky will focus on the Diaspora and its tales of displacement and integration.

            Alicia Borinsky is a scholar, novelist poet who writes in English and in Spanish. She has won prestigious awards, such as the Latino Award for Fiction and a Guggenheim Fellowship, and is the author of several books and numerous articles published in Latin America, the United States and Europe. Her most recent book titles are: Frivolous Women and Other Sinners/Frívolas y pecadoras (Chicago: Swan Isle Press, 2010) and One -Way Tickets: Writers and the Culture of Exile (San Antonio: Trinity University Press, 2011). She has taught at Johns Hopkins, Brown, Washington University in St.Louis and Harvard. Currently she is Professor of Latin American and Comparative Literature and Director of the Cultural Studies Program in Buenos Aires at Boston University.
            This Event is Free & Open to the Public
            A light lunch will be provided
            Co-sponsored by: University of Minnesota Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies, Institute for Global Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, English Department, Department for Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
            For more information email: jwst@umn.edu, phone: 612-624-4914.
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          • This Sunday, April 15-"Is There an Anti-Jewish Bias in Today's University?"

            Alvin Rosenfeld, Irving M. Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies; Director, Institute for the Study of Contemporary Anti-Semitism (Indiana University)
            Sunday, April 15, 2012
            7:30p.m.
            Cowles Auditorium
            The Humphrey School of Public Affairs

            In his public address, "Is There an Anti-Jewish Bias in Today's University?" Professor Alvin Rosenfeld will discuss how many of our campuses have become hospitable to certain political and ideological currents of thought that issue in actions and statements hostile to many Jewish students and professors. A review of contemporary debates about two issues of particular concern to Jews--the Holocaust and the State of Israel--suggests that we may be witnessing the emergence of some new versions of the "Jewish Question."




            Alvin H. Rosenfeld's appearance is in conjunction with the Symposium, Betrayal of the Humanities: The University During the Third Reich. Sunday, April 15 and 16, at Mondale Hall.
            Professor Rosenfeld is the author of numerous scholarly and critical articles on American poetry, Jewish writers, and the literature of the Holocaust. His most recent study, The End of the Holocaust, contends that the proliferation of books, films, television programs, museums, and public commemorations related to the Holocaust has, perversely, brought about a diminution of its meaning and a denigration of its memory.
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          • CHGS to Host Symposium on the University During the Third Reich

            Betrayal of the Humanities: The University During the Third Reich
            Symposium
            Sunday April 15 & Monday April 16
            Mondale Hall, Law School

            Public Program: "Is There an Anti-Jewish Bias in Today's University?"
            Alvin Rosenfeld,Irving M. Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies; Director, Institute for the Study of Contemporary Anti-Semitism (Indiana University)

            Sunday, April 15, 2012
            7:30 p.m.
            Cowles Auditorium
            Humphrey School of Public Affairs



            1933FreiburgU.jpgUnder National Socialism in Germany (1933-1945), the universities and the academic disciplines themselves became in many cases all-too-eager accomplices in the perpetration of Nazi ideology. Not only did the normal administrative structure of the university become corrupted, but learning itself betrayed its own mission as prestigious disciplines propagated Nazi racial science and beliefs.
            In order to investigate the process whereby critical thought was replaced by blind obedience, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies will host a symposium to examine the moral role of the university in today's society. The symposium, co-organized by Bernard Levinson, Berman Family Chair in Jewish Studies and Hebrew Bible, and Bruno Chaouat, director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, will explore the mutation of academic ideals under National Socialism, when the German university system promoted Nazi ideology and helped the state eliminate its diverse community. Thirteen scholars from across the U.S. and abroad will examine core academic disciplines, including anthropology, philosophy, classics, Assyriology, theology, law, and music.
            In his public address, "Is There an Anti-Jewish Bias in Today's University?," Professor Alvin Rosenfeld will discuss how many of our campuses have become hospitable to certain political and ideological currents of thought that issue in actions and statements inimical to many Jewish students and professors. A review of contemporary debates about two issues of particular concern to Jews--the Holocaust and the State of Israel--suggests that we may be witnessing the emergence of some new versions of the "Jewish Question."
            The symposium and Alvin Rosenfeld talk are free and open to the public. For more information please contact chgs@umn.edu or 612-624-0265.
            For the complete symposium schedule, list of scholars and further information please visit the Betrayal of the Humanities website here.
            To RSVP for the Symposium please click here.
            Symposium flier: Symfin312.pdf
            Rosenfeld flier: Rosen312fin.pdf
            Sponsors: Imagine Fund Special Events Programs, Wexler Education Fund, Berman Family Chair in Jewish Studies & Hebrew Bible, International Travel Grant from the Global Programs & Strategy Alliance, Institute for Advanced Study, Center for Austrian Studies, Checkpoint Charlie Stiftung, Center for Jewish Studies, Center for German & European Studies, Department of History, Institute for International Legal & Security Studies, Department of Classical & Near Eastern Studies, Department of French & Italian, Department of Political Science, Religious Studies, Department of Art History, Department of Anthropology, Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch, Department of Philosophy, Legal History Workshop, Human Rights Center, Jonathan Paradise Hebrew Language Fund.
            Co-sponsors: Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Law School, Institute for Law and Rationality

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          • The Young Turks' Crime Against Humanity


            Taner Akçam
            The Tenth Annual Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Lecture

            Monday, April 16, 2012, 7:00p.m.
            Maroon & Gold Room, McNamara Alumni Center
            200 Oak Street SE, Minneapolis MN 55455

            This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the lecture.


            Professor Akçam will speak on his just-published book, The Young Turks' Crime Against Humanity: The Armenian Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing in the Ottoman Empire (Princeton University Press), which is based on research in over 600 Ottoman documents.
            Taner Akçam holds the Kaloosdian/Mugar Chair in Armenian Genocide Studies at Clark University's Strassler Family Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Akçam is the leading scholar in the world today on the history of the Armenian Genocide. He has published more than a dozen books, many of which have appeared in multiple languages, including Turkish, Greek, and German, as well as in English. Before taking his current position at Clark, Professor Akçam taught at the University of Minnesota and was associated with the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. He also taught at the University of Michigan - Dearborn.
            The Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Lecture results from a generous gift by Arsham Ohanessian to the College of Liberal Arts. Arsham was a successful businessman, avid musician, and dedicated community leader. He was devoted to promoting peaceful reconciliation among peoples. His gift to the University of Minnesota supports a wide range of educational, research, and public programs concerning human rights, ethnic and national conflicts, and Armenian history and culture.
            Sponsored by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair in the College of Liberal Arts, The Human Rights University and the Human Rights Program in the Institute for Global Studies.
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          • The 2nd Annual Inna Meiman Human Rights Award-Nominations Due Friday, April 6

            The Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
            are pleased to announce The 2nd Annual Inna Meiman Human Rights Award.

            Recognizing undergraduate students at the University of Minnesota who have made significant personal contributions in the promotion and protection of human rights.

            This award will be given in recognition of the friendship between Inna Meiman, a Soviet era Jewish refusnik who was repeatedly denied a visa to seek medical treatment, and Lisa Paul, a graduate of the University of Minnesota who fought tirelessly on her behalf, including a 25-day hunger strike that galvanized a movement for Inna's freedom. The friendship between Lisa Paul and Inna Meiman is memorialized in the book, Swimming in the Daylight: An American Student, a Soviet-Jewish Dissident, and the Gift of Hope.

            The award is intended to recognize a University of Minnesota student who embodies a commitment to human rights. The Awardee will receive a $1,000 scholarship.

            Nominations will be accepted through Friday, April 6, 2012 at 5:00 p.m.


            Inna Meiman Award Criteria
            Eligibility
            • The awards are open to all full-time undergraduate students at the University of Minnesota.
            Criteria
            • The student has demonstrated a personal commitment to the promotion and protection of international human rights through significant work on a human rights cause during their time as an undergraduate;
            • Through their efforts, the student has raised the visibility of a particular human rights issue among the University community or the broader public;
            • The student has made a positive difference in the life of others, and has given voice to those who might otherwise not be heard.
            Nominations
            • Nominators should submit a letter of 750 words or less describing the human rights activities undertaken by the nominee during his or her time as a student at the University of Minnesota and a CV of the student being nominated;
            • Students may be nominated by faculty, staff or other students at the University of Minnesota.
            • Self nominations must be accompanied by a letter of recommendation from faculty, staff, and students who can attest to the achievements.
            Address and Deadline
            • Letters should be submitted by email to the Human Rights Program, hrp@umn.edu, or delivered to the Human Rights Program, 214 Social Sciences Building, 267 - 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
            • The nomination deadline is Friday, April 6, 2012 at 5:00 p.m.
            Judging
            • The judging committee will consist of the staffs of the Human Rights Program, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and author, Lisa Paul.
            Ceremony
            • The Inna Meiman Award winner will be recognized publically at an event in April or May 2012.
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          • "Law and Democracy: The Paradoxes of Transitional Justice in Germany, 1945-1950."

            Devin Pendas, Associate Professor and director of graduate studies, Boston College

            Wednesday, April 4
            4:30p.m.
            Room 1210
            Heller Hall

            Wednesday, April 4
            4:30p.m.
            Room 1210
            Heller Hall
            The effort at transitional justice in Germany after World War II was one of the largest and most systematic ever undertaken. Among the least known aspects of that effort were the thousands of prosecutions for Nazi crimes undertaken by the Germans themselves in the immediate aftermath of the war.
            Shaped by the context of military occupation and the budding Cold War, these German trials had a complex and often surprising impact on the political culture of the two emerging German states. Prosecuting Nazi atrocities actually played an important role in consolidating East Germany's emerging Stalinist dictatorship. And it was West German hostility to prosecuting Nazi crimes that proved crucial to its eventual democratic success.
            Devin Pendas is Associate Professor and director of graduate studies at the Boston College Department of History. Professor Pendas also holds a position as a faculty affiliate and co-chair of the German Study Group at the Center for European Studies at Harvard University. His fields of interest include German history, modern Europe, legal history, and the history of mass violence and war.
            His research centers on war crimes trials after World War II, particularly on German Holocaust trials, and he is interested in the comparative and transnational dimensions of genocide. Pendas' 2005 book, The Frankfurt Auschwitz Trial, 1963-1965: Genocide, History and the Limits of the Law, provides a comprehensive history ofthe largest, most public, and most important trial of Holocaust perpetrators conducted in West German courts, addressing both the inadequacy of the trials and the public's divided response.
            He has received research fellowships from the German Academic Exchange Service, the MacArthur Foundation, the Center for Contemporary Historical Research in Potsdam, Germany, the U.S. Holocaust Museum, and the American Council of Learned Societies (Burkhardt Fellowship).
            Presented by: The Department of History, the Department of Sociology and the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies.
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          • ¡Si Hubo Genocidio!: Exhumations, Truth and Justice after the Guatemalan Genocide

            Victoria Sanford, Professor of Anthropology at Lehman College, City College of New York

            Monday, April 2
            4:00p.m.
            Room 250
            Blegen Hall


            When the Guatemalan Peace Accords were signed in 1996 ending more than three decades of internal armed conflict, more than 200,000 people were dead or disappeared, 626 mostly Maya villages had been massacred, 1.5 million people had been internally displaced, and 150,000 had sought refuge in Mexico. In this paper I explore local politics and meanings of exhumations of clandestine cemeteries in Guatemala within the context of transnational human rights practices and transitional justice paradigms. I trace the development of national, regional and international genocide cases against former Guatemalan generals over the past two decades. I analyze the role of forensic and cultural anthropology in the construction of historical memory. Community demands for reparation and societal demands for justice are considered within ongoing impunity in Guatemala which today has one of the highest homicide rates in the world.
            Victoria Sanford is Professor of Anthropology at Lehman College, City College of New York. Her research foci include genocide, feminicide, forensic anthropology, post-conflict violence, displacement, child soldiers, humanitarian aid, human rights, theories of violence and terror, and indigenous rights.
            She has published five books on violence and human rights in Guatemala and the field of anthropology, and her various articles have been published in Anthropology News, Radcliffe Quarterly, Propaganda Review, and Bulletin on Municipal Foreign Policy among others.
            She serves as a Research Associate at Columbia University's Center for International Conflict Resolution as well as an Affiliated Scholar at the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights, Rutgers University. As a human rights activist and scholar, her experience includes extensive research into indigenous communities in Latin America, including Guatemala, Colombia, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Mexico.
            Presented by: The Department of Anthropology, the Department of Sociology and the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies.
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          • Preventing Mass Violence: The Expansion of R2P and the Challenge of Statebuilding

            Jon Western, Associate Professor of International Relations at Mount Holyoke College

            Thursday, March 29
            3:30 p.m.
            1314 Social Sciences


            This talk will feature results from a research project that is situated in the literature on emerging norms and examines how and why the United States and the international community moved from failures to protect civilians from genocide and mass atrocities in Rwanda and Bosnia (prior to Srebrenica) to embark on ambitious liberal statebuilding efforts in Bosnia, Kosovo, East Timor, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and elsewhere. More broadly, the project examines how the doctrine of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) emerged in concept and expanded in scope to include a focus on capacity building and governance.
            Theoretically, it presents an analysis of the various pathways in which new norms emerge and are applied to policy decisions. It also explores how those norms are contested and can regress amid policy setbacks, domestic politics, and changing claims of legitimacy.
            Jon Western is Associate Professor of International Relations at Mount Holyoke College. His teaching and research focuses on U.S. foreign policy, military intervention, human rights and humanitarian affairs. His book, Selling Intervention and War: The Presidency, the Media, and the American Public, was published in 2005 by the Johns Hopkins University Press and his articles, book reviews, and essays have been published by journals including International Security, Harvard International Review, Global Dialogue, International Affairs, and Political Science Quarterly.
            Western has served as a peace scholar-in-residence and the coordinator of the Dayton Upgrade Project at the United States Institute of Peace. He has also taught at Columbia University and George Washington University and served as a Balkans and East European specialist at the U.S. Department of State.
            Presented by: The Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology, Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies.
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          • Global Memory of the Holocaust and the Politics of Never Again

            Alejandro Baer, Visiting Chair of Qualitative Methods of Social Research, Ludwig Maximilians-Universität-München

            Tuesday, March 27
            4:00 p.m.
            1114 Social Sciences


            Recent research on social or collective memory points to the universalization of Holocaust consciousness. According to this research the Holocaust is now also remembered beyond the ethnic boundaries of the Jewish communities or the nations that were responsible for perpetrating it, due in part to the shift in focus from national to cosmopolitan memory cultures. However, such theses pose many open questions in terms of the interpretation of the genocide of the Jews, its actualization as well as contextualization in the history of oppression and crimes against human rights in different countries.
            This lecture will present material from a study on Holocaust commemoration ceremonies in Spain, a country still facing the ghosts of its own past. The Spanish case study will lead to a more general reflection on the ongoing tension between particular and universal readings of past violence, the cross-fertilization of memory cultures and the important challenges faced by any individual or institution intending to implement prevention oriented Holocaust and genocide education.
            Alejandro Baer is on the sociology faculty of the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität-München, where he holds the position of Visiting Chair of Qualitative Methods of Social Research. His areas of research expertise include Social Memory Studies, Sociology of Culture and Religion, Sociology of Modern Judaism, Empirical Research on Anti-Semitism, Qualitative Research Methodologies, and Sociology of Media and Communication.
            His publications include, in addition to numerous articles and chapters in English and German, the books Holocausto. Recuerdo y Representación., Madrid: Editorial Losada, 2006, and El testimonio audiovisual. Imagen y memoria del Holocausto, Madrid: Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas (CIS), 2005.
            He directed the Spanish part of the Shoah Visual Archives project. His recent research includes the uses and abuses of Holocaust history and memory in the Spanish-speaking world as well as the transnationalization of memory. He organizes an annual international scholar's conference on Anti-Semitism, fostering international academic collaborations.
            Presented by: The Department of Sociology and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.
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          • No Generation of Silence: American Jews and the Holocaust in the Post-War Era

            Hasia Diner, New York University
            Jewish Studies Community Lecture Series
            March 21, 2012 7:30 p.m.
            Temple Israel
            2324 Emerson Ave S, Minneapolis

            American Jews in the two decades after the end of World War II found many ways to make the tragedy that had engulfed their people in Europe at the hands of the German Nazis a part of their communal culture. The Holocaust loomed large for them. How did postwar American Jews experiment with language and ideas to keep alive the memories of those who had perished in Europe-- and use their memories to effect changes in the world of the late 1940s through the early 1960s?

            Hasia Diner is Paul S. and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History at New York University and director of the Goldstein Goren Center for American Jewish History. Her many books include We Remember with Reverence and Love: American Jews and the Myth of Silence After the Holocaust, 1945-1962, winner of the 2010 National Jewish Book Award in American Jewish Studies. She was the recipient of a 2010 Guggenheim Fellowship.
            This Event is Free & Open to the Public
            For more information please contact the Center for Jewish Studies at e-mail: jwst@umn.edu, phone: 612-624-4914.
            This series is made possible by a generous gift in memory of Julia K. & Harold Segall.
            Sponsoring Partners: U of M Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, U of M Immigration History Research Center, U of M Depart. of History, Mount Zion Congregation, National Council of Jewish Women- St Paul Section, Jewish Historical Society of the Upper Midwest, and Temple Israel.
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          • The International Human Rights Movement: A History

            Aryeh Neier
            February 28, 2012, 7:00 PM
            McNamara Alumni Center
            Maroon & Gold Room
            200 Oak Street SE, Minneapolis (East Bank)

            Aryeh Neier has spent more than a half-century promoting and protecting the human rights of others. Born in Nazi Germany and a refugee at the age of two, Neier knew about violence from his earliest days. A tireless advocate for improvements in human rights globally, Neier has conducted investigations of human rights abuses in more than forty countries. He has played a leading role in the establishment of the international criminal courts that have heralded a new era of international justice.

            Neier is one of the architects of the international human rights movement. Neier served as National Director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) throughout the 1970's where he led efforts to protect the civil rights of prisoners and individuals in mental hospitals and fought for the abolition of the death penalty. Founder of Human Rights Watch, Neier was executive director during the first 12 years of that influential organization's existence. Later this year, Neier will be stepping down as President of the Open Society Foundations, an organization that has expanded the human rights movement through its funding partnerships across the globe.
            Join us as Neier reflects upon the accomplishments and challenges of the human rights movement of which he has played such an integral part.
            Neier's talk is the second in the Human Rights for the 21st Century: History, Practice & Politics Speaker Series and is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.
            For more information please contact Whitney Taylor, Human Rights University e-mail: hrminor@umn.edu, phone: 612-626-7947.
            Sponsored by the University of Minnesota's Human Rights University, the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair in the College of Liberal Arts, and the Humphrey School of Public Affairs
            Co-sponsored by the Human Rights Center, the Program in Human Rights and Health, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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          • The Post Holocaust Golem: A Jewish Legend Returns Now on CHGS YouTube Channel

            On Wednesday, November 9, 2011, Dr. Elizabeth Baer, Professor of English and Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Gustavus Adolphus College, spoke about how contemporary Jewish-American writers have created golem stories as a re-imagining of text-centered Jewish traditions by appropriating, adapting, revising and riffing on older golem legends. Such appropriation, deploying the imagination to seek a better understanding of human nature, is crucial in light of the Holocaust experience under the Nazis. The presentation included golems from novels, comic books, graphic narratives, and "The X-Files."

            Dr. Baer's new book, The Golem Redux: From Prague to Post-Holocaust Fiction from Wayne State University Press, will appear in Spring 2012.

            The lecture can be viewed on the Center's YouTube channel, CHGSumn.



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          • All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals

            David Scheffer
            February 8, 2012, 7 PM presentation, followed by a small reception
            McNamara Alumni Center, Maroon & Gold Room
            200 Oak Street SE, Minneapolis (East Bank)

            David Scheffer had an insider's seat at the creation of the most important human rights institution of our era, the International Criminal Court. Representing President Clinton as head of the U.S. delegation to negotiations establishing the Court, Scheffer drew on his previous experience spearheading efforts to create war crimes tribunals for the former Yugoslavia, the Balkans, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia.

            Scheffer has built a career working to stop war crimes. Listen with us as he shares the personal and political drama that unfolded during the international efforts to establish the Court and to make "never again" truly mean "never again". Scheffer is currently the Mayer Brown/Robert A. Helman Professor of Law and Director of the Center for International Human Rights at Northwestern University School of Law.
            Look for more information about two additional speaker series events coming this spring:
            February 28 - The International Human Rights Movement: A History, Aryeh Neier, President of Open Society Foundations, founder and former director of Human Rights Watch.
            April 3 - Moving Children: Human Rights Dilemmas in Contemporary Child Migration, Jacqueline Bhabha, director of Harvard's Center for Human Rights.
            Sponsored by the University of Minnesota's Human Rights University, the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair in the College of Liberal Arts, the Human Rights Program, and the Humphrey School of Public Affairs.
            Co-sponsored by the Program in Human Rights and Health, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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          • Bruno Chaouat to participate in Talmud Torah of St. Paul's evening of Jewish Learning

            Engage: An evening of Jewish Learning
            Is Holocaust Awareness Bad for the Jews?
            January 28, 2012
            8:35 p.m. - 9:35 p.m.
            Talmud Torah of St. Paul


            Is Holocaust Awareness Bad for the Jews? With a focus on contemporary France, Chaouat will test the hypothesis that the institutional focus on the Holocaust these last 30 years has triggered rivalry between descendants of several victimized groups and has, in certain circles, backfired against the Jews and the Jewish state.
            For more information see the brochure below or contact Beth Friend at Talmud Torah St. Paul 651-255-4735.
            EngageBrochure.v5.pdf
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          • CLA Announces Search for New CHGS Director

            Dear Friends and Supporters-

            I will be stepping down as director of CHGS at the end of this academic year, as planned when I accepted the two-year position in June 2010. I am delighted to announce that the College of Liberal Arts has decided to convene a search for a new permanent director.

            Being the director of CHGS has been a very rewarding experience for me. I would like to thank the staff of CHGS for all of their hard work in helping me further the mission of the Center. To our campus and community partners, thank you for all your warm support during my tenure.

            I am convinced that CHGS will benefit immensely from having a permanent director who can carry forth the vision of founding director Stephen Feinstein. In the meantime, CHGS will continue its work in educating all sectors of society about the Holocaust and other genocides; it is my hope that you will continue to support us and the work we do. Please consult our website for upcoming programming and the latest resources and news.

            I look forward to seeing you throughout the rest of the academic school year.

            Bruno Chaouat

            Posting: Director Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies




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          • Deborah Lipstadt Lecture now available on CHGS Youtube Channel

            Deborah Lipstadt, Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies at Emory University and author of internationally acclaimed books related to the Holocaust spoke on campus on Wednesday night, October 26 about Holocaust Denial: A New Form of Anti-Semitism and her recent critically acclaimed book The Eichmann Trial.

            You can view the lecture by clicking here.

            An audio interview with Dr. Lipstadt about Holocaust Denial and the 50th anniversary of the Eichmann Trial on Access Minnesota.


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          • Dispute between Watenpaugh and Turkish-American group

            As reported by Inside Higher Ed, Dr. Keith Watenpaugh, associate professor of religious studies at the University of California at Davis, has angered a Turkish-American group who reacted to an article about the historian's research that was published in the Davis alumni magazine by writing letters to university officials.

            Dr. Watenpaugh gave a lecture sponsored by CHGS in April 2011. To watch a video of his talk, click here.


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          • Special Film Screening- "As Seen Through These Eyes"

            Sunday, December 4, 2:00 pm
            Sabes Jewish Community Center

            Directed by Hilary Helstein and narrated by Maya Angelou, As Seen Through These Eyes is a window into the surviving art and artists of the Holocaust. The film offers an incredible look at humanity's survival mechanism, regardless of race or religion. The eyes of the witnesses reveal the profound need to communicate at any cost


            As Seen Through These Eyes features interviews with survivors who have given us something that history couldn't: a journal of the Holocaust as witnessed by those who through the very act of creating, risked their lives by doing what they were forbidden to do.
            Introductory remarks by Jodi Elowitz,CHGS. Following the film, please join us for a gallery tour of the companion exhibition Art Survives: Expressions From the Holocaust.
            Tickets: $10 ($8 Sabes JCC Premium and Community Members, Students)
            To reserve tickets, contact 952-381-3499 or email at tickets@sabesjcc.org.
            For more on Holocaust art visit CHGS Virtual Museum.
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          • "The Responsibility to Protect" The Hon. Lloyd Axworthy President of the University of Winnipeg

            Tuesday, November 22, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.
            Room 25, Law School, Mondale Hall, West Bank, University of Minnesota


            Dr. Axworthy, a former Canadian Minister of External Affairs and Ambassador to the UN, served twice as President of the UN Security Council. He is know for his advocacy of an International Criminal Court, as a Champion of the "Responsibility to Protect" principle, and for his work on the abolition of land mines, for which he was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.
            The rights of States traditionally trumped the rights of people. But in 2005 the United Nations General Assembly unanimously approved a fundamentally new concept of what sovereignty meant, declaring that it not only gave States certain rights, but also entailed the responsibility of States to protect their own citizens.
            Further, the new doctrine stipulated that when States failed to uphold this responsibility, the international community, acting through the UN, had not only a right, but an obligation, to act in the interest of endangered populations and could even use force to do so, though only as a last resort, when all other means of peaceful intervention had been exhausted.
            Laudable though the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine appears, it must be admitted that the international resolve to apply it has been wanting on multiple occasions. Why this is so and what can be done about the problem will be addressed by Dr. Axworthy during the course of his presentation.
            Sponsoring organizations: Minnesota Chapter, Citizens for Global Solutions; United Nations Association of Minnesota; Minnesota Alliance of Peacemakers, Advocates for Human Rights; Canadian Consulate General, Minneapolis; Advocates for Human Rights; World Without Genocide at William Mitchell College of Law; the Minnesota International Center; and the following units of the University of Minnesota: Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Human Rights Center of the Law School, Human Rights Program of the College of Liberal Arts, Department of Political Science, Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, and the Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change.
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          • The Post Holocaust Golem: A Jewish Legend Returns

            Dr. Elizabeth Baer
            Wednesday, November 9
            4:00p.m.
            Room 710
            Social Sciences Building


            The Jewish legend of the golem tells of a clay man brought to life to serve as a heroic figure in the Jewish community of 16th century Prague. His story has been recounted in many texts yet the golem has also gone through long periods of dormancy in his history, only to be brought back to life in key moments within the Jewish experience.
            Dr. Baer argues that contemporary Jewish-American writers have created golem stories as a re-imagining of text-centered Jewish traditions by appropriating, adapting, revising and riffing on older golem legends. Such appropriation, deploying the imagination to seek a better understanding of human nature, is crucial in light of the Holocaust experience under the Nazis. This presentation includes golems from novels, comic books, graphic narratives, and the X-Files.
            Dr. Elizabeth Baer, Professor of English and Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Gustavus Adolphus College. Her new book The Golem Redux: From Prague to Post-Holocaust Fiction from Wayne State University Press will appear in Spring 2012.
            Event flier: Ebaerfin.pdf
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          • Workshop Explores Childhood Memory as part of the Art Survives: Expressions from the Holocaust Exhibition

            Seeing The World Through Art: Creating a Symbol from Your Childhood Memory
            Workshop with David Feinberg
            Sunday, October 30, 1-4:00 p.m.
            Tychman Shapiro Gallery
            Sabes JCC


            Art is a way to investigate the world. During this workshop, create an artistic symbol from your childhood, using inspiration from the exhibit. Your symbol becomes your story and is expanded when shared and explored in a larger context. No artistic experience necessary, just an open mind!
            For more information visit the Sabes JCC website.
            Art Survives: Expressions from the Holocaust is on display through December 22, 2011.
            This extraordinary exhibit showcases the work of five Holocaust survivors who use art as a means to approach all they witnessed. These artists created work during and following the Holocaust, and some still create art today. The colorful artwork created on the walls of the barracks and shreds of paper using coal and pieces of colored pencils are a testament to the human spirit, enduring against insurmountable odds.
            Artist Biographies (PDF)
            In loving memory of Stephen Feinstein by Susan Feinstein
            For Artistic Responses to the Holocaust visit the CHGS Virtual Museum.
            Art Survives Expressions from the Holocaust by Jodi Elowitz. Article TCJewfolk.com
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          • Deborah Lipstadt Lecture Tonight at 7:00p.m. Coffman Theater

            The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS) proudly presents the Bernard and Fern Badzin Lecture featuring Deborah Lipstadt, Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies at Emory University and author of internationally acclaimed books related to the Holocaust.

            Wednesday, October 26, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. at the Coffman Theater, Coffman Memorial Union, on the East Bank of the University of Minnesota.

            Dr. Lipstadt will speak on Holocaust Denial: A New Form of Anti-Semitism and her recent critically acclaimed book The Eichmann Trial.

            The event is free and open to the public; however, reservations are required. To reserve your tickets please click here or call the reservation line at 612-626-2587.

            For parking and travel info please click here.

            The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education at St. Cloud State University is the initiating sponsor of Deborah Lipstadt's visit to Minnesota.

            University of Minnesota Sponsors: Institute for Global Studies, Center for the Study of Political Psychology, Program in Health and Human rights, Center for Jewish Studies, Human Rights Program, Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch, and the Institute for Advanced Study

            Community Sponsors: Jewish Community Relations Council, CHAIM Children of Holocaust Survivors Association in Minnesota, St. Paul JCC, and the Jewish Historical Society of the Upper Midwest


            Dr. Deborah E. Lipstadt is Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies at Emory University in Atlanta.
            deborah lipstadt photo.JPGDr. Lipstadt's new book, The Eichmann Trial, published by Schocken/Nextbook Series in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Eichmann trial, has been called by Publisher's Weekly, "a penetrating and authoritative dissection of a landmark case and its after effects." David Gergen of the Kennedy School has described it as "a powerfully written testimony to our ongoing fascination with the proceedings, the resonance of survivor tales, and how both changed our understanding of justice after atrocity."
            Her book History On Trial: My Day in Court With a Holocaust Denier (Ecco/HarperCollins, 2005) is the story of her libel trial in London against David Irving who sued her for calling him a Holocaust denier and right wing extremist. The book won the 2006 National Jewish Book Award and was first runner up for the Koret Award. Her book Denying the Holocaust: the Growing Assault on Truth and Memory (Free Press/Macmillan, 1993) is the first full length study of those who attempt to deny the Holocaust.
            At Emory she created the Institute for Jewish Studies and was its first director from 1998-2008. She directs the website known as Holocaust Denial on Trial (HDOT) which contains answers to frequent claims made by deniers.
            Lipstadt was a historical consultant to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and helped design the section of the Museum dedicated to the American Response to the Holocaust. She was appointed by President Clinton to the United States Holocaust Memorial Council on which she served two terms. She was a member of its Executive Committee of the Council and chaired the Educational Committee and Academic Committee of the Holocaust Museum. On July 7, 2011, President Barack Obama appointed Dr. Lipstadt to the Council again.
            She has taught at UCLA and Occidental College in Los Angeles. She received her B.A. from City College of New York (1969) and her M.A. (1972) and Ph.D. (1976) from Brandeis University. Professor Lipstadt is frequently called upon by the media to comment on a variety of matters.
            Tune in this weekend to Minnesota Access Radio for an interview with Deborah Lipstadt.
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          • Art Survives: Expressions from the Holocaust

            October 10-December 22, 2011
            Reception: Sunday, October 16, 7:00 p.m.
            Tychman Shapiro Gallery
            Sabes JCC



            This extraordinary exhibit showcases the work of five Holocaust survivors who use art as a means to approach all they witnessed. These artists created work during and following the Holocaust, and some still create art today. The colorful artwork created on the walls of the barracks and shreds of paper using coal and pieces of colored pencils are a testament to the human spirit, enduring against insurmountable odds.
            This exhibit offers a rare opportunity to view the art of Samuel Bak, Alfred Kantor, Dina Gottliebova Babbitt and Ela Weissberger on loan from the Gotthelf Art Gallery San Diego Center in La Jolla, California. Additionally, this exhibit includes work from local survivor Lucy Smith.
            Artist Biographies (PDF) art-survives-bios.pdf
            In loving memory of Stephen Feinstein by Susan Feinstein
            Related Events:
            Opening Reception: Sunday, October 16, 7:00 p.m.
            Remarks by Jodi Elowitz, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, U of M followed by a reception and gallery tour.
            Seeing The World Through Art: Creating a Symbol from Your Childhood Memory
            Workshop with David Feinberg
            Sunday, October 30, 1-4:00 p.m.
            Art is a way to investigate the world. During this workshop, create an artistic symbol from your childhood, using inspiration from the exhibit. Your symbol becomes your story and is expanded when shared and explored in a larger context. No artistic experience necessary, just an open mind!
            For more information visit the Sabes JCC website.
            For Artistic Responses to the Holocaust visit the CHGS Virtual Museum.
            Art Survives Expressions from the Holocaust. Article TCJewfolk.com
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          • Conference My Letter to the World: Narrating Human Rights Featuring a Lecture by Philip Gourevitch

            Monday, October 10, 2011
            Coffman Theater, Coffman Memorial Union

            Conference 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
            Esther Freier Lecture by Philip Gourevitch 7:30 p.m.



            "My Letter to the World: Narrating Human Rights" will be held on Monday, October 10, 2011, at the University of Minnesota to bring together a diverse group of writers, scholars, journalists, field workers, psychologists and others concerned with telling the stories of human rights abuses, genocide and atrocity across a historical and contemporary range of cultures and circumstances. In broad terms, the conference links literary work (specifically, memoir and the first person voice) with human rights testimony, scholarship and field work.
            Co-hosted by the Human Rights Program, and the Creative Writing Program of the University of Minnesota.
            "Salvage: Writing About Aftermaths from Rwanda to Abu Ghraib and Beyond"
            Philip Gourevitch's harrowing nonfiction account of the 1994 Rwandan genocide, We Wish to Inform You that Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families, won the 1998 National Book Critics' Circle Award. The long-time staff writer for The New Yorker has also published The Ballad of Abu Ghraib (2008) and A Cold Case (2001). Gourevitch edited The Paris Review from 2005 to 2010.
            Free & open to the public. Sponsored by the Esther Freier Endowed Lectures in Literature and the one-day conference "My Letter to the World: Narrating Human Rights."
            Sponsored by the Human rights Program and the Department of English
            Co-sponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

            For more information and the complete schedule please click here.
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          • Help CHGS Rebuild Our Website

            The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies is in the process of rebuilding our website. Please take a few minutes to complete this short survey. We value your input, and appreciate your support.




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          • Presidential Study Directive on Mass Atrocities

            On August 4, President Obama announced two important steps to prevent mass atrocities: the creation of a standing inter-agency Atrocities Prevention Board and a proclamation barring serious human rights violators from entering the United States.

            PRESIDENTIAL STUDY DIRECTIVE/PSD-10

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          • Voices From Congo: The Road Ahead

            Live webcast on Tuesday, July 26 starting at 9:30 a.m. EST on the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum website.

            The stakes for the Democratic Republic of the Congo in the coming months are very high, not only for the country but also for the region. Preparations for elections scheduled for November are inadequate, political intimidation and violence are increasing, and human rights violations continue.
            We invite you to join us for a unique conference that will bring to Washington a Congolese perspective on the current political and human rights situation and help inform U.S. policy on Congo with constructive ideas and recommendations.
            This event is cosponsored by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the National Endowment for Democracy, and the Eastern Congo Initiative. It is made possible in part by the Helena Rubinstein Fund.
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          • Enemies of the People Available for Download on iTunes

            The award-winning documentary about the brutalities of the Khmer Rouge Killing Fields is now available for download on iTunes.

            The Khmer Rouge slaughtered nearly two million people in the late 1970s. Yet the Killing Fields of Cambodia remain largely unexplained. Until now. Enter Thet Sambath, an unassuming, yet cunning, investigative journalist who lost his family in the conflict and spends a decade gaining the trust of the men and women who perpetrated the massacres. From the foot soldiers who slit throats to Pol Pot's right-hand man, the notorious Brother Number Two, Sambath and co-director Rob Lemkin record shocking testimony never before seen or heard.
            You can also watch an interview with filmmaker Rob Lemkin on PBS's series Behind the Lens.
            Educators, click here for a film discussion guide to use in the classroom.
            CHGS has more information about the Cambodian genocide available here.
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          • Summer Institute on Human Rights

            Institute on Human Rights Education and Advocacy
            July 18 - July 22, 2011
            9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
            Twin Cities,West Bank
            Cost: $75

            The Human Rights Program of the University of Minnesota is holding the institute to introduce participants to the theory and practice of international human rights in the world today.


            This institute is available to K-12 educators, community college faculty, educational administrators, and individuals seeking training in human rights advocacy. Advance registration is required.
            This institute is designed to introduce participants to the theory and practice of international human rights in the world today. The course will first provide an overview of the international laws that define human rights and the mechanisms designed to enforce human rights, and will analyze some contemporary issues in human rights. During the second part of the institute, participants will engage directly in applying human rights concepts and strategies to their work as advocates or as educators. These advocacy sessions will use tactical mapping to visualize the systemic causes of human rights violations and then design strategic approaches to prevent violations.
            Additional instructors include Professor Karina Ansolabere, Academic Secretary of the Faculty of Social Sciences in Mexico, and Nancy Pearson, Program Director of New Tactics, a project of the Center for Victims of Torture.
            All programs will be held on the West Bank of the University of Minnesota. Information regarding the location, parking, and materials will be mailed to registered participants two weeks prior to the start of the institute.
            Teachers from outside the Minneapolis-St Paul metro area are eligible to stay in on-campus housing. Each institute has a limited number of housing scholarship available to teachers on a first-come, first-served basis. Contact Molly McCoy at mccoy019@umn.edu for application.
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          • "Thoughts on Agamben's Remnants of Auschwitz: A Talk at the University of Minnesota." Now available


            "Thoughts on Agamben's Remnants of Auschwitz: A Talk at the University of Minnesota." by Jeffrey Mehlman

            Thumbnail image for REMAusch.jpgOn April 13, Jeffrey Mehlman presented "Thoughts on Agamben's Remnants of Auschwitz: A Talk at the University of Minnesota." Prof. Mehlman's appearance was sponsored by University's Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies as part of its "Alternative Narratives or Denial?" lectures.
            You can read the paper by clicking on the link below.
            Mehlman on Agamben 413011.pdf
            Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive by Giorgio Agamben.
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          • Régine Waintrater's "Testimony: Genocide and Transmission" available to view online

            Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Régine Waintrater.pngOn March 28, 2011 Régine Waintrater presented a paper entitled "Testimony: Genocide and Transmission" at the University of Minnesota. Prof. Waintrater's appearance was sponsored by University's Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.
            CHGS is pleased to announce its new YouTube Channel, CHGSumn, where you can view her lecture. A print version in of the talk is availableTestimony Genocide and Transmission.pdf.
            Régine Waintrater is a psychoanalyst, family therapist, and an associate professor at the Université Paris 7-Diderot. Her practice as a therapist is critical of the ideology of testimony as catharsis. Waintrater has been involved in the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale University Library, and in the USC Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, two important projects of testimony collection. She is the author of Sortir du genocide (Out of Genocide: Testifying to Learn to Live Again).
            Further Reading (including some of the sources cited in the lecture):
            Améry, Jean. At the Mind's Limits: Contemplations by a Survivor on Auschwitz and Its Realities.
            Delbo, Charlotte. Days and Memory.
            Hatzfeld, Jean. Into the Quick of Life.
            Langer, Lawrence. Holocaust Testimonies: The Ruins of Memory.
            Levi, Primo. The Drowned and the Saved.
            Levi, Primo. Survival in Auschwitz.
            Ricoeur, Paul. Oneself as Another.
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          • Video of Professor Keith David Watenpaugh's lecture Hate in the Past Tense available online

            Thumbnail image for watenpaughtie.jpgOn April 14, 2011 Dr. Keith David Watenpaugh presented his paper Hate in the Past Tense: Understanding the Origins of Armenian Genocide Denial as a Problem of Contemporary Reconciliation at the University of Minnesota as a guest of the CHGS.
            In his talk Dr. Watenpaugh explored how aspects of Armenian Genocide denial first emerged around a discrete historical moment, in particular international humanitarian relief efforts on behalf of Armenian Genocide survivors in the early interwar period. Thinking about denial in this fashion creates a space in which to reflect critically about how history as both a discipline and practice operates in the spheres of power and public opinion, especially across political and cultural divides.
            CHGS is pleased to announce its new YouTube Channel CHGSumn where you can view Dr. Watenpaugh's lecture by clicking here.
            Keith David Watenpaugh is a historian and associate professor of modern Islam, human rights and peace at UC Davis. Watenpaugh is the author of one of the definitive studies on the Arab middle class and revolution, "Being Modern in the Middle East: Revolution, Nationalism and the Arab Middle Class." He has lived in Egypt, Syria, and Turkey and worked in Iraq. Recently he was the Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow in International Peace at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C. He serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Middle East Studies and is at work on a study on the history of human rights and humanitarianism in the Middle East.
            For more resources visit the CHGS Armenian Genocide page.
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          • The transcript of Meïr Waintrater's lecture "You, Zionist!" Uses and Misuses of the Z-Word in Current Political Discourse is now available.


            antisemitism2.jpg On March 29, 2011 Meïr Waintrater, editor-in-chief, L'Arche spoke at the St. Paul JCC about the systematic use of the words "Zionism" and "Zionist" where the words "Israel" and "Israelis" would be expected by various individuals who are hostile to Israel. Waintrater contrasted the use of the word "Zionist" in France, Great Britain and the United States, suggesting that while criticism of Israel should not be reduced to Jew-hatred, the "anti-Zionist" argument is often used to legitimize genuine anti-Semitism.

            To read the transcript of that lecture please click on the PDF file below.

            Uses and Misuses of the ZWord in Current Political Discourse.pdf

            Meïr Waintrater was born in 1947 in Paris, and lived and worked as an economist and journalist at various institutions in Israel between 1973 and 1988. As editor-in-chief of L'Arche, he is a major commentator on questions of Jewish importance in Europe and France.

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          • Alternative Narratives or Denial?

            Godard's Wars
            Philip Watts, Associate Professor of French, Department Chair, Columbia University

            Thoughts on Giorgio Agamben's Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive
            Jeffrey Mehlman, Professor of French, Department of Romance Studies, College of Arts and Sciences, Boston University

            Wednesday, April 13
            4:00 p.m.
            Humphrey Forum, Humphrey Center

            Godard's Wars

            jean-luc-godard.jpg There has been much controversy about French filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard's relation to the Jews and the Holocaust. Godard was recently accused of anti-Semitism. Philip Watts will return to this recent affair by focusing on Godard's filmic representation of WWII, the Middle East conflict and the Holocaust.
            How has the Holocaust figured in Godard's films since his earliest days as a filmmaker of the New Wave? What role has the memory of the Holocaust played in Godard's radical politics? What is the relation between the representation of the Holocaust in his films and his anti-Zionism? Do Godard's films somehow distort the memory of the Holocaust? Watts will tackle these questions by revisiting three Godard's films: "A Married Woman" (1964), "Ici et ailleurs" (1975) and "In Praise of Love "(2001) to examine Godard's problematic construction of the memory of the Second World War and of the Holocaust in particular.

            Philip Watts, Associate Professor of French, Department Chair, Columbia University, received his BA at the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1982 and his PhD from Columbia University in 1991. His research and teaching focuses on 20th-century French literature and film and the relation between politics and aesthetics.


            Thoughts on Giorgio Agamben's Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive
            Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben has argued in several books that the concentration camp has become the paradigm of our life in modern, liberal democracies. His work has a vast influence on many different fields and disciplines: legal scholarship, social sciences (especially political science), and literary studies in the US, Europe and beyond.
            Thumbnail image for REMAusch.jpg
            Jeffrey Mehlman will examine the perils engaged and not always avoided when Italy's pre-eminent philosopher, perched between Heidegger and Benjamin, Foucault and Arendt, hurls the pre-eminent discourses of European modernity at the pre-eminent catastrophe of the twentieth century in what never quite coheres as the pre-eminent epistemological encounter of modern times.
            Jeffrey Mehlman, Professor of French, Department of Romance Studies, College of Arts and Sciences, Boston University is a literary critic and a historian of ideas. Over a number of years, he has been writing an implicit history of speculative interpretation in France in the form of a series of readings of canonical literary works.
            Thoughts on Giorgio Agamben's Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive(Scribd.com)
            Co-sponsored by: Department of History, Human Rights Program, Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch, Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature, and the Department of French and Italian.
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          • "Hate in the Past Tense: Understanding the Origins of Armenian Genocide Denial as a Problem of Contemporary Reconciliation"

            Keith David Watenpaugh
            Thursday, April 14
            4:00 p.m.
            Room 710 Social Science Building

            watenpaughtie.jpg Dr. Watenpaugh will explore how aspects of Armenian Genocide denial first emerged around a discrete historical moment, in particular international humanitarian relief efforts on behalf of Armenian Genocide survivors in the early interwar period. Thinking about denial in this fashion creates a space in which to reflect critically about how history as both a discipline and practice operates in the spheres of power and public opinion, especially across political and cultural divides.



            Understanding genocide denial in the early interwar period is more than just a step in correcting or confronting a mistake in the historical record, but rather constitutes a form of social history where the very crisis that caused denial brings into relief, to borrow a phrase from Michel Foucault, competing "regimes of truth" that are both a product of and central referent of ideological and religious doxa.
            The added benefit of understanding Armenian Genocide denial at its earlier moments of articulation, especially where it intersects with the emerging humanitarian régime of the interwar period as a novel, though not unprecedented, style of historicism, is recognizing it as a manifestation of an ideology and a manufactured and reactive defense. This is not to say that the narratives of denial and narratives of acknowledgement are, due to their shared metahistorical implications equal in truth (or lack thereof) rather, each becomes more readily explained as a complex and understandable response to identifiable counter narratives and their underlying ideology.
            In the end, seeing denial as less a reflection of a kind of unyielding and unchanging essential societal psychosis than a concerted act that has a contextual and historically bound basis suggest as well a possible path to reconciliation.
            Professor Watenpaugh will also present "Hate in the Past Tense" in an abbreviated format at 7:00 p.m. at the St. Sahag Armenian Church 203 North Howell Street, St. Paul.
            Co-Sponsored by: European Studies Consortium, Department of History, Human Rights Program, Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch, Cultural Studies & Comparitive Literature, and the Department of French and Italian.
            Related Programs
            CHGS Reading Discussion Group
            "Remembrance and Denial: The Case of the Armenian Genocide"

            by Richard G. Hovannisian
            Facilitated by Keith David Watenpaugh
            Thursday, April 14
            12:00 p.m.
            Room 201A, Wilson Library
            Reservations are required and can be made via email at CHGS@umn.edu Please put RDG in the subject line and include your name, phone and email address in the body of the message, or phone at 612-624-0256.
            Chapters available on line by visiting the CHGS Reading Discussion Group Blog.
            "Finding the Lost: The League of Nations' Rescue of Armenian Genocide Survivors and the Paradoxes of Modern Humanitarianism"
            Keith David Watenpaugh
            Friday, April 15
            3:30p.m.
            Room 1210 Heller Hall
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          • "You, Zionist!" Uses and Misuses of the Z-Word in Current Political Discourse

            Thumbnail image for antisemitism2.jpgMeïr Waintrater, Editor-in-Chief, L'Arche
            Tuesday, March 29, 2011
            7:00 p.m.
            St. Paul JCC
            1375 St. Paul Avenue
            Saint Paul, MN 55116

            For several years, within circles hostile to Israel, there has been a systematic use of the words "Zionism" and "Zionist" where the words "Israel" and "Israelis" would be expected. Meïr Waintrater, French journalist and editor-in-chief of the Jewish magazine L'Arche, will contrast the use of the word "Zionist" in France, Great Britain and the United States. Waintrater will suggest that while criticism of Israel should not be reduced to Jew-hatred, the "anti-Zionist" argument is often used to legitimize genuine anti-Semitism.

            Meïr Waintrater was born in 1947 in Paris, and lived and worked as an economist and journalist at various institutions in Israel between 1973 and 1988. As editor-in-chief of L'Arche, he is a major commentator on questions of Jewish importance in Europe and France. France is home to one of the largest Jewish communities, while at the same time being home to one of the largest Muslim populations in Western Europe. Waintrater's perspective is crucial to understanding the tensions between the two communities, as well as the recent increase in French Jewish immigration to Israel which can be seen as a consequence of a new trend in anti-Semitism.

            Co-sponsors: Jewish Community Relations Council (JCRC), St. Paul JCC,
            University of Minnesota: Center for Jewish Studies, School of Journalism and Mass Communication.


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          • Testimony: Genocide and Transmission

            Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Régine Waintrater.png
            Régine Waintrater
            Psychoanalyst, Family Therapist, Associate Professor at Université Paris 7-Diderot
            Monday, March 28, 2010
            5:00p.m.
            Humphrey Forum, Humphrey Center
            301 19th Ave. S.


            The human catastrophes that marked the 20th century have made survivor testimony an unprecedented issue. For genocide survivors and their descendants, testimony is a means to inscribe a history within a genealogy that has been broken by the violent acts of genocide. As an oral or written account, testimony engages, provokes and challenges disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences. How does the process of witnessing develop? What are the expectations that it provokes--and what are its risks? How can bearing witness restore the victims' identity, rather than re-traumatizing them?

            Régine Waintrater's practice as a therapist is critical of the ideology of testimony as catharsis. Waintrater has been involved in the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale University Library, and in the USC Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, two important projects of testimony collection. Her experience with these projects will be the point of departure for addressing issues surrounding testimony.

            Régine Waintrater is the author of Sortir du genocide (Out of Genocide: Testifying to Learn to Live Again).

            Co-sponsors: The Human Rights Center at the University of Minnesota Law School, History Department, Human Rights Program, CHAIM (Children of Holocaust Survivors Association in Minnesota)

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          • Calling for Nominations for Inna Meiman Human Rights Award!

            The Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
            are pleased to announce

            The Inna Meiman Human Rights Award
            Recognizing students at the University of Minnesota who have made significant personal contributions in the promotion and protection of human rights

            Thumbnail image for bookcover.jpgThis award will be given in recognition of the friendship between Inna Meiman, a Soviet era Jewish refusnik who was repeatedly denied a visa to seek medical treatment, and Lisa Paul, a graduate of the University of Minnesota who fought tirelessly on her behalf, including a 25-day hunger strike that galvanized a movement for Inna's freedom. The friendship between Lisa Paul and Inna Meiman is memorialized in the book, Swimming in the Daylight: An American Student, a Soviet-Jewish Dissident, and the Gift of Hope.The award is intended to recognize a University of Minnesota student who embodies a commitment to human rights. The Awardee will receive a $1000 scholarship.

            Nominations will be accepted through Friday, March 4, 2011 at 5:00 p.m.


            Inna Meiman Award Criteria
            Eligibility
            The awards are open to all full-time undergraduate students at the University of Minnesota.
            Criteria
            The student has demonstrated a personal commitment to the promotion and protection of international human rights through significant work on a human rights cause during their time as an undergraduate;
            Through their efforts, the student has raised the visibility of a particular human rights issue among the University community or the broader public;
            The student has made a positive difference in the life of others, and has given voice to those who might otherwise not be heard.
            Nominations
            Nominators should submit a letter of 500 words or less describing the human rights activities undertaken by the nominee during his or her time as a student at the University of Minnesota.
            Students may be nominated by faculty, staff or other students at the University of Minnesota.
            Self nominations must be accompanied by a letter of recommendation from faculty, staff, and students who can attest to the achievements.
            Address and Deadline
            Letters should be submitted by email to the Human Rights Program, hrp@umn.edu, or delivered to the Human Rights Program, 214 Social Sciences Building, 267 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
            The nomination deadline is Friday, March 4 at 5:00 p.m.
            Judging
            The judging committee will consist of the staffs of the Human Rights Program, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and author, Lisa Paul.
            Ceremony
            The Inna Meiman Award winner will be recognized at an event featuring Lisa Paul, on Friday, March 10, 2011 from noon till 2:00 p.m. in 609 Social Sciences Building. The Award winner will be notified ahead of time.
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          • A Film Unfinished

            Thumbnail image for AFU_Poster.jpegThursday, March 3, 2011
            7:00pm
            St. Anthony Main Theater 115 Main St SE
            Minneapolis
            Tickets:
            $6.00 student/senior
            $8.50 general admission

            Post-show discussion moderated by Bruno Chaouat, Director CHGS

            In 1942, the Nazi propaganda machine was hard at work. 70 years later, the deceit is finally unmasked.

            At the end of WWII, 60 minutes of raw film, having sat undisturbed in an East German archive, was discovered. Shot by the Nazis in Warsaw in May 1942, and labeled simply "Ghetto," this footage quickly became a resource for historians seeking an authentic record of the Warsaw Ghetto. However, the later discovery of a long-missing reel, inclusive of multiple takes and cameraman staging scenes, complicated earlier readings of the footage.

            "A Fim Unfinished" is one of the most uncanny documentary movies about Nazi nihilism, said Bruno Chaouat, director for the center. "It confronts the viewer with the abyss of cynicism into which totalitarianism had immersed Europe. One of the most critical reflection on the visual archive, "A Film Unfinished" is as close as it gets to visual thought."

            A Film Unfinished, presents the raw footage in its entirety, carefully noting fictionalized sequences (including a staged dinner party) falsely showing "the good life" enjoyed by Jewish urbanites, and probes deep into the making of a now-infamous Nazi propaganda film.

            Sponsored by: The Film Society of Minneapolis/St. Paul and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies





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          • CHGS "Alternative Narratives or Denial?" Reading Discussion Group

            In conjunction with the spring lecture "Alternative Narratives or Denial," taking place on campus April 13 and 14, CHGS will facilitate a reading discussion group focusing on seminal works on the topic of Holocaust and genocide denial.

            On February 15th, 2011, we will discuss Empathy to Denial: Arab Responses to the Holocaust by Esther Webman and Meir Litvak.

            Feel free to join us even if you were unable to attend the first meeting of the group.

            Reservations required: Please email chgs@umn.edu or phone 612-624-0256.

            For more on the discussion visit the CHGS Reading Discussion Group blog.


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          • NUREMBERG: Its Lesson for Today

            Saturday, February 5
            7:00 p.m. at the Lagoon Cinema
            1320 Lagoon Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55408

            Thumbnail image for Nuremberg.jpg

            NUREMBERG: Its Lesson for Today (The Schulberg/Waletzky Restoration) features one of the greatest courtroom dramas in history. NUREMBERG shows how the international prosecutors built their case against the top Nazi war criminals using the Nazis' own films and records.

            Following the documentary screening, a panel discussion will take place featuring Sandra Schulberg, Restoration Producer of the Documentary; Steve Hunegs, JCRC Executive Director; and Bruno Chaouat, Director of the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, University of Minnesota.

            The Nuremberg trial established the "Nuremberg principles" -- the foundation for all subsequent trials for war crimes and crimes against humanity. Though shown in Germany as part of the Allies' de-Nazification campaign, U.S. officials decided not to release NUREMBERG in America for political reasons, nor was it shown in any other country.

            Over the years, the picture negative and sound elements were lost or destroyed. The restoration uses original audio from the trial, allowing you to hear the defendants' and prosecutors' voices for the first time. The film ends with Justice Robert H. Jackson's stirring words --"Let Nuremberg stand as a warning to all who plan and wage aggressive war"-- words that leap the decades and make NUREMBERG startlingly contemporary.
            The special event screening is cosponsored by the Jewish Community Relations Council and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at the University of Minnesota.
            Tickets available by visiting the Lagoon Theater website or at the box office.
            Read:
            The Nuremberg Trials and their Legacy: USHMM Holocaust Encyclopedia
            A Long-Forgotten Film on the Nuremberg Trials Helps Rekindle Interest in the Holocaust: ABA Journal
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          • Letter of Support in Response to "Unreliable Websites" from the Middle East Studies Association (MESA)

            On November 30, 2010 The Turkish Coalition of America filed a lawsuit against the U of M, its President, and the director of CHGS Bruno Chaouat. The University of Minnesota filed a dismissal of the suit on December 17, 2010 and a hearing is scheduled for February 4, 2011. Below is a letter of support received from the Middle East Studies Association (MESA) in support of CHGS and the University.

            The Middle East Studies Association (MESA) is a private, non-profit, non-political learned society that brings together scholars, educators and those interested in the study of the region from all over the world. From its inception in 1966 with 50 founding members, MESA has increased its membership to more than 3,000 and now serves as an umbrella organization for more than sixty institutional members and thirty-nine affiliated organizations.

            The Middle East Studies Association (MESA) fosters the study of the Middle East, promotes high standards of scholarship and teaching, and encourages public understanding of the region and its peoples through programs, publications and services that enhance education, further intellectual exchange, recognize professional distinction, and defend academic freedom.


            January 18, 2011

            G. Lincoln McCurdy
            President, Turkish Coalition of America
            1025 Connecticut Avenue, NW Suite 1000
            Washington, DC 20036

            Dear Mr. McCurdy:

            I write to you on behalf of the Middle East Studies Association of North America (MESA) and its Committee on Academic Freedom to express our grave concern about your decision to file a lawsuit in November 2010 against the University of Minnesota and its Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. According to press reports, your lawsuit was prompted by the Center's listing of your organization's website as an "unreliable" source with respect to the history of Armenians in the final years of the Ottoman Empire.

            MESA was founded in 1966 to promote scholarship and teaching on the Middle East and North Africa. The preeminent organization in the field, the Association publishes the International Journal of Middle East Studies and has nearly 3000 members worldwide. MESA is committed to ensuring academic freedom and freedom of expression, both within the region and in connection with the study of the region in North America and elsewhere.

            Until recently, as part of its educational mission, the website of the University of Minnesota's Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies apparently included a section listing websites and web-based resources that scholars associated with the Center deemed to be "unreliable." Presumably, those scholars felt that assertions made on these websites and in these resources were not in keeping with accepted scholarly standards or the consensus among scholars and should therefore be treated with skepticism.

            We believe that the principles of academic freedom protect the right of the Center, and of scholars associated with it, to share their assessment of various perspectives with the public in this way. In any event, that section of the website was removed several days before your organization filed suit.

            Your organization, and those who hold perspectives different from those expressed by scholars associated with the Center, certainly have the right to participate in open scholarly exchange on the history of the Armenians in the late Ottoman Empire or any other issue, by presenting their views at academic conferences, in the pages of peer-reviewed scholarly journals or by other means, thereby opening them up to debate and challenge. We are distressed that you instead chose to take legal action against the University of Minnesota and its Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, apparently for having at one point characterized views expressed on your website in a certain way.

            We fear that legal action of this kind may have a chilling effect on the ability of scholars and academic institutions to carry out their work freely and to have their work assessed on its merits, in conformity with standards and procedures long established in the world of scholarship. Your lawsuit may thus serve to stifle the free expression of ideas among scholars and academic institutions regarding the history of Armenians in the later Ottoman Empire, and thereby undermine the principles of academic freedom.

            We do not believe that disagreements about historical issues should be addressed by lawsuits. We therefore call on you to reconsider and withdraw the legal action you have initiated against the University of Minnesota and its Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and we urge you to instead devote your organization's energies to fostering scholarly debate and exchange on this as on all other issues, in a manner that conforms to the standards and procedures adhered to by scholars and academic institutions and that respects their academic freedom.

            Sincerely,

            Suad Joseph
            MESA President
            Professor of Anthropology & Women's Studies, University of California, Davis

            cc: Bruno Chaouat, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, University of Minnesota

            Original letter in (PDF)
            Bruno Chaouat Response to "Unreliable Websites" November 30, 2010
            For news and links about the lawsuit

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          • Palin's 'Blood Libel' Video Fans Flames

            CHGS director Bruno Chaouat interviewed on Palin's use of the term "blood libel" on
            Fox 9 News.
            Updated: Wednesday, 12 Jan 2011, 9:46 PM CST
            Published : Wednesday, 12 Jan 2011, 9:45 PM CST
            by Maury Glover / FOX 9 News


            MINNEAPOLIS - Since the Tucson shooting, pundits and politicians have been pointing fingers at everything from lax guns laws to political rhetoric . But the national war of words escalated Wednesday when Sarah Palin entered the fray with the term "blood libel."

            The term blood libel isn't common in the United States - it was used mostly in Eastern Europe as a way of blaming Jews for the death of Jesus Christ. And Sarah Palin calling herself the victim of blood libel has upset some Jewish leaders.

            In a nearly 8-minute video on her Facebook page, Palin said she is being persecuted by political commentators and the media in the wake of the Tucson shooting .
            "Journalists and pundits should not manufacture a blood libel that severs only to incite the very violence it claims to condemn," Palin said.

            Bruno Chouat, director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at the University of Minnesota, says the term blood libel refers to the false belief that Jews use the blood of Christian children for religious rituals, and has been used as an excuse for anti-Semitism since the Middle Ages.

            Watch video and read the full article

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          • "Alternative Narratives or Denial?"

            The 'Jew' of cinema

            Haaretz
            December 17, 2010
            By Ariel Schweitzer


            The recent announcement that filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard's is to receive an honorary Oscar has ignited the controversy over his allegedly anti-Semitic and anti-American views, and his unwillingness to see the Jews in any position but that of the victim.

            Professor Philip Watts from Columbia University will speak in April about Godard, WWII, the Jews and the Holocaust at CHGS's lecture series, "Alternative Narratives or Denial?" Professor Watts will examine portions of Godard's work and discuss how his history may have shaped and informed his cinematographic choices which have led to the anti-Semitic charges. More information about the lecture series coming in January.

            The brouhaha that erupted in the United States and France recently over the decision to grant Jean-Luc Godard an honorary Academy Award - replete with accusations that Godard is anti-American, anti-Israel and even anti-Semitic - marks a new climax in the film director's convoluted relationship with American culture, with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and with Jewish issues.
            These fraught relations have been characterized by misunderstandings and confusion with respect to political critique and to philosophical and metaphysical questions, responsibility for which lies with both Godard and critics who have interpreted his work over the years.
            Godard, who turned 80 this month, was not always critical of American culture and politics. Like many members of his generation who witnessed Europe's liberation by U.S. armed forces, he was exposed to the plethora of movies, jazz and other elements of American popular culture that flooded the continent after the war. At the time, the United States was seen as a young, dynamic nation, in contrast to the conservative, staid European society, which had been "tarnished" in moral terms by World War II. As a critic for the magazine Cahiers du cinema, Godard extolled American film and saw its great creators - Alfred Hitchcock, John Ford and Howard Hawks - as "auteurs" even before they were recognized as such in the States.
            Moreover, Godard's early films, like those of many of his fellow directors of the French New Wave, were homages to American cinema. "Breathless," his first feature-length film, in 1959, is a variation on American gangster movies; 1961's "Une femme est une femme" is a direct reference to musical comedy.
            This viewpoint began to change with the politicization of Godard's cinema in the mid-1960s. In films such as "Pierrot le fou" (1965 ), "2 or 3 Things I Know About Her" (1967), and "Week End" (1967 ), Godard mapped modern consumer society by means of its array of symbols. His criticism was directed at the time not only at French society, but also at the United States, cradle of the capitalist system, which he accused of economic and cultural imperialism.
            In 1967 Godard also directed a segment in the collaborative film "Far from Vietnam," which slammed America's military involvement beyond its borders. This work heralded his abandonment of traditional cinema, the notion of the director as "auteur," and a decision to work from then on outside the established industry.
            After the riots between students, workers and police in Paris in May '68, Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin, a political activist with a Marxist orientation, founded a political film collective named after the Soviet director Dziga Vertov. In this framework, Godard had directed some 10 films by 1972. One of the topics he dealt with was the Third World and his struggle against Western imperialism. This was also the moment when Israel entered his oeuvre - as America's representative in the Middle East and the oppressor of the Palestinians, whom Godard identified with the Third World and with his support for liberation and independence.
            In 1970, Groupe Dziga Vertov, with funding from by the Arab League, went to Jordan to shoot a pro-Palestinian propaganda film called "Until Victory." They spent several weeks following the training of Palestinian guerrillas. Godard returned to France with the footage (shot in 16mm ) and embarked on the editing. But then came news of the Black September events, in which the army of Jordan's King Hussein massacred thousands of Palestinians (including many who had been filmed by Groupe Dziga Vertov ), in order to prevent a Palestinian takeover of the Hashemite kingdom.
            The shocked Godard realized that he might be lacking a sufficient understanding of the complexity of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and inter-Arab relations and decided to abandon the film. In 1974, however, he incorporated footage from it into a new film, which he edited with video technology for the first time. In this work, "Ici et ailleurs" ("Here and Elsewhere" ), Godard looked at how Third World struggles are perceived in France and how the Israeli-Palestinian conflict could serve to illuminate problems of class relations, coercion and exploitation in the Western world. It includes an outrageous visual analogy between the figures of Golda Meir and Hitler (to a soundtrack of the Kaddish prayer being recited for victims of the Holocaust ) - an image whose meaning is difficult to mistake: The Jew, erstwhile victim, is seen as the oppressor of the Palestinians. That image, which in the 1970s barely caused a stir (also because of the film's limited distribution ), over time became a sort of black hole, "absorbing" all the claims of those who consider Godard to be an anti-Semite.
            In fact, the first to detect such feelings in Godard was actually Francois Truffaut, his close friend from the French New Wave period during the 1960s. In 1973, in a sharp letter that spelled the end of their friendship (and which became public only in 1988 , after Truffaut's death), Truffaut mentioned that Godard used to call his producer, Pierre Braunberger, a "filthy Jew." Truffaut also mocked Godard's militant political views: "After all, those who called you a genius, no matter what you did, all belonged to that famous trendy left. But you - you're the Ursula Andress of militancy; you make a brief appearance, just enough time for the cameras to flash. You make two or three duly startling remarks and then you disappear again, trailing clouds of self-serving mystery."
            Focus on the Holocaust
            In the '80s Godard's preoccupation with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict expanded into a metaphysical discussion of the Jewish question, and the Holocaust became a central theme in his work. He drew upon the teachings of French philosopher Gilles Deleuze, who held that the emergence of the death camps was the formative event of the 20th century, and that the crisis in Western society, epitomized by Auschwitz, was also reflected in the concurrent birth of modern cinema.
            In this spirit, Godard dealt almost obsessively with the experience of the camps. In his "Histoire(s) du cinema" (1989), he relates to cinema's treachery in serving the propagandist machinery of the Third Reich, although he also mentions that cinema "saved the honor of reality" by documenting the atrocities of the war as soon as the Nazi camps were liberated. He expressed an identification with the fate of the Jewish people, and even proclaimed himself "juif du cinema" - reflecting the sentiment that he was persecuted and banned from his home, indeed from his continent, and sentenced to perpetual exile. (In his letter, Truffaut also mocked Godard's tendency to present himself as a victim, even early on in his career. )
            In this connection Godard resorted to certain analogies that began to arouse discomfort, to say the least. In the 1995 audiovisual essay "JLG/JLG - autoportrait de decembre," he dealt with the figure of the "Musulman," the living dead of the concentration camps, and emphasized that the root of that word is "Muslim." In view of his preoccupation with the Palestinian tragedy, that statement was once again interpreted as an effort to make an analogy between the fate of the Jews in the Holocaust and that of the Palestinians under the Israeli occupation.
            Godard never confirmed such interpretations. He generally tends to present his oeuvre as poetic, associative art, but it is precisely this poetic quality that leaves his films open to interpretation and misunderstanding. What can be seen as the filmmaker's legitimate criticism of the Israeli occupation and his support for the Palestinians' struggle for freedom and independence (which he was among the first movie directors to take an interest in ) lose their validity when Godard equates - even if obliquely - the fate of the Palestinians with the fate of the Jews in the Holocaust. The Palestinian tragedy is serious enough and does not need the "support" of such comparisons, which detract from consideration of the specific, political nature of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and even spill over into the amorphous and fraught territory of theology and myth.
            Moreover, it seems that in recent years Godard has been making deliberate use of provocation in order to stay in the headlines at a time when his films no longer resonate with a wide audience. His latest effort, "Filme socialisme," which came out this year and was seen in France by only 25,000 people, decries the death of the socialist utopia in the Europe of the third millennium, portrayed as a continent in crisis, which celebrates its decline as in the last days of Pompeii. The setting of the film, and its main metaphor is a pleasure boat that cruises between Mediterranean cities. Among the passengers is a Jewish capitalist, Goldberg, whose name Godard takes the trouble of translating literally into French as "gold mountain."
            About a year before the film came out, Le Monde ran a long piece on the Jewish themes in Godard's work, which included testimony from Alain Fleischer which provoked a huge controversy in France. Fleischer, who directed the film "Fragments of Conversations with Jean-Luc Godard" (2007 ), said the Godard equated Palestinian suicide bombers with Jews who "sacrificed" themselves in the gas chambers in the name of the establishment of the State of Israel. Godard has never confirmed this, but he has also, as is quite typical, never denied it.
            No middle ground
            Godard is without a doubt anti-Zionist, but moreover he instills his political vision with a metaphysical dimension of the sort that is incapable of accepting the figure of the Jew as anything but a victim. In the filmmaker's view, the moment we are talking about a Jew who is an Israeli - and thus someone who no longer can claim to be a victim, per se - he necessarily becomes an executioner. Between the extremes of victim and executioner there is no middle ground, of the kind that would illuminate the political conflict from a slightly more complex perspective.
            In a similar way, throughout his career, Godard developed an ideal, utopian image of Diaspora Judaism as universal, humane and spiritual, and an image of Zionism - and by implication, Israeliness - as isolationist, self-absorbed and aggressive. This dichotomy, which is at the heart of Godard's rejection of Jewish nationalism, ignores the fact that Zionism, at least at its inception, drew its inspiration in the late 19th century from the universal and modern ideas of the Enlightenment (that is, normalization of the Jewish condition, national liberation, socialism and humanism ), whereas during many chapters in its history, Diaspora Judaism was (and to a certain extent is still today ) characterized by community, if not isolationism.
            Godard's obsession with Jewish matters was given riveting expression in his film "Notre musique" (2004 ). In the film, a Haaretz correspondent (played by Sarah Adler ) comes to Sarajevo to interview the Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish (played by the late poet himself ). Darwish tells her that the Palestinians are lucky that their conflict is with the Jews, since the world takes an ongoing interest in the Jews and thus is also interested in the fate of the Palestinians. "You handed us a defeat and granted us glory at the same time," Darwish adds. "You are our ministry of propaganda, because the world is interested in you, not in us. I have no illusions on that score."
            Does not such a comment - which Godard could after all have omitted from the film - attest to a modicum of awareness regarding Europe's problematic perception of the Middle East conflict, which is tainted by no small amount of self-righteousness, guilt feelings (over the Holocaust, and also over the Continent's colonial past ), and occasionally also dogmatism?
            Dr. Ariel Schweitzer is a film historian and critic for the French magazine Cahiers du cinema.
            This story is by: Ariel Schweitzer

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          • Response to "Unreliable Websites"

            This statement is in response to articles published in the Pioneer Press on 11-19-2010 and in the Minnesota Daily on 11-23-10 regarding the removal of "unreliable websites" from the website of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS) at the University of Minnesota.

            I assumed directorship of CHGS in July 2010. Since then, I have focused on promoting the Center's mission of research, education and outreach. I have been speaking with the community and with colleagues on campus to communicate the new initiatives and intellectual orientation of the Center.

            My staff and I have invested much effort in trying to update the Center's website. Part of this updating process bears on the educational section, and its listing of websites that CHGS perceives as unreliable sources of information for students and researchers. I decided to remove the section providing links to "unreliable websites." My rationale was quite simple: never promote, even negatively, sources of illegitimate information.

            During almost twenty years working in higher education, I have never put a dubious source on a syllabus for my students, not even for the purpose of delegitimizing the source. The decision to remove the links to "unreliable websites" was made before the Turkish Coalition of America began its efforts to intimidate CHGS into removing the links. The links were replaced with legitimate information devoted to the history, ideology and psychology of Holocaust and genocide denial.

            On behalf of the CHGS, I want to reiterate that in accordance with the vast majority of serious and rigorous historians, the CHGS considers the massacre of the Armenians during World War I as a case of genocide. To insinuate, as the articles published in the newspapers mentioned above, that the mission of CHGS is somehow influenced and biased by donors' money is incorrect.

            Genocide and Holocaust denial is an important issue for CHGS. When I took over the direction of the Center, I put together a lecture series on this very question. This series will begin in 2011 and will continue in the academic year of 2011-12. I invite all persons interested in the issue of genocide and Holocaust denial to attend the lectures and participate in our discussions.

            Bruno Chaouat
            Director



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          • Following the Story

            Does Academic Freedom Protect Holocaust Deniers?

            Replies from Cary Nelson and Naomi Schaefer Riley
            The Chronicle of Higher Education

            Please see the full article at The Chronicle for Higher Education for the complete article and other comments.

            Cary Nelson Replies

            It is not actually tenure that may shield Kaukab Siddique from sanctions for his public statements about the Holocaust; it is academic freedom, a value that survives only if it protects remarks we despise as well as those we endorse. If Siddique were to be punished, he would no doubt immediately claim that his academic freedom had been violated. That would trigger due process and a hearing before a committee of his peers, whether he was a tenured faculty member, a first-year assistant professor, or an adjunct faculty member teaching a single course.


            Siddique is certainly trying to "game the system," but his fanaticism may nonetheless lead him where he should not go. The issue in a hearing would be professional fitness, which is a matter to be determined by a faculty review or hearing committee. That involves academic judgments about professional competence and professional boundaries. The American Association of University Professors distinguishes between speech that can be held to standards of professional competence and speech that has no bearing on professional competence. A biologist who asserts that the theory of evolution is a hoax would be in danger of demonstrating himself or herself unfit.
            Holocaust denial may have comparable status for someone teaching world literature.
            Disagreeing about the meaning of the Holocaust is entirely permissible and, indeed, inevitable. The meaning of a historical event is always open to debate. It cannot be permanently settled. Nor can one assume one has all the facts now. New documents may be discovered indefinitely. But the fundamental truth that the Nazis successfully carried out an organized, even industrialized, program that killed millions of Jews is not in dispute.
            Some have claimed further that comparing Israel to Nazi Germany is a factual error comparable to Holocaust denial, but I cannot agree. Comparing Israel to Nazi Germany is a hyperbolic political analogy, an interpretation one may support or dispute, but it does not rise to the level of Holocaust denial. My reactions to Siddique's remarks are a mix of anger and sadness. He has absurdly asserted that there is "not one" document proving the Holocaust occurred. He has looked into the hollow gaze of concentration-camp victims and declared they were starving only because Allied bombing disrupted German food distribution. That suggests Siddique's humanity is distorted and degraded, but it is only his professional fitness that is at issue in reviewing his academic status.

            Naomi Schaefer Riley Replies
            Lincoln University claims to be the oldest historically black college in the country. Its graduates include Langston Hughes and Thurgood Marshall. Today Lincoln is employing a professor who has called the Holocaust a myth. Kaukab Siddique's "humanity is distorted and degraded," in the words of Cary Nelson. And yet, unless Siddique is teaching something directly related to the Holocaust, Nelson believes he has a legitimate claim to keeping his position. The school's most prominent graduates and its namesake are probably rolling over in their graves, but in the name of academic freedom, Siddique must stay.
            In the process of standing up for the "remarks we despise as well as those we endorse," Nelson has lost sight of the noble principles that undergird this country and its educational institutions. Defending hateful statements is not the only good here. Professors should be not only passers-on of information; they should be models of intellectual and moral integrity. The idea that we should overlook Siddique's "distorted and degraded humanity" and consider only his "professional fitness" is plainly offensive.
            I would add that Cary Nelson's attempt to divorce tenure from academic freedom is nothing short of baffling. For decades we have heard that tenure is vital to protecting academic freedom, but now it turns out that the AAUP thinks professors without tenure would be protected just the same. In fact, the way tenure has evolved, it is virtually impossible to get rid of faculty members who have it, even if they are, amazingly, Holocaust deniers.
            It is hard to imagine that Lincoln would keep on Siddique or that Northwestern would have continued to put up with Arthur Butz were it not for their tenured status. Maybe there are adjunct or assistant professors with similarly offensive views out there, but I haven't heard about them. Some may think that's a sign that universities are failing to defend remarks they despise, but I think a university free of Holocaust deniers is something to be proud of. Which goes to show how low we have set the bar.
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          • Does Academic Freedom Protect Holocaust Deniers?

            This continues the coverage over the debate of Holocaust Denial in an academic setting in the case of Kaukab Siddique, who teaches literature and mass communications at Lincoln University, in Pennsylvania.

            Reprinted from the The Chronicle of Higher Education

            November 7, 2010
            Does Academic Freedom Protect Holocaust Deniers?
            Two views on the question


            Michael Morgenstern for The Chronicle
            Response by Cary Nelson
            Response by Naomi Schaefer Riley


            It Depends on the Context
            By Cary Nelson

            Imagine the following classroom conversations:

            Student in a world-literature class: "I'd like to write my final paper on Holocaust poetry. I'm trying to decide whether Yevgeny Yevtushenko's 'Babi Yar,' Paul Celan's 'Todesfuge,' or Jorie Graham's 'Annunciation With a Bullet in It' is the best poem."

            Faculty member's answer: "You cannot take up that question unless you recognize that the poems are all flawed fantasies. None are based on fact. The Holocaust never happened."

            Student in a political-science or philosophy class: "Which man-made disaster is worse: Bhopal or the Holocaust?"

            Faculty member's answer: "There's no excuse for Bhopal. It didn't have to happen. But the Holocaust didn't actually happen at all. Give me a better comparison."

            I could generate numerous similar scenarios. A student in a medieval-history course, for example, might contrast a natural catastrophe, the Black Death, with the Holocaust. A student in an art-history class might write about Holocaust painting or sculpture; a student in a music-history course study the role of music in the concentration camps; a student in an ethics class consider the burden the Holocaust has placed on future generations. Nothing in those syllabi might suggest beforehand that the Holocaust will arise, but it can--and does.


            In some fields, the shadow of the Holocaust looms large, Modern European history being the most obvious. Basic knowledge about the Holocaust is a reasonable expectation for a 20th-century historian or literary critic. A faculty member who is a Holocaust denier might face a competence hearing before his or her peers--under certain circumstances. But one needs to know what he or she said, and in what context. The details matter.
            Whether a faculty member recognizes that the Holocaust looms large in a field like postwar American or European literature depends in part on whether he or she is inclined to look. But academic freedom certainly means that a person can teach courses in those areas without ever mentioning the subject. It also means that faculty members teaching in those fields should not be required to be knowledgeable about Holocaust literature.
            Although it is part of the critical field of reference for contemporary literary history, so, too, are many other subjects, which individual scholars may never master.
            Certain subjects, like the Arab-Israeli conflict, are likely to provoke discussion of the Holocaust whether or not a faculty member plans for it. And any course covering genocide--whether it be the near-extermination of American Indians, the Armenian genocide in World War I, or the mass murders in Rwanda in 1994--is almost certain to evoke Holocaust comparisons.
            The probability of the Holocaust's arising in class discussion is impossible to calculate for many disciplines, but it is certainly possible throughout the arts and humanities. Holocaust denial can be pedagogically disabling.
            That takes us to Kaukab Siddique, who teaches literature and mass communications at Lincoln University, in Pennsylvania. He has used public forums outside the classroom to declare the Holocaust a "hoax." He cites writers like David Irving and the white supremacist Mark Weber. Siddique maintains that, in promoting Holocaust denial, he is simply speaking for the "other side" of the issue. But there is no credible "other side." No respectable historian advocates Holocaust denial.
            To be sure, in some disciplines--engineering, veterinary medicine, accounting, chemistry, home economics--the Holocaust is largely irrelevant. If a student brought up the subject in those classes, the instructor could well declare it outside the boundaries of the course and move on to other matters. And professors can say what they want about the Holocaust in public settings. Writers on academic freedom like to cite the example of Northwestern University's notorious Holocaust-denying engineer Arthur R. Butz, who keeps his views out of the classroom.
            But Siddique is walking a finer line. He is broaching Holocaust denial off campus, while teaching in a discipline in which the Holocaust has definite relevance. His university has appropriately said he cannot be fired simply for his extramural statements. He could even repeat those statements in a public forum on campus and be protected. It is less clear, however, that he could declare the Holocaust a fiction in class. A key question is whether, in a field like Siddique's, Holocaust denial merits a hearing before a committee of his peers. Is his professional fitness at issue?
            Of course, we need to protect a very wide range of extramural freedom of expression. Unqualified efforts to suppress even so loathsome an endeavor as Holocaust denial carry their own dangers. The most obvious corrective on campus to Siddique's extramural Holocaust disinformation is other people's demonstrating that he is a deluded ideologue. Still, his extramural speech may at least merit a university warning that he has put himself at risk.
            If a version of one of the hypothetical conversations I offered at the outset were to take place between him and a student, a hearing and penalties might result. Even then, a faculty member's entire record as a teacher and scholar should be considered before the ultimate penalty of dismissal could be applied. I have no evidence that Siddique has tried to impose his views in class, but the controversy over his extracurricular remarks reminds us there is a bright line that must not be crossed.
            We must also recognize that some efforts to establish that line are not compatible with academic freedom. It would be a violation for colleges to enforce the "Working Definition of Antisemitism," issued by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights. While the text provides good suggestions for evaluating potentially anti-Semitic statements on campus, imposing sanctions on those who violate any of its protocols would trespass on academic freedom. Students have advocated enforcing it, but that would be a misuse of the document. It was never intended to police campus speech.
            The definition includes drawing "comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis"--though that is essentially what the sociologist William I. Robinson, of the University of California at Santa Barbara, did in a 2009 e-mail to students that compared Israel's Gaza incursion to the Holocaust. I defended his right to do so, and the university cleared him after an unnecessary and potentially chilling investigation.
            People are free to criticize Robinson, but the university had no cause to consider penalizing him. I also maintained that the arguments of Neve Gordon, a faculty member at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, in favor of an escalating boycott of his own country were protected by academic freedom. On the other hand, both the American Association of University Professors and I have consistently opposed boycotts of Israeli faculty members and universities by other countries.
            Faculty members could also take issue with the term "Holocaust" itself, preferring another designation. Or they might analyze the ideological deployment of the Holocaust and offer a critique of the cultural and political privilege it is granted, or ask why some forms of historical denial make news and others (like denial of the Armenian massacre) often do not. But faculty members cannot stand before a class and announce that the Nazis did not kill six million Jews, along with numerous homosexuals, Gypsies, disabled citizens, and political opponents. I would not knowingly hire a Holocaust denier or grant one tenure in a discipline to which the Holocaust is relevant. A college does not benefit from institutionalizing ignorance and hatred.
            Siddique's public comments have increased the likelihood that his students will ask him about the Holocaust in class. If he refuses to discuss his views, he may lose his students' respect, although that price is one he is apparently willing to pay by making his comments in the first place. Student reaction is not the university's immediate concern, despite the impact it might have on student evaluations. But if he argues for his views in class, he could face a hearing. Determining whether his ability to function as a faculty member has been fatally undermined may await further events. I have seen no evidence that Siddique should be fired, but academic freedom does not protect all of the actions that can flow from Holocaust denial.
            Since historical accuracy is the determining issue, Holocaust denial is not inherently an example of speech that is politically controversial, although it certainly has been deployed for political purposes. Academe has no business enforcing conformity to political or religious beliefs or to matters about which there is substantive academic debate. But to describe Holocaust denial as fundamentally, rather than strategically, political is to fall short of the intellectual courage and professional responsibility necessary to describe it accurately. Holocaust denial is speech promoting falsity as truth. Unlike myriad lesser errors that academics might make, errors for which their competence should not be reviewed, Holocaust denial counters fundamental and well-established knowledge. It is also effectively hate speech, whatever the intent of the speaker. It denies people their history and obliterates the fate of their relatives on the basis of their religion and ethnicity.
            The larger problem for faculty members who engage in Holocaust denial lies elsewhere. It is grounded in the question of disciplinary competence, but it also exceeds that question. Holocaust denial calls into serious question a faculty member's overall professional competence--the capacity to weigh evidence, to undertake rational analysis, to perform academic responsibilities reliably. I do not pretend that either this or the other questions I have raised are subject to easy answers. Nor do I pretend that my answers are definitive. But there is reason to discuss them.
            Cary Nelson is a professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and president of the American Association of University Professors. His most recent book is No University Is an Island: Saving Academic Freedom (New York University Press, 2010).

            Apparently, if You're in the Right Discipline
            By Naomi Schaefer Riley
            It isn't easy being Cary Nelson. The president of the American Association of University Professors sometimes has to decide which Holocaust deniers in the academy he will defend and which ones he will not. Nelson recently said there were grounds to question the competency of Kaukab Siddique, associate professor of English and journalism at Lincoln University, in Pennsylvania, who has been publicly declaiming against the legitimacy of the state of Israel and suggesting that the Holocaust was a "hoax." On other occasions, though, the AAUP has rushed to the defense of professors who don't believe six million Jews were murdered by the Nazis. The AAUP's reasoning in those cases requires the kind of intellectual backflipping that no amateur should attempt. And those gymnastics reveal just how bizarre our understanding of academic freedom has become.
            Let's start with Siddique. In a pro-Palestinian rally in Washington in September, he proclaimed: "I say to the Muslims, 'Dear brothers and sisters, unite and rise up against this Hydra-headed monster which calls itself Zionism. ... Each one of us is their target, and we must stand united to defeat, to destroy, to dismantle Israel--if possible, by peaceful means." (But if not, well ... he'll leave that to your imagination.) In an online newsletter called New Trend Magazine, he has called the Holocaust a "myth" and a "story."
            Nelson says that criticizing the legitimacy of the state of Israel is well within the bounds of academic discourse. No surprise there, as anyone who has followed the trends of Middle East studies can tell you. But Nelson also says that a faculty member's criticism of Israel could cross the line into anti-Semitism, depending on what was said and in what context. According to Nelson, what academic freedom does not cover, on or off campus, are statements that call into question the ability of a scholar to teach his or her discipline.
            As for Siddique, apparently Nelson thinks it is a problem for any humanities faculty member to engage in Holocaust denial, and that's why he believes Lincoln University would have grounds at least to investigate Siddique's professional competence. Really? It matters only if your Holocaust denier is teaching literature, say, or history? This is a distinction that will leave a lot of nonacademics scratching their heads.
            But that's the distinction that has allowed Arthur Butz, a professor of electrical engineering at Northwestern University, to remain in his position for more than three decades, despite his own public record of Holocaust denial. In 1976, Butz's book The Hoax of the Twentieth Century: The Case Against the Presumed Extermination of European Jewry was published in the United States. He doesn't seem to have rethought his position much since then. Several years ago, in an interview with the Iranian press, Butz was asked about Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's views on the Holocaust. His reply: "I congratulate him on becoming the first head of state to speak out clearly on these issues and regret only that it was not a Western head of state."
            So how does Arthur Butz get a free pass while Kaukab Siddique could merit a competency hearing in accord with the AAUP's position? Nelson has said that, for Butz, the issue is irrelevant because the Holocaust has nothing to do with his teaching or research. In fact, Butz's presence at Northwestern is a constant reminder not--as its mission statement suggests--that the university is committed to the "personal and intellectual growth of its students in a diverse academic community," but rather that Northwestern is reaffirming its commitment to not running afoul of the ivory-tower authorities.
            What would be funny about all this--if Holocaust denial were a laughing matter--is that Siddique himself has clearly figured out how to game the system. He told Inside Higher Ed recently that he is entitled to the protections of academic freedom precisely because this isn't his area of study. "I'm not an expert on the Holocaust," he said. "If I deny or support it, it doesn't mean anything."
            You see, Siddique seems to be claiming, he's just like Arthur Butz. As long he doesn't engage in the study of the Holocaust in his job, his speech falls under the protections of academic freedom. Indeed, Siddique is a man who has the American academy completely figured out. "We can't just sit back in judgment and say those guys were bad and we were the good guys," he said. "I always try to look at both sides. ... That's part of being a professor." And if that language of moral equivalency weren't enough to ingratiate himself with his fellow academics, he also expressed concern about the interference of nonacademics into the affairs of universities. (Numerous politicians and pundits have called for an investigation into his activities.)
            Even if they may have landed on opposite sides of the AAUP's academic-freedom line, what Siddique and Butz do have in common is that they are both tenured, which means it would be almost impossible to get rid of either one, should either of their institutions attempt it. Earlier this month, Lincoln University announced that it "cannot take action at this time" regarding Siddique's statements. But just think about the possible scenario if Lincoln decides in the future to take action because, as the AAUP would have it, the Holocaust falls within Siddique's academic purview. Imagine the scene in which Kaukab Siddique testifies that he can't be punished because he is not an expert on whether the Holocaust occurred and Cary Nelson claims that, yes, in fact, he is.
            It's enough to make you wonder if maybe we need to rethink what we mean by academic freedom.
            Naomi Schaefer Riley is author of God on the Quad: How Religious Colleges and the Missionary Generation Are Changing America (St. Martin's Press, 2005). Her book on tenure will be published by Rowman & Littlefield in the spring.
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          • Holocaust-era mass grave discovered

            Find out how this is possible- Come to the final screening of Einsatzgruppen: The Death Brigades. Sunday, November 7, 6:30 p.m. St. Anthony Main Theater. For ticket info Minnesota Film Arts.

            (UKPA) - 6 hours ago
            A Holocaust-era mass grave containing the bodies of an estimated 100 Jews killed by Romanian troops has been discovered in a forest, researchers have said, offering further evidence of the country's involvement in wartime crimes.

            The discovery, in a forest near the Romanian town of Popricani, contained the bodies of men, women and children who were shot dead in 1941, the Elie Wiesel National Institute for the Study of the Holocaust in Romania said in a statement on Friday.

            The find offered evidence of pogroms against Jews in the region, scholars said, campaigns that were long minimised in a country whose official history taught that Germans were the sole perpetrators of the Holocaust.
            Sketchy reports about the possibility of a mass grave in the forest began to appear in 2002 and local authorities began an investigation, but it was later suspended after nothing was found.
            Experts resumed the investigation at the site and began interviewing witnesses again in 2009, according to Romanian historian Adrian Cioflanca.
            Some 280,000 Jews and 11,000 Roma, or Gypsies, were killed during the pro-fascist regime of dictator Marshal Ion Antonescu, who was prime minister from 1940 to 1944 and executed by the communists in 1946. Romania today has only 6,000 Jews.
            Historians have documented several pogroms in Romania during the Second World War, including one in June 1941 in the north-eastern city of Iasi where up to 12,000 people are believed to have died as Romanian and German soldiers swept from house to house killing Jews.
            Those who did not die were systematically beaten, put in cattle wagons in stifling heat and taken to a small town, where what happened to them would be concealed. Of the 120 people on the train, just 24 survived.
            Romania's role in the Holocaust remains a sensitive and highly charged topic. During communist times, the country largely ignored the involvement of Romania's leaders in wartime crimes.
            The country's role in the Holocaust and the deportation of Jews were minimised by subsequent governments after communism collapsed in 1989. In 2004 after a dispute with Israel over comments about the Holocaust, then-President Ion Iliescu assembled an international panel led by Nobel-prize winner Elie Wiesel to investigate the Holocaust in Romania.
            Copyright © 2010 The Press Association. All rights reserved.
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          • Einsatzgruppen: The Death Brigades to be shown in its Entirety


            Sunday, November 7- Michael Prazan's documentary, Einsatzgruppen: The Death Brigades will be shown in its entirety with a brief intermission. After the screening please join us for a question and answer session with the filmmaker and gain further insights into the making of this important film.

            St. Anthony Main Theater
            115 Main St SE
            Minneapolis
            Tickets: $6.00 students /senior $8.50 general admission

            To purchase advanced tickets please visit the Minnesota Film Arts site.


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          • What Turns "Ordinary" Citizens into Mass Murderers?

            This question is often asked when studying the Holocaust and other genocides. This week French filmmaker Michael Prazan will touch on this question with his groundbreaking documentary Einsatzgruppen: The Death Brigades, being shown exclusively in the Twin Cities on Thursday, November 4 and Sunday November 7 at the St. Anthony Main Theater. Prazan and the film are being sponsored by the University of Minnesota's Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS) with Minnesota Film Arts.
            Thumbnail image for einsatzgruppen.jpg

            "Einsatzgruppen: The Death Brigades is an essential film for those eager to understand the mechanics of evil and prevent its recurrence," said, Bruno Chaouat, director for CHGS.

            "I think we all have a concept of what we individually believe evil to look like, but as we have found it isn't quite as clear cut as it would seem. Hannah Arendt in her controversial report Eichmann in Jerusalem identified the men who perpetrated the crimes representing what she called the banality of evil. Christopher Browning, in his landmark work Ordinary Men took Arendt's argument one step further focusing on the many so called "normal" Germans who turned into mass murders. Prazan's film, blending Claude Lanzmann's (the director of the acclaimed Holocaust documentary Shoah) method of interviewing witnesses, survivors and perpetrators with archive footage, adds his own, original voice to this descent into the night of human soul."


            When asked why he wanted to make the film Prazan replied, "I thought there was an important part of Holocaust history that had been overlooked by the West. They seemed mostly concerned with the extermination of Western Jews and obsessed with Auschwitz. I felt it important that the actions of the Einsatzgruppen were explored more in depth."
            The catalyst for the film was based on Prazan's experience while making his film Nanjing Massacre. "What I discovered in making that film was the willingness of the soldiers to tell me their stories-and I thought why not the Germans? I knew I would have to act quickly as time was not on our side."
            In addition to the testimonies of witnesses, perpetrators and scholars, Prazan uses previously unseen archival footage, some in color, shot by the Germans. Prazan's mosaic of hatred has a startling immediacy that moves well beyond a historical document.
            "Seeing this film is to stand in the eye of the storm." Said Bruno Chaouat, "and should not be missed."
            Einsatzgruppen: The Death Brigades will be screened Thursday, November 4 at 7:00 p.m. and Sunday, November 7 at 6:30 p.m. followed by a question and answer session with filmmaker Michael Prazan. St. Anthony Main Theater, 115 Main Street SE, Mpls. Tickets: $6.00 for students, $8.50 for adults. Tickets can be purchased on line at Minnesota Film Arts. For more information contact CHGS at 612-624-0256, or email chgs@umn.edu.
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          • Jean-Luc Godard, anti-Semite?

            Bruno Chaouat, director

            jean-luc-godard.jpg

            It was recently announced by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences that Jean-Luc Godard, the Swiss-French filmmaker, will receive an honorary Oscar at this year's ceremony (see article from Jewish Journal posted by CHGS on October 16th, 2010). With this announcement came articles, blog posts and op-eds referring to the filmmaker's real or alleged anti-Semitism.

            It is important for the world of scholarship to connect with current events, and we post these articles in order to examine these events with a sense of nuance and depth that the complexity of culture and history requires. While journalism often makes the complexity of the world accessible at the cost of simplifying it, the mission of an academic center such as ours is to approach this complexity with rigor, scientific and intellectual integrity and without sensationalizing.

            It is particularly timely that Professor Philip Watts from Columbia University will speak in April about Godard, WWII, the Jews and the Holocaust at CHGS's lecture series, "Alternative Narratives or Denial?" Professor Watts will examine portions of Godard's work and discuss how his history may have shaped and informed his cinematographic choices which have led to the anti-Semitic charges.

            We look forward to this exchange, and will continue to look at current events and provide a platform to lead us into deeper inquiry beyond the headlines.


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          • The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at the University of Minnesota presents the groundbreaking documentary Einsatzgruppen: The Death Brigades

            einsatzgruppen.jpg

            Thursday, November 4 at 7:00p.m.
            Sunday, November 7 at 6:30p.m.

            Followed by a question and answer session with filmmaker Michael Prazan
            Moderated by Rembert Hueser
            Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch Studies
            and Moving Image Studies

            St. Anthony Main Theater
            115 Main St SE
            Minneapolis
            Tickets: $6.00 students /senior $8.50 general admission


            Untitled-1-b2617.jpg
            Michael Prazan's documentary details the SS killing squads charged with destroying entire Jewish populations in occupied Eastern Europe during World War II. Referred to as the "Holocaust by Bullets," the mobile death units moved through Eastern Europe into Soviet territories in 1941, recruiting assistants in the Baltics and the Ukraine to help them carry out the extermination of the Jews in towns, cities and villages. The brigades were only a prelude to the mass exterminations that followed at the death camps in Poland.
            The film contains previously unseen archival footage, much of it in color, some shot as home movies by the Germans themselves. Prazan interviews historians, Holocaust survivors, witnesses, and perpetrators to give a complete view of the horror and scale of this operation which was responsible for the deaths of millions of innocent Jewish families.
            French filmmaker Michael Prazan lived in Japan for several years while making his first two films The Nanking Massacre: Memory and Oblivion (2006) and Japan, the Red Years (2002), about the terrorist tendencies of some of Japan's May '68 children. He has written a book on the making of the Einsatzgruppen film, which will be published in France later this year.
            Co-sponsors: Minnesota Film Arts, University of Minnesota Department of History, Department of French and Italian, Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch Studies, Moving Image Studies, Center for Jewish Studies and the Human Rights Center at the School of Law.
            To read a review of the film click here.
            For information on Einsatzgruppen click here
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          • CHGS to hold Open House October 26

            The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies invites you to an Open House
            Tuesday, October 26, 2010 4:00pm-7:00pm Room 760 Social Science Building, 267 19th Ave. S. University of Minnesota.

            Join us for a tour of our new offices and resource library, learn about upcoming programs, and meet new director Bruno Chaouat and the CHGS staff.

            Wine and light refreshments will be served. We look forward to meeting you.

            To RSVP or for more information please contact us at 612-624-0256 or e-mail chgs@umn.edu

            Parking is available in the 19th Ave. Ramp (300 19th Ave. S.) and the 21st Ave. Ramp (400 21st Ave. S.)



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          • U of M's College of Liberal Arts Names Bruno Chaouat Director of Holocaust and Genocide Center

            French professor envisions increased programming around cultural, historical and philosophical issues regarding the Holocaust and genocide

            chaouatBruno.jpgThe University of Minnesota College of Liberal Arts has named Bruno Chaouat as the new director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Chaouat (ôshow-AHTö), an associate professor in French, has been at the University of Minnesota since 2002. His academic research addresses, among other topics, post-Holocaust art and literature. He has written essays in French and in English on the current debates about the representation of the Holocaust in visual arts. His work also examines the ideological, political and philosophical challenges faced by Jews in France. He focuses on the polemics of the new anti-Semitism in relation to the current Middle East conflict.

            Chaouat assumed the directorship on July 1, and has already begun putting together a lecture series for 2010-11 that will address "Alternative Narrativesùor Denial?" Two speakers in that series will include Professor Henry Rousso (CNRS, Institut d'Histoire du temps present, Paris) and Professor Jeffrey Mehlman (Boston University), who will both speak in spring 2011.
            Plans are also being finalized to bring to Minneapolis the filmmaker Michael Prazan, who will present his film "Einsatzgruppen: the Death Brigades," considered the most important documentary to date on the Holocaust by bullets (Eastern Europe), this November. Chaouat is also building a partnership with Universite de Paris VII-Diderot, whose Department of Sciences Humaines Cliniques has a highly regarded program on trauma, genocide and psychoanalysis.
            "I am very pleased that we are able to appoint a director who has Bruno's long-time experience on both the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and Center for Jewish Studies advisory boards," says James A. Parente, Jr., dean of the College of Liberal Arts. "His deep involvement with CHGS will lend itself to extending the legacy of founding director Stephen Feinstein, and his background in the humanities will bring many innovative directions to the center's research, teaching, and outreach missions."
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          • Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies Names Jodi Elowitz as Outreach Coordinator

            jodi_elowitz.jpgCenter for Holocaust and Genocide Studies has named Jodi Elowitz as their new outreach coordinator. Ms. Elowitz has more than 10 years of experience in the field of Holocaust and diversity education in Minnesota and Tennessee. Elowitz began her career at the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies in 1997 as an intern and graduate student under the tutelage of former director Dr. Stephen Feinstein.

            After completing her Master of Liberal Studies degree, which she designed to have an emphasis on the Holocaust, she went on to work for the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas as the director of Holocaust education. While at the JCRC, Elowitz oversaw numerous educational and community programs, and designed resources, study guides and curriculum for secondary educators. She also taught seminars and workshops to educate teachers and students about such topics as the Holocaust, anti-Semitism, anti-bullying, civil rights and race as seen through American popular culture.
            In 2008 Ms. Elowitz accepted the position of executive director for the Tennessee Holocaust Commission. She brought her talents as an administrator by leading the staff and board through a major rebranding and strategic planning process, while laying the foundation for the commission's continued sustainability and growth.
            "We are very fortunate to have someone of Jodi's talents and background working at the center," said Bruno Chaouat, director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. "Not only does she bring tremendous energy and passion to us, [but] she also has a unique history and relationship with CHGS, the university and the community."
            Elowitz received her Bachelor of Arts degree in humanities and her Master Liberal Studies degree at the University of Minnesota.
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          • "It's a Woman's World" airs

            Dr. Ellen Kennedy and Sabina Zimering, Holocaust survivor, appear in the episode "It's a Woman's World". The episode is scheduled to air on February 8th at 9:30 am and 4:30 pm on Metro Cable Network, Channel 6. It will also air on SPNN Channel 15 on February 5th and 12th at 6:30 pm.

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          • The Ritchie Boys

            Thank you for all that attended our Ritchie Boys event on November 12th at the MN History Center.

            To listen to the MPR interview with Dr. Guy Stern and Walter Schwarz click here.

            The Film "The Ritchie Boys" can be purchased here from Amazon.com or here from Barnes and Noble.

            Dr. Guy Stern referenced additional information that we would be posting to our website. This information can be found here.

            You can see photos from the Nov. 12th event and Dr. Stern's visit here.

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          • Dr. Ellen Kennedy received the "Outstanding Citizen" award from the Anne Frank foundation

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbCuDvDYoqo


            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbCuDvDYoqo
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          • CHGS in the News



            Dr. Ellen Kennedy in the MN Daily.
            http://www.mndaily.com/2009/08/04/university-director-raises-awareness-genocides
            "Holocaust Survivors Share Stories About Their Experiences" - Fox News
            http://www.keyc.tv/node/20174
            Minnesota Takes a Stand Against Genocide - Dec. 3, 2008
            Exhibit Held in Memory of Late 'U' Holocaust Expert - Sept. 15, 2008

            Visiting sites of tragedy to touch history, ease grief
            - Feb. 25, 2008
            Science Museum exhibit explores how Nazi eugenics effort lead to the Holocaust - Feb. 23, 2008
            Exhibit tracks history of Hitler's purification philosophy - Feb. 22, 2008
            Auschwitz Jewelry Exhibit Shows Secret Treasures With a Grisly Past - Jan. 23, 2008
            Two camps tug at issue of Armenian genocide - Nov. 14, 2007
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          • Visual History Archive Subscription

            The University of Minnesota Libraries have become subscribers to the Visual History Archive developed by the USC Shoah Foundation institute for Visual History and Education.

            This is sometimes referred to as the "Shoah Project," or "Survivors of the Shoah" Project, or the "Spielberg Project," as the interviews with 52,000 survivors were conducted with profits from the film, "Schindler's List."
            All 52,000 interviews are available from campus based computers, especially in the Wilson Library. There is a remarkable search engine that can pinpoint issues and items exactly where they are talked about on video tapes. While some tapes are archived locally, most must be ordered and it takes about 24-36 hours for them to be received online from University of Southern California.
            Visit the Visual History Archive website for more information.
            Contact:
            Susan Gangl
            Librarian for philosophy, religion, and Jewish studies
            180 Wilson Library
            University of Minnesota
            Phone: 612 626-2281
            E-mail: s-gang@umn.edu
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