University of Minnesota
Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies
chgs@umn.edu
612-624-0256


CHGS

Center News

  • THIS WEEK! Wednesday - Panel on the Politics of Mass Grave Exhumations and Human Rights

    Wednesday, November 16, 5:00 PM, 1210 Heller Hall

    “Necropolitics: Mass Graves and Exhumations in the Age of Human Rights” 

    Panel with FRANCISCO FERRÁNDIZ, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), ANTONIUS ROBBEN, University of Utrecht, and LINDSEY THOMAS, ‎Assistant Medical Examiner for Hennepin County;  moderated by UMN faculty LISA HILBINK, Political Science. 

    The panel will address the political and legal ramifications associated with exhumations of mass graves, and the process of compiling forensic evidence to aid in the investigation of suspicious deaths. The panel will reference the newly revised "The Minnesota Protocol" on extrajudicial killings, and two recent publications on related topics: Necropolitics, edited by Ferrandiz and Robben, which examines the complex social, political and psychological dimensions surrounding mass graves left by war and acts of terror in a variety of local contexts (Bosnia, Argentina, Spain, Korea, Rwanda among other countries) and Legacies of Violence in Contemporary Spain: Exhuming the Past, Understanding the Present, the recent book edited by L. Hilbink and O. Ferran.

    Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program. Made possible by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.
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  • NOW ON VIEW | "Displaced: Photos and Remembrances of Maxine Rude: 1945-1946"

    Displaced: Photos and Remembrances of Maxine Rude: 1945-1946

    Exhibition now on view!
    Eiger-Zaidenweber Holocaust Resource Center, Sabes Jewish Community Center 
    4330 Cedar Lake Rd S, Minneapolis, MN 55416


    Maxine Rude was a photographer for the United States Army and the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA), an organization formed to help the approximately 21million people displaced throughout Europe following World War Two.

    Photography can be a crucial component to news items, providing a visual narrative that has a life and power independent from written journalism. Over time, such photos can become icons, being the primary way people think about and imagine historic events. Photojournalism is therefore potentially quite powerful, shaping our understanding of history and the world.

    In the exhibit CHGS Director Alejandro Baer reflects on displaced persons in current contexts: "Comparisons to the Holocaust and the events that led to it have become commonplace when examining current events. The recent refugee crisis raises a range of comparisons between historical opinions about Jewish refugees before the Holocaust and opinions about contemporary refugees in America."

    Please visit the exhibit during open hours of the Sabes JCC.  Ask at the security desk for help in locating and accessing the exhibition space on the second floor of the JCC. 
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  • Course Offering for Spring 2017! GLOS 3900 (section 003) Topics in Global Studies: "Holocaust Art: History and Commemoration"

    GLOS 3900 - 003 Topics in Global Studies

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  • CHGS Fall 2016 Event & Program Calendar

    Wednesday-Friday, September 21-23
    “Local Action in Response to Migration” third annual international conference
    Room 101, Walter Library
    Organized by the Human Rights Program, the Local Action in Response to Migration Network, and Hispanic Issues Online; cosponsored by The Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair, Institute for Global Studies, Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, Department of Chicano & Latino Studies, Department of Spanish & Portuguese Studies, Immigration History Research Center, Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change.


    Thursday, September 29, 12:00 PM & 4:00 PM 
    “Displaced: Photos and Remembrances of Maxine Rude, 1945-1946” exhibit tours (12-4pm) and opening reception (4pm)
    Sabes Jewish Community Center, St. Louis Park
    With support from the Sabes Jewish Community Center.

    Thursday-Friday, September 29-30 
    “State and Society in Late Imperial Austria: A Symposium in Honor of Gary Cohen”
    1210 Heller Hall 
    Organized by the Center for Austrian Studies; cosponsored by the Institute for Global Studies, the Center Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Center for German and European Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and the Department of German, Scandinavian, and Dutch.

    Wednesday, October 26, 4:00 PM
    “Can the Story Be Told? History, Memory and Fiction in the Representation of Extreme Violence in Latin America” lecture by CARLOS PABÓN, University of Puerto Rico
    710 Social Sciences
    Cosponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Department of History.


    Wednesday, November 2, 7:00 PM
    “Reflections on the Unspoken” event featuring UMN faculty REBECCA KRINKE and LESLIE MORRIS reading from her memoir on her family’s Holocaust history, with vocalist RYLAND ANGEL
    Weisman Museum of Art, Davis Gallery
    Organized by the Weisman Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition
    The Talking Cure; cosponsored by the Center for Jewish Studies, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Department of Art History, Department of German, Scandinavian and Dutch, and the Institute for Advanced Study.

    Monday-Tuesday, November 14-15
    “Futures, Challenges and Transformations for Transitional Justice” workshop with CHGS talk by SIDNEY BLANCO, Chief Justice of the Constitutional Chamber of the Supreme Court of El Salvador
    University of Minnesota Law School
    Organized by the Transitional Justice Institute (Belfast), and UMN Human Rights Center and Human Rights Program; cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair, and Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.


    Wednesday, November 16, 5:00 PM
    “Necropolitics: Mass Graves and Exhumations in the Age of Human Rights” panel with FRANCISCO FERRÁNDIZ, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), ANTONIUS ROBBEN, University of Utrecht, and and LINDSEY THOMAS, ‎Assistant Medical Examiner for Hennepin County; moderated by UMN faculty LISA HILBINK, Political Science.
    1210 Heller Hall
    Made possible by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.



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  • Art, Music, and Scholarship: "Reflections on the Unspoken"


    Wednesday, November 2

    7:00 PM 
    Weisman Museum of Art, Davis Gallery

    “Reflections on the Unspoken”

    Presented in conjunction with the Weisman Art Museum’s exhibition The Talking Cure, “Unspoken” is an experimental, interdisciplinary event that brings together scholar Leslie Morris, renowned countertenor Ryland Angel, and visual artist Rebecca Krinke. Attendees will hear excerpts of Morris’ hybrid memoir “She Did Not Speak,” which reflects on the elusive links between her unexplained coma and her family's buried Holocaust history, hear the world-premiere performance of Angel’s libretto composition inspired by Morris’ work, and be invited to contribute to Krinke’s participatory art installation, "What Needs to Be Said?"

    Register at z.umn.edu/UNSPOKEN


    Organized by the Weisman Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition The Talking Cure, in partnership with the Center for Jewish Studies, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Department of German, Scandinavian and Dutch, and the Institute for Advanced Study.  

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  • Lecture on History, Memory and Fiction in the Representation of Extreme Violence in Latin America

    Wednesday, October 26, 4:00 PM
    “Can the Story Be Told? History, Memory and Fiction in the Representation of Extreme Violence in Latin America” 
    Lecture by CARLOS PABÓN, University of Puerto Rico
    710 Social Sciences
    Cosponsored by the Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese and the Dept. of History. 

    Prof. Pabón will reflect on the relation between history, memory and fiction in the representations of traumatic pasts, with particular focus on the debates in Latin America. He will address the often contested politics of memory and the uses of forgetfulness with respect to events of massive political violence in cases such as Argentina and Chile; and the relation of these politics with historical writing and other modes of representation, such as witness testimony.

    What aspects of a traumatic or catastrophic event must be remembered and how must we remember? What are the aesthetical, ethical and political implications of the narratives or representations of traumatic events of recent pasts? What are the limits of these representations?




    Carlos Pabón is professor of History at the University of Puerto Rico. He is the author of the books Nación postmortem. Ensayos sobre los tiempos de insoportable ambigüedad (San Juan, Ediciones Callejón, 2002); Polémicas. Política, intelectuales, violencia (San Juan, Ediciones Callejón, 2014); and Mínima política: textos breves y fragmentos sobre la crisis contemporánea (San Juan, Ediciones La Secta de los Perros, 2015). He is editor of the collection of essays titled El pasado ya no es lo que era. La historia en tiempos de incertidumbre (San Juan, Ediciones Vértigo, 2005); and has published a great number of articles and essays on nationalism, globalization, intellectuals, historiography and memory. 

    At present he is working on a book on the ethical and political implications of the representations of genocide and other forms extreme violence in the Twentieth Century; and the problem of history and memory of traumatic events in Latin America.
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  • October 7 HGMV: "Nostalgia as an Analytical Tool Applied to Turkey" presentation by Yagmur Karakaya

    Thursday, October 6, 4:00pm
    710 Social Sciences
    Yagmur Karakaya: "Nostalgia as an Analytical Tool Applied to Turkey"

    Yagmur is a PhD student at UMN Sociology department. She is interested in sociology of culture, collective memory and popular media analysis. Her dissertation is on Ottoman nostalgia in contemporary Turkey, which engages with this phenomenon in two levels: state (neo-Ottomanism) and popular (Ottomania), questioning the different ways in which these two domains interpret and use the Ottoman past. Currently she is also working on a comparative paper on collective memory of Holocaust in Turkey and Spain with Alejandro Baer.
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  • Spring 2017 Symposium on Comparative Genocide Studies

    Thursday-Saturday, April 6-8, 2017
    “Comparative Genocide Studies and the Holocaust: Conflicting Perspectives” international symposium


    The symposium will address the particular place of Holocaust scholarship and commemoration in the U.S. and Western Europe, against the background of a new generation of historians, social scientists, and other scholars dedicated to the empirical study of mass violence in a variety of cases across the globe. The symposium will foster and intellectual space for productive dialogue between scholars and educators in the fields of Holocaust and Genocide studies.

    Keynote Address will be the 2017 Ohanessian Lecture by Timothy Snyder. 

    Thursday, April 6, evening event
    TIMOTHY SNYDER, Yale University
    “The Holocaust as History and Warning”

    Organized by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair

    Friday-Saturday, April 7-8 Symposium Sessions to include a special session for educators, with the following confirmed speakers: 

    Alejandro Baer - Sociology, UMN
    Hollie Nyseth Brehm - Sociology, Ohio State University
    Irit Dekel - Sociology, Bard College, Berlin
    Wolf Gruner - University of Southern California, and Director of the USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research
    Elke Gryglewski - House of the Wannsee Conference, Berlin
    Joachim Savelsberg - Sociology, UMN
    Phillip Spencer - History, Kingston University
    Eric Weitz - History, The City College of New York
    Andrew Woolford - U. Manitoba, current president of IAGS
    Laura Zelle - Tolerance Minnesota, Smithsonian


    Symposium co-organized with the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair; made possible by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.
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  • HGMV talk: "Beyond Traumatic Memory: ‘Lost Treasures’ of Russian Politics" by UMN professor Catherine Guisan

    Thursday, October 20, 4:00 PM
    710 Social Sciences
    Professor CATHERINE GUISAN, Department of Political Science (UMN)
    “Beyond Traumatic Memory: ‘Lost Treasures’ of Russian Politics”

    Scholars disagree whether the Russian people have adequately faced up to the traumas of their Soviet past. There is relatively little literature on transitional justice whereas official references to the past legitimize the turn to authoritarianism in 21 st century Russia. Yet this article retrieves some ‘lost treasures’ (Hannah Arendt’s concept) of civic engagement from Russian and Soviet history. This matters intellectually and politically because it roots Russian democratization in an alternative national tradition, which is somewhat forgotten even by Russian democratic activists and scholars. The empirical data comes from interviews and ethnographic observations, and studies on trauma, transitional justice and Russian/Soviet politics.

    Catherine Guisan is the author of two books, A Political Theory of Identity in European Integration, Oxford (Routledge, 2011); and Un sens à l’Europe: Gagner la paix (1950-2003) (Odile Jacob, 2003); and numerous articles. Her research interests focus on Democratic Theory; European Integration Politics; Transnational Ethics; and Citizens’ Participation in International Relations. She is Visiting Assistant Professor and has taught at the University of Minnesota since 2001.
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  • “State and Society in Late Imperial Austria: A Symposium in Honor of Gary Cohen”


    Thursday-Friday, September 29-30
    “State and Society in Late Imperial Austria: A Symposium in Honor of Gary Cohen”
    1210 Heller Hall

    In honor of Gary Cohen's retirement the Center for Austrian Studies will host "State and Society in Late Imperial Vienna," bringing to campus leading historians of Habsburg Europe to examine questions central to Cohen's career.
    Program details available here 


    Organized by the Center for Austrian Studies; cosponsored by the Institute for Global Studies, the Center Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Center for German and European Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and the Department of German, Scandinavian, and Dutch.
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  • International Conference on Migration

    Wednesday-Friday, September 21-23
    “Local Action in Response to Migration” 
    Third annual international conference 

    This conference will share the experiences arising from local action with regard to migration. It will support the examination of key efforts in response to migration and migrants in the framework of the most recent challenges to the dynamics in the movement of peoples that unite Mesoamerica and North America as well as their transnational effects.



    KEYNOTE ADDRESS
    Wednesday, September 21, 7:00pm
    McNamara Alumni Center, A.I. Johnson Great Room
    Jill Anderson, “Los Otros Dreamers”

    A bilingual community­ published anthology of stories and photos about the experience of return and deportation to Mexico after having grown up in the United States. Twenty­six youth shared their stories in their own words with Jill Anderson, who then edited their contributions into a collective testimonial. In word and image, the book tells a story of the challenges, obstacles, injustices, triumphs, and potential of this bilingual, bicultural generation on the move. It is a combination of art, research and social justice written for a growing bilingual, bicultural audience.


    CONFERENCE
    Thursday, September 22, 10:00am - 9:00pm
    Friday, September 23, 9:00am - 3:30pm
    Walter Library, Room #101

    See full schedule here


    Organized by the Human Rights Program, the Local Action in Response to Migration Network, and Hispanic Issues Online; cosponsored by The Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair, Institute for Global Studies, Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, Department of Chicano & Latino Studies, Department of Spanish & Portuguese Studies, Immigration History Research Center, Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change.
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  • Genocide Education Outreach from CHGS


    CHGS works with a number of graduate students who teach and research genocide from a variety of fields of study. We are connecting these emerging scholars with schools, community colleges, and community organizations that are seeking guest educators through our new initiative: 

    GEO (Genocide Education Outreach)

    MA graduate Joe Eggers visits a group of high school students

    Participating graduate students are able to bring their academic research to a wide audience, providing specific resources and relevant, accessible, and positive learning experiences to students outside of the university.

    Brief list of topics for consideration for Fall and Spring 2016-2017:
    • What is a genocide? - Legal definition of genocide, and its challenges 
      • The practical and political use, or avoidance of, the concept of genocide
    • Genocide of Native Americans/First Nations/Indigenous Peoples 
      • Cultural genocide/physical genocide, Collective memory
    • Rwandan genocide 
      • Governmental policy, Gender issues, Memorialization 
    • Holocaust in Western Europe
    • Transatlantic slavery, especially regarding Haiti
    • Armenian genocide and modern Turkey
      • Public commemoration, politics of commemoration, and museums
    • Foreign policy regarding genocide/ethnic cleansing
    • Colombia
      • Peace building and reintegration
    • Guatemala
    • Cambodia, genocide, and the Cold War
    • Memorialization of genocide
    • Adoption policies with respect to genocide/cultural genocide
    • Nationalism and commemoration (including modern Spain)
    • Genocide in the Middle East (including Coptic Christians and contemporary Egypt)
    • Holocaust Art
      • CHGS' art pieces available for exhibition
      • Visit our collection of Holocaust-related artifacts available on campus

    Bring a graduate student to your class or community group! Or bring your class to CHGS to visit the library, learn from our graduate students, and see our artifact collection.

    This program is completely free!

    Please contact Demetrios Vital, CHGS Outreach Coordinator, for questions and information.


    A high school class visits the CHGS Library and artifact collection

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  • Summer Educator Workshop, June 20-23, 2016 -- Teaching about Genocide in Africa: Rwanda and Darfur

    June 20-23, 2016
    African Studies Initiative (ASI) Summer Educator Workshop
    "Teaching about Genocide in Africa: Rwanda and Darfur"
    sponsored by the Title VI grant


    CHGS was pleased to attend and help support this week-long seminar, sponsored by the African Studies Initiative Title VI grant. This institute was co-led by Wahutu Siguru, PhD Candidate in Sociology and former CHGS Badzin Fellow, and Nancy Ziemer, high school teacher, and developed out of last summer's "Holocaust in a Global Context" institute and the subsequent curriculum development project, which Ziemer helped lead. Taking this curriculum as a foundation, the institute took a comparative approach to the genocides in Rwanda and Darfur. 

    Participants gained content knowledge about the origin and legal ramifications of the term "genocide," and how various groups, such as the United Nations and the media, have addressed the two genocides. Each session included engaging activities that can be used in secondary and post-secondary classrooms. By the end of the seminar, participants gained a collection of materials for their classrooms, including resources, teaching methods, and teaching units.









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  • Recent CHGS exhibition at Wilson Library

    Displaced: The Semiotics of Identity 
    Special exhibit on display from April 27 through May 13, 2016

    "Syriana," Melissa Boric
    Untitled, from "Silence is Golden," Bette Mittelman
    "Herbert Fantle," Felix de la Concha
    Displaced: The Semiotics of Identity is an on-site installation and digital exhibition that invites contemplation on issues of displacement, survival, and identity. Displacement is a deeply personal experience, and yet one that is implicitly collective.

    The curators are students from the semester-long Department of Art workshop "Be the Curator: Curatorial Theory and Practice." Local art educators, curators, and artists helped guide the process of making a relevant and meaningful exhibition, which involved intensive group exploration of the value of artistic expression, how to establish a scope of artworks and objects that is inclusive and exclusive, and design an exhibition that is educational and engaging. 

    Co-sponsored by the University Libraries, the Center for Holocaust And Genocide Studies, and the Department of Art.
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  • Performance of the Musical Drama Broucci (Fireflies), based on the Czech folktale performed at the Terezin / WWII Jewish camp-ghetto of Theresienstadt




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  • Holocaust Memorial Day event at CHGS in conjunction with HGMV


    Thursday, May 5, 4:00 PM
    710 Social Sciences Building
    *Holocaust Memorial Day*
    SIDI N'DIAYE, Research Fellow, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    The Role of Historical Hate Representations in the Murder of Neighbors in Rwanda (1994) and Poland (World War II)


    An examination of the place of historical and hatred representations in the murders of Jewish neighbors during the Second World War in Poland and of Tutsi neighbors, during the 1994 genocide. Through the analysis of these proximity massacres, two forms of extreme violence will be discussed in comparing the pitches and the conscious and unconscious psychological and theoretical justifications. 




    Dr. Sidi N’Diaye is a postdoctoral researcher at the Institut des Sciences sociales du Politique (ISP) at the Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense (France.) He received his PhD in Political Science from the Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense in 2012. A native speaker of Soninke, Dr. Sidi N’Diaye possess language skills in French, English, Arabic, Wolof, and Pulaar. While in residence at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, Dr. N’Diaye will work on his project, “Historical and Mental Representations in the Proximity of Massacres: A Comparative Approach of the Genocide of Tutsis from Rwanda and Jews from Poland through Murders of Neighbors.”

    Dr. N’Diaye has published two books: The Violent Past and the Policy of Repentance in Mauritania, 1989-2012 (LGDJ, 2013), and Dissonances, Melodies and Social Policies in Mauritania: Random Discussions and Free Fragments, co-authored with Abdarahmane Ngaidé (L'Harmattan, 2014). He expects to finish his next monograph project by the end of May 2016.


    Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, cosponsored by the African Studies Initiative and the Human Rights Program, held in conjunction with the Holocaust, Genocide, and Mass Violence (HGMV) interdisciplinary graduate student group.
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  • HGMV Student Funding Opportunities

    We are pleased to offer HGMV graduate students funding support for travel to present their research at academic conferences, which includes an exciting new partnership with the UMN Libraries: 

    CHGS / HRP travel awards funded by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Human Rights Program
      Library Archives travel awards: the Kautz Family YMCA Archives HGMV Graduate Award, and the IHRC Archives HGMV Graduate Award
        Funding for both types of awards will be provided to graduate students in the form of reimbursement for travel costs and registration fees for conferences, symposia, workshops, and meetings where they will present their work.

        Topics must be relevant to the Holocaust, genocide, mass violence and other systemic human rights violations. Applications accepted on a rolling basis, first consideration will be given to those students who have presented or are scheduled to present their work in the HGMV workshop.  

        Library awards require prior consultation with an archivist, and incorporation of archive research in the paper.  Archivists are always available for consult via ihrca@umn.edu and ymcaarch@umn.edu.

        Requirements
          - Brief cover letter (directed to CHGS / HRP)
          - Date and title of conference / symposium / workshop / meeting
          - Title of presentation and abstract presentation (500 words)
          - Funds required (up to $500 US )
          - Date and title of HGMV Workshop presentation
          - Date of consultation with archivist and collection(s) utilized (for Library Archives award)
          - Other funding secured or being sought for travel, through UMN or elsewhere
          - Appropriately and accurately cite Archives collections in future presentations / papers (for Library Archives award)

          Email materials to jhammer@umn.edu and hamm0229@umn.edu.
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        • April 21 Holocaust, Genocide, and Mass Violence (HGMV) research group meeting

          Thursday, April 21, 4:00 PM 710 Social Sciences
          MARÍA JOSÉ MÉNDEZ GUTIÉRREZ, Department of Political Science
          “The soundtrack of war: ‘Narcocorridos’ and drug war violence in Latin America”


           


          Due to the widespread impact of the drug wars in Mexico and Central America, the violence that afflicts the region increasingly marks cultural products. Narcocorrido music lives and sings the complexities and contradictions of violence in Mesoamerica. In some ways, drug trafficking has become the political unconscious that increasingly defines Latin American art production. Adopting a storytelling folk song style, which once chronicled stories about revolutionary figures and soldiers who fought against the U.S. invasion of Mexico, narcocorridos tell stories of the drug war since the 1970s.
          As a musical newspaper that adds social texture to the drug trade and its violence, it reverberates as an important counter-narrative of the drug war. The colorful stories sung by narcocorridos specially stand out against the backdrop of a declining investigative journalism in countries like Mexico, where the menace of death has led many journalists to become accountants: “reporting the numbers of dead people, counting the bodies, without delivering the story behind the casualties (2).” While accused of glamorizing the opulent lives of drug traffickers and their use of violence and while banned from radio and public performances in some Mexican states, narcocorridos are becoming increasingly popular across Latin America and the United States. They currently top the Latin music charts and dominate radio playlists in many cities in the US and in Latin America, especially in Mexico and Central America. This presentation explores narcocorrido music and its widespread reception to make sense of the complexities of drug-related violence.

          María José Méndez is in the PhD program in Political Science at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests include postcolonial approaches to the questions of indigeneity and sovereignty as well as theorizations on contemporary global capitalism and the resistance to its effects. Her dissertation explores the politics of death and the political economy of the drug wars in Latin America, with particular attention to the multiple ways in which subaltern groups contest and navigate the evolving landscape of massacres and narco-capitalist accumulation. Her presentation this Thursday is entitled: "The Soundtrack of War: Narcocorridos and Drug War Violence in Latin America."
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        • Holocaust Survivors, their Children, and the Rise of Holocaust Consciousness

          Wednesday, April 20, 6:30PM
          1210 Heller Hall
          ARLENE STEIN, Rutgers University 

          "Reluctant Witnesses: Survivors, Their Children, and the Rise of Holocaust Consciousness"

          Talk to be followed by a reception and book signing; copies of Reluctant Witnesses will be available for sale at the event. 

          Space is limited! If you plan to join us, please Register Here.



          Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, made possible by the generosity of individual supporters, cosponsored by the Children of Holocaust Survivors Association in Minnesota (CHAIM), and the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas (JCRC).



          Today, the Holocaust is widely recognized as a universal moral touchstone. In Reluctant Witnesses, sociologist Arlene Stein--herself the daughter of a Holocaust survivor--mixes memoir, history, and sociological analysis to tell the story of the rise of Holocaust consciousness in the United States from the perspective of survivors and their descendants. If survivors tended to see Holocaust storytelling as mainly a private affair, their children--who reached adulthood during the heyday of identity politics--reclaimed their hidden family histories and transformed them into public stories.

          Arlene Stein, Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University, studies gender, sexuality, and American culture. The author of four books, she received the Simon and Gagnon Award for career contributions to the study of sexualities and the Ruth Benedict Book Award. She teaches courses on the sociology of gender and sexuality, culture, self and society, and trauma/memory, among other subjects, and serves on the graduate faculty of the Department of Women's and Gender Studies. Her latest book, Reluctant Witnesses: Survivors, Descendants, and the Rise of Holocaust Consciousness (Oxford, 2014), looks at how mass traumatic events shape the families of survivors, how they tell stories about these events, and how their stories enter the public sphere.

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        • Autism under the Nazis

          Tuesday, April 19, 4:00PM
          1210 Heller Hall
          EDITH SHEFFER, Stanford University
          'No Soul': Hans Asperger and the Nazi Origins of Autism

           
          Sponsored by the Center for Austrian Studies, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and the Center for German and European Studies.


          This talk examines Hans Asperger's development of the autism diagnosis Nazi Vienna, uncovering his intellectual and professional networks in Nazi psychiatry and his involvement in the Nazi euthanasia program that murdered disabled children.

          Edith Sheffer is an Assistant Professor of Modern European History at Stanford University. She was an Andrew W. Mellon postdoctoral fellow at Stanford before joining the faculty, and received her PhD from the University of California at Berkeley. Sheffer's first book, Burned Bridge: How East and West Germans Made the Iron Curtain (Oxford University Press, 2011) examined how the physical barrier between East and West Germany was not simply imposed by communism but was created by both east and west, as well as by the actions of ordinary people who lived along it. Burned Bridge is the recipient of three prizes, including the American Historical Association's Paul Birdsal Prize. Sheffer's has two current book projects: on the history of Hans Asperger's research on autism in Nazi Vienna and the role of Switzerland during World War Two.
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        • 2016 Ohanessian Lecture by PETER BALAKIAN: "The Armenian Genocide and Cultural Destruction"


          Thursday, April 14, 7:00PM (University Hall, McNamara Alumni Center)
           
          *2016 Ohanessian Lecture*
          PETER BALAKIAN, Colgate University
          The Armenian Genocide and Cultural Destruction
           Presented by the Ohanessian Chair, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

          Using an interdisciplinary, cultural studies approach, Balakian explores Raphael Lemkin’s often overlooked concept of cultural destruction in the case of the Armenian Genocide. Lemkin’s thinking was significantly shaped by the Armenian Genocide, as seen here in his newly published memoirs and other documents in the collection of his papers held at the American Jewish Archives. Balakian considers the Ottoman government’s vandalism and destruction of Armenian cultural monuments, the mass killing of Armenian intellectuals, torture using crucifixes, and forced conversion to Islam. In deepening the idea of culture and its relationship to genocide, he draws upon several models in the social sciences and humanities. The conclusion assesses the long-term impact of cultural destruction on Armenians in the diaspora and the Republic.

          More information here. Registration form here. Facebook event here.




          Peter Balakian is the Donald M. and Constance H. Rebar Professor of the Humanities, and Professor of English and Director of Creative Writing at Colgate University. He is the recipient of many awards and civic citations including a Movses Horenatis Medal from the Republic of Armenia, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, The Spendlove Prize for Social Justice, Tolerance, and Diplomacy and The Emily Clark Balch Prize for poetry from the Virginia Quarterly Review. He has appeared widely on national television and radio, and his work has been translated into a dozen languages and foreign editions. Professor Balakian is the author of seven books of poems, four books of prose and two translations. His newly published books are Ozone Journal and Vice and Shadow: Essays on the Lyric Imagination, Poetry, Art, and Culture (University of Chicago Press).
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        • HGMV Presentation: Remembering the Civil War in El Salvador: A Tale of Two Scorched Earth Operations

          Thursday, March 10, 4:00PM, 710 Social Sciences
          HGMV Workshop presentation by Paula Cuellar Cuellar, PhD graduate student, History Department, UMN

          "Remembering the Civil War in El Salvador: A Tale of Two Scorched Earth Operations"

          Drawing from history and law, my article assesses the question of international crimes in El Salvador. Specifically, my intention is to debate whether the scorched earth operations, conducted as part of a state policy during their civil wars, indeed constituted practices aimed to destroy the social fabric of whole disadvantaged groups within those countries. Whether those crimes constituted genocide, crimes against humanity, or war crimes should be discussed in order to further develop measures of truth, justice and reparations in those countries. To test my hypothesis, I will explore two scorched earth operations conducted in El Salvador: El Sumpul and Santa Cruz. In Guatemala scorched earth operations aimed at the Maya have been labeled as genocide by the Commission for Historical Clarification because they constituted an ethnic group.
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        • HGMV Presentation by HEIDER TUN: "Writing Human Rights from the Bottom Up: the Case of the Salvadoran Co-Madres (1977-1992)"

          Thursday, March 24, 4:00PM
          710 Social Sciences
          HEIDER TUN, Department of History, University of Minnesota
          Writing Human Rights from the Bottom Up: the Case of the Salvadoran Co-Madres (1977-1992)


          Street mural in San Salvador, El Salvador, Artist: Malu
          This presentation is part of a larger research project that focuses on the historical development of the human rights movement in Latin America and more specifically, in El Salvador. It will be proposed that three different groups in El Salvador—the state, the opposition and civil society—engaged human rights discourse during the Salvadoran Civil War (1980-1992) to develop and justify distinct agendas, and that these interactions shaped the development of the war. The ways the Salvadoran government and the guerrilla movement (FMLN) used the human rights rhetoric to hide, transform, maintain, and justify violence, while civilian organizations invoked this language to protect life and denounce impunity will be contrasted. The inclusion of the marginalized voices of organized Salvadoran civilian women will illustrate the limits and consequences of universal discourses such as human rights.

          Heider Tun is a PhD student in the history department of the University of Minnesota with support from the ICGC Mellon Foundation and DOVE fellowship programs. His research and recent publications focus on the historical development of Human Rights in Latin America. Since 2011 he has been working for a Human Rights Organization in El Salvador called Co-Madres where he actively works to preserve civil war archives, document women’s testimonies and promote human rights. In addition, Heider has done fieldwork in Mexico, El Salvador, and Peru and is interested in topics such as: memory, human rights, global change, colonial history, and popular culture. His interdisciplinary work seeks to bring the history of disadvantaged minority groups to academic discussions.
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        • Learning about Minnesota's connection to the Armenian Genocide: "Armenian Genocide Education and the Community" presentation and discussion with LOU ANN MATOSSIAN

          "Armenian Genocide Education and the Community"
          Presentation and Discussion with LOU ANN MATOSSIAN

          Wednesday, March 30, 6:00 - 7:30PM (light reception to follow)
          1210 Heller Hall 

          Presented by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies   

          By the fall of 1915, when the Ottoman Turkish extermination campaign was making headlines across Minnesota, the Armenian Genocide had been underway for six months. Closest to the story were two groups of Minnesotans: ethnic Armenians and Protestant missionaries.

          Using historical newspapers and other archival materials, an independent scholar shows how each group helped to shape Minnesota's response to the Armenian Genocide.


          Lou Ann Matossian
          A trusted advisor for Armenian-American philanthropy, Lou Ann Matossian has long been active in foundation grantmaking, research and writing, media and communications, issues advocacy, and Armenian community affairs. She served most recently as chief development officer of the Armenian Church of America, Eastern Diocese (New York). Earlier, she created and managed the grantmaking program of the Cafesjian Family Foundation (Minneapolis). 


          As eastern U.S. editor of the Armenian Reporter, Dr. Matossian was recognized at the National Ethnic Media Awards for international affairs reporting. She also shared a regional Emmy Award for a Twin Cities Public Television documentary about Minnesotans and the Armenian Genocide.

          Dr. Matossian's volunteer experience includes leadership roles in the Armenian Assembly of America, the Armenian Cultural Organization of Minnesota, the National Association for Armenian Studies and Research, and St. Sahag Armenian Church in St. Paul, Minnesota. An authority on the life and times of Minnesota Armenian author Bedros Keljik (1874-1959), Lou Ann Matossian resides in the Minneapolis-St. Paul Armenian community he founded.
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        • A Discussion about Minnesota's own Dark History

          Bdote Dakota Site Tour by Iyekiyapiwiƞ Darlene St. Clair
          Sunday, April 3

          Fort Snelling State Park

          Tour will run 2:00 - 3:30 PM
          Shuttle bus departs from UMN at 1:15 PM, returns by 4:00 PM
          Details will be provided upon confirmation of registration.
          Open to UMN students, staff, faculty, and alumni; community welcome to join if space is available.  Registration required.  Register here.

          We are living, learning, and working in a particular place with a long, fascinating, troubling, and frequently unknown story. One goal for this tour is that participants begin to experience the place we live in as Mnisota Makoce, the Dakota Homelands. We will be visiting several Dakota sacred sites located in an area that would later be called the Twin Cities.

          How has colonization impacted Dakota use and access to these places? How have Dakota people asserted a continuing relationship with these places? This tour will provide participants with a more nuanced and complicated understanding of the place we call home.
           
          Please be prepared for weather and walking.

          Iyekiyapiwiƞ Darlene St. Clair, Dakota Scholar and Professor, Saint Cloud State University
          St. Clair is Bdewakantuwan (Sacred Lake) Dakota from the Lower Sioux Reservation in Minnesota. Her research and teaching interests include American Indian arts and cultural expressions; American Indian education; oral ways of knowing and learning; the intersections of oppressions, particularly race and gender; and differing definitions and understandings of feminism in communities of color. 
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        • Spring 2016 CHGS Program

          Wednesday, February 3, 3:00 PM (325 Nicholson Hall)
          DANIEL SCHROETER, University of Minnesota
          On the Margins of the Holocaust: Jews and Muslims in the Colonial Maghreb During World War II
          Organized by the Center for Jewish Studies, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
           

          Thursday, February 18, 4:00 PM (710 Social Sciences Building)
          PEDRO CORREA, Research Fellow, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
          The Spanish Paradox: Spain as a Passive Accomplice and ‘Savior’ to the Holocaust
          Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

          Wednesday, February 24, 1:00-2:30 PM (**Room Change** Blegen 317)
          KEMAL PERVANIC, Film Producer
          Film Screening and Discussion on Pretty Village (68 min.): a film about a Bosnian village and what happens to a society torn apart by conflict
          Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
           

          Wednesday, March 9, 2:30-4:30 PM (120 Andersen Library)
          Antisemitism in Today's Europe: Between Neo-Nationalism and Global Terrorism
          KENNETH MARCUS, Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law 

          GÜNTHER JIKELI, Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism, Indiana University 
          BRUNO CHAOUAT, Department of French and Italian, University of Minnesota
          Moderated by PATRICIA LORCIN, Department of History, University of Minnesota
          Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Department of French and Italian, cosponsored by the Center for German and European Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies, and the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas 

          Friday, March 25, 6:30PM (140 Nolte Hall)
          Screening and discussion of award-winning filmmaker Marta Rodríguez’s documentary, Testigos de un Etnocidio: Memorias de Resistencia 
          Presented by the graduate student group from the Department of Spanish and Portuguese as part of the Graduate Linguistics and Literature Conference, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

          Wednesday, March 30, 6:00-7:30PM (1210 Heller Hall)
          Armenian Genocide Education and the Community
          LOU ANN MATOSSIAN
          Organized by the Ohanessian Chair, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies


          Sunday, April 3, 2:00PM (shuttle bus from campus to Fort Snelling State Park)
          IYEKIYAPEWIN DARLENE ST. CLAIR, St. Cloud State University
          Guided Tour of Bdote Dakota Site at Fort Snelling State Park
          Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies   

          Thursday, April 14, 7:00PM (University Hall, McNamara Alumni Center) 
          *2016 Ohanessian Lecture*
          PETER BALAKIAN, Colgate University
          The Armenian Genocide and Cultural Destruction
          Organized by the Ohanessian Chair, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies


          Tuesday, April 19, 4:00PM (1210 Heller Hall)
          EDITH SHEFFER, Stanford University
          Origins of Autism in the Third Reich

          Organized by the Center for Austrian Studies, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

          Wednesday, April 20, 6:30PM (1210 Heller Hall)
          ARLENE STEIN, Rutgers University
          Reluctant Witnesses: Survivors, Their Children, and the Rise of Holocaust Consciousness 
          Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, made possible by the generosity of individual supporters

          Wednesday, April 27 (Wilson Library)
          Exhibit Opening at Wilson Library: CHGS art and historical objects, curated by students
          Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies in conjunction with Deborah Boudewyns' "Workshop in Art" course on curatorial theory and practice (ARTS 1490/3490)

          Thursday, May 5, 4:00 PM, 710 Social Sciences Building

          *Holocaust Memorial Day*
          SIDI N'DIAYE,
          Research Fellow, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
          The Role of Historical Hate Representations in the Murder of Neighbors in Rwanda (1994) and Poland (World War II)
          Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, cosponsored by the African Studies Initiative and the Human Rights Program, held in conjunction with the Holocaust, Genocide, and Mass Violence (HGMV) interdisciplinary graduate student group


          Sunday, May 15, 3:00 PM, Sokol Czech Slovak Community Center 
          Performance of the Musical Drama Broucci (Fireflies), based on the Czech folktale and performed at the Terezin / WWII Jewish camp-ghetto of Theresienstadt
          Organized by Judith Brin Ingber, the Czech and Slovak School and Taneční Mládež, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Center for Austrian Studies


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        • HGMV Interdisciplinary Graduate Group Meeting

          Thursday, February 11, 4:00PM, 710 Social Sciences
          RITA KOMPELMAKHER, Department of Theater Arts and Dance
          “Staying Alive: Human Rights and the Performance of Life Support in Post-Soviet Belarusian Theater”



          Margarita (Rita) Kompelmakher is a PhD candidate in the Theater Arts and Dance Department at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. Her research focuses on the politics of the body and aesthetic production in relation to migration, globalization and rights discourse. Her dissertation investigates shifts in performance practice in post-Soviet Belarusian theater under the demands of human rights discourse and global capital. Her work is published in Xcp: Cross-Cultural Poetics Journal (Streetnotes), Captured by the City: Perspectives in Urban Culture Studies and the upcoming anthology Performing Freedom: Alternative Theater in Post-Communist Europe. She received a BFA from the Tisch School of Arts at NYU.
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        • UMN and Community Panel Event on Antisemitism in Today's Europe

          Wednesday, March 9, 2:30-4:30 PM
          120 Elmer L. Andersen Library

          Antisemitism in Today's Europe: Between Neo-Nationalism and Global Terrorism
           

          **Public Event**

          Panel speakers:
          KENNETH MARCUS, Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law 
          GÜNTHER JIKELI, Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism, Indiana University 
          ERIC P. SCHWARTZ, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota
          BRUNO CHAOUAT, Department of French and Italian, University of Minnesota
          Moderated by: 
          PATRICIA LORCIN, Department of History, University of Minnesota
           
          Political scientist Gilles Kepel, among other pundits and scholars, has argued that jihadism needs nationalism and nationalism needs jihadism. Both extremisms, in order to gain traction, must identify an enemy. If, for European Neo-Nationalisms, the Muslim/immigrant is the enemy, for jihadism it is the West, modernity, and the Jew.

          This panel will examine the new discourse of antisemitism in the context of a deadly dialectic between neo-nationalism and global terrorism, in a time when the Jewish population of Europe is caught in a vice between old European nationalist antisemitism and a belief in an apocalyptic transformation of society that also scapegoats Jews.  



          KENNETH MARCUS is President and General Counsel of the Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law and author of The Definition of Anti-Semitism (Oxford University Press: 2015) and Jewish Identity and Civil Rights in America (Cambridge University Press: 2010).  

          GÜNTHER JIKELI is a historian and sociologist of modern Europe at the Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism, Indiana University. He is the author ofEuropean Muslim Antisemitism(Indiana University Press: 2015) and current research projects include the impact of contemporary antisemitism in France and Germany, intergenerational transmissions of antisemitic beliefs, and perceptions of the Holocaust. 

          ERIC SCHWARTZ has served as dean of the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs since October 2011.Prior to that, Schwartz served as U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees, and Migration, having been nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in 2009, and is currently Vice Chair of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.

          BRUNO CHAOUAT is Professor of French and Jewish Studies and Chair of the Department of French and Italian at the University of Minnesota. His most recent book is Is Theory Good for the Jews: French Thought and the Challenge of the New Antisemitism(under contract with Liverpool University Press: forthcoming).

          PATRICIA LORCIN is Professor of History at the University of Minnesota and the author of Imperial Identities(1995 revised and updated 2014; French translation: 2005) among several other books that focus on race and racial ideology in France and its colonies, women and gender in European colonies, and modern France and French imperialism.


          Sponsored by the University of Minnesota's Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Center for German and European Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies, Department of French and Italian, Department of History, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, and the Human Rights Program; and by the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas.
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        • Feb 24 film screening and discussion on PRETTY VILLAGE: What happens to a society torn apart by conflict?

          Wednesday, February 24
          1:00-2:30 PM
          Blegen 317
          KEMAL PERVANIC, Film Producer
          Film Screening and discussion via Skype on PRETTY VILLAGE (68 min.): a film about a Bosnian village and what happens to a society torn apart by conflict

           

          Twenty years after the end of The Bosnian War, concentration camp survivor Kemal Pervanic returns to his village to find a community still at war with itself. When Kemal tracks down the school teacher who tortured him in the camps he is forced to ask if reconciliation can ever be possible while the perpetrators of terrible crimes are still free.



          Kemal Pervanic is a survivor of the notorious Omarska concentration camp, which was set up by Bosnian Serb forces in the early days of the Bosnian War. The camp, nominally an ‘investigation centre’, was uncovered by British journalists in 1992, leading to international outrage and condemnation. Kemal now lives in England, he is the founder of Most Mira charity and is the author of The Killing Days: My Journey Through the Bosnian War.

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        • Human Rights Awards -- applications now accepted with a deadline of February 26

          As a part of its commitment to recognizing the achievements of students in
          human rights and to offering new experiential learning opportunities, the
          Human Rights Program is pleased to announce its array of awards, financial
          support, and internships available for students in 2016. Whether students
          are seeking their Bachelor's, Master's, PhD, or professional degree, the
          Program is thrilled to be offering a number of ways in which to support
          their work in promoting and protecting human rights.



          - The Program, in conjunction with the University's Center for Holocaust
          and Genocide Studies and the Sullivan Ballou Fund, is once again
          recognizing *undergraduate students *doing tremendous work in human
          rights with the* Inna Meiman Human Rights Award* and the *Sullivan
          Ballou Award*. Faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to nominate
          students for these $1,000 awards. Self-nominations are also accepted. *March
          22, 2016 application deadline.*

          - Following a very successful 2015 collaboration, the Program is again
          partnering with the local non-profit Children of Incarcerated Caregivers in
          seeking*graduate/professional and upper-level undergraduate students* to
          serve on an *interdisciplinary research team* during summer 2016. The
          team will research the effects of parental incarceration and will advocate
          for effective policies and programs on this issue. Stipends of $5,500 for
          graduate/professional students and $4,000 for undergraduates are offered
          for this FT, two-month internship opportunity. *February 26,
          2016 application deadline.*

          - Last but not least, the Program is offering up to $4,000 of support to
          select *undergraduates* and *graduate/professional students pursuing the
          graduate minor in human rights* who will be completing a *human-rights-related
          internship* in the summer of 2016. *February 26, 2016 application
          deadline.*

          Much more information on each award/internship as well as information on
          how to apply is available on the Program's website
          <http://hrp.cla.umn.edu/events/allNews.php?entry=tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4403982677299879914.post-6848440456601849776>
          . You may also contact Rochelle Hammer in the Human Rights Program with
          questions related to these opportunities, hamm0229@umn.edu or 612-626-7947.
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        • HGMV sneak peek at forthcoming book by UMN faculty, "Legacies of Violence in Contemporary Spain: Exhuming the Past, Understanding the Present"

          Thursday, February 25
          4:00 PM
          710 Social Sciences Building
          Professors Ofelia Ferrán (Spanish and Portuguese) and Lisa Hilbink (Political Science):
          "Legacies of Violence in Contemporary Spain: Exhuming the Past, Understanding the Present"


          The book brings together perspectives from history, political science, literary and cultural studies, forensic and cultural anthropology, international human rights law, sociology, and art. It puts these diverse fields in dialogue with each other to analyze the multiple legacies of Francoist violence in contemporary Spain, with a special focus on the exhumations of mass graves from the Civil War and post-war era. In exploring the multifaceted nature of a society’s reckoning with past violence, the book speaks not only to those interested in contemporary Spain and Western Europe, but also to those studying issues of transitional and post-transitional justice in other national and regional contexts. In this presentation, Professors Ferrán and Hilbink will highlight three themes found across the various chapters: the hidden in plain sight/site nature of the legacies of Francoist violence; the classificatory limbo into which the Franco regime often falls due to its betwixt and between location in geopolitical time and space; and how Spanish society has begun to move away from the fear-driven “consensus” of the Transition era to a new, more democratic “contentious coexistence.” 
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        • CHGS Presents USHMM Research Fellow PEDRO CORREA speaking about the Spanish government's paradoxical politics and policies regarding Jews during WWII

          Thursday, February 18, 4:00 PM 
          710 Social Sciences Building
          PEDRO CORREA, Research Fellow, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
          The Spanish Paradox: Was Spain a Passive Accomplice or ‘Savior’ during the Holocaust?

          "The Spanish Paradox: Was Spain a Passive Accomplice or ‘Savior’ during the Holocaust," highlights the various links between Francoist Spain and the Holocaust, and assesses the role of the Spanish government in relation to the treatment of the Spanish Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe, as well as to the influx of Jewish refugees to Spain more broadly.


          Pedro Correa Martín-Arroyo is currently the Diane and Howard Fellow at the USHMM, and PhD candidate a the London School of Economics (LSE). His research interests gravitate around the role of the neutral countries during the Holocaust. In particular, his doctoral project addresses the international management of the Jewish refugee crisis in Spain and Portugal during World War II. 


          Mr. Correa has been guest lecturer at Royal Holloway, University of London; at the University of Minnesota, and at the American Association of Holocaust Organization's 2016 Winter Seminar. He has written a number of publications, including “The Politics of Holocaust Rescue Myths in Spain: from Francoist Legend to the Righteous Diplomats”, coauthored with Prof. Alejandro Baer and forthcoming in The Politics of the Neutrals during the Shoah(IHRA, 2016); “Franco, Savior of the Jews? Tracing the Genealogy of the Myth and Assessing its Persistence in recent Historiography”, forthcoming in Lessons and Legacies of the Holocaust XIII (Northwestern University, 2018); and “La España Franquista y el Mito de la Salvación de los Judíos durante el Holocausto, 1940-1945” [Francoist Spain and the Myth of the rescue during the Holocaust] in Ubi Sunt? Revista de Historia, No. 28 (2013). Mr. Correahas also been awarded a number of scholarships and distinctions, including the ‘La Caixa’ scholarship for Postgraduate Studies in Europe, the European Parliament-Prof. Bronisław Geremek European Civilisation Chair scholarship for history graduates, and the Best Master Thesis Award by the College of Europe for his dissertation Histoeuropeanisation: Challenges and Implications of rewriting the history of Europe ‘Europeanly’, 1989-2015 (Warsaw, 2013).
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        • March 11 application deadline for Trans-Atlantic Summer Institute (TASI) 2016 to be co-taught by Professor Bernt Schnettler and CHGS Director Alejandro Baer


          Trans-Atlantic Summer Institute (TASI) 2016
          Reframing Mass Violence in Europe and the Americas: The Holocaust & Global Memory Constellations

          June 12-19, 2016, Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany
           

          Graduate Student Fellowship Program
          Application deadline: Friday, March 11, 2016
          This Summer Institute’s objective is to explore the particular developments and transnational entanglements of memory discourses in societies revisiting their legacies of large-scale political violence. This entails processes of re-interpretation, renaming and reframing of a) the atrocities themselves and b) the (often questioned) transitional justice mechanisms that were adopted in their aftermaths. We place special emphasis on the analyses of practices, rituals and social events that help creating, supporting and disseminating social memories related to mass violence.

          For more information see the CGES website.


          Presented by the Center for German & European Studies at the University of Minnesota, which is funded by the University of Minnesota and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), in cooperation with Universität Bayreuth (Germany).
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        • Call for Applications: Deadline February 14

          UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM
          Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies
           

          CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

          New Directions in the Use of Oral Testimonies:
          Soviet Experiences of the Holocaust
           

          August 1-12, 2016
          Washington, D.C.


          The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum invites applications for a workshop focused on the use of testimony in the study of the Holocaust in the former Soviet Union, to be held from August 1-12, 2016 at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
           

          This workshop will bring together scholars whose work relies heavily upon oral and written testimonies of perpetrators, bystanders, and victims of the Holocaust on the territory of the former Soviet Union. Participants from North America and the states of the former Soviet Union will discuss research strategies and some of the central issues surrounding the use of testimonies in their work. Discussions will be prompted by pre-circulated synopses of participants’ research agendas, with a focus on their application of testimony to their wider projects. During the workshop, participants also will have the opportunity to engage with the many thousands of oral history testimonies available at the Museum, which include those of the USC Shoah Foundation and Yahad-In Unum. These records are but part of the Museum’s more than 210 million pages of archival material, which includes more than 15 million pages of microfilmed, digitized, and paper documents from the former Soviet Union. The program will culminate in a public presentation by the participants, in which they will discuss current issues and future directions in the use of testimony in research and in the teaching of the topic of the Holocaust in the former Soviet Union.
           

          In addition to scholars from North American institutions of higher education, the Museum welcomes applications from Ph.D. students and scholars at universities in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. Please note that we are accepting applications from these areas only. Applicants should articulate clearly how they use testimony in their research.
           

          Applications must be submitted in English and include: (1) an online application form; (2) a current curriculum vitae; and (3) a maximum 1000-word summary of the applicant’s current research topic. For details, see the application form available at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1jTKrCoycZir2R1yHhU0Cr9GhtOTtdJEoa-AojuF5-es/viewform.
           

          Application materials may be sent by email attachment to Dr. Daniel Newman, Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: danewman@ushmm.org. All application materials must be received by February 14, 2016. We will notify applicants regarding acceptance by March 1.
           

          Participants must be in attendance each day of the workshop. Workshop sessions will be conducted in English. Participants will be required to submit a research proposal of 8 to 10 pages in English for pre-circulation by June 30, 2016.
           

          Accepted applicants will receive (1) a stipend toward the cost of direct travel to and from each participant’s home institution and Washington, D.C.; (2) shared lodging for the workshop’s duration; and (3) a stipend toward the cost of meals, local transit, luggage surcharges, and other incidental expenses, which will be distributed after the workshop’s conclusion via international wire transfer. It is the sole responsibility of each participant to acquire the appropriate visa to enter the United States and to pay any costs associated with securing that visa.
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        • March 11 Deadline: Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies

          The University of Minnesota Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Department of History invite applications from current doctoral students in the UMN College of Liberal Arts for the Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies for the academic year 2015-16.

          The Badzin Fellowship will pay a stipend of $18,000, the cost of tuition and health insurance, and $1,000 toward the mandatory graduate student fees. All application materials must be received by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies electronically at chgs@umn.edu, no later than 3:00 pm on Friday, March 11, 2016.


          Eligibility:
          An applicant must be a full-time student in a Ph.D. program in the College of Liberal Arts, currently enrolled in the first, second, third, or fourth year of study, and have a doctoral dissertation project in Holocaust and/or genocide studies.
          The fellowship will be awarded on the basis of the quality and scholarly potential of the dissertation project, the applicant's quality of performance in the graduate program, and the applicant's general scholarly promise.
          The Badzin Fellowship is an exclusive award. It may not be held concurrently with another award or teaching responsibilities.
          Required application materials:
          1) A letter of application (maximum 4 pages single-spaced) describing the applicant's intellectual interests and dissertation research and the research and/or writing which the applicant expects to do during the fellowship year
          2) A current curriculum vitae for the applicant
          3) An unofficial transcript of all graduate work done at the University of Minnesota
          4) TWO confidential letters of recommendation from U of MN faculty, discussing the quality of the applicant's graduate work and dissertation project and the applicant's progress toward completing the degree, sent directly to the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
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        • HGMV Talk by Maria Hofmann (GSD) "Recent Genocide Documentaries between Return and Respite of Trauma"

          Wednesday, December 9, 4:00 PM 710 Social Sciences
          MARIA HOFMANN, German, Scandinavian & Dutch (UMN)
          "Recent Genocide Documentaries between Return and Respite of Trauma"

          Recent Genoc ide Documentar ies between Return and Respite of Trauma Documentary film has undergone a development in the past 15 years that complicates the notions of fact and fiction in this genre. These ostensibly binary opposites have been discussed extensively in the 1970s and 80s. The scholarly work of historian Hayden White and the contributions of Eva Hohenberger and others in regard to documentary film have revealed that any kind of narrativization of events (including in historiography and other non-fictional genres) is a form of mediation that employs similar strategies as fiction. This exposed the claim of an objective or true history as an unattainable ideal and an unmediated representation of reality as impossible. Despite these academic realizations, documentary filmmakers continue to treat their films as purely non-fictional, clearly delineating themselves and their work from fiction. One reason for this continuous adherence to a more traditional definition is the danger of relativization, of ultimately undermining any truth claim when the difference between fact and fiction is completely dismissed. 


          Recent documentary films, however, have started to embrace and welcome the similarities to fiction instead of forcefully denying their proximity. These films employ fictionalizations as their core strategy in order to address and reflect upon a media situation in which the medium itself has become precarious, and images have lost their immediate "evidentiary power" (Nichols). 



          This development shows itself most clearly in films that engage with the topic of genocide. In the case of the Holocaust for example, viewers are constantly exposed to an overabundance of images of Nazi atrocities. The initial shocking impact soon deteriorates to numbness and defensiveness. Susan Sontag warns of the effects of this excessive exposure and points out that, instead of helping us understand, these photographs haunt us: "The problem is not that people remember through photographs but that they remember only the photographs." (113) We have become Maria Hofmann used to these iconic pictures to a degree that strips them of their critical potential and prevents any further engagement. The overpowering effect of these images paradoxically leads to a detachment from historical facts. An illustrative example is the photograph of a young girl on the day of her deportation) that was shown and reproduced in books, news clips, documentaries, and other films, until her face became the embodiment of the genocide of the Jews. 

          Only in 1994 was her true identity as a Sinti girl, Settela Steinbach, discovered. Additionally, this case makes the documentary image even more problematic when we remember that that the only available footage comes from the perpetrators and can be staged or falsified. Filmmaker Harun Farocki addresses these issues in his documentary Respite. He uses only original footage from the Westerbork transit camp in the Netherlands and mediates it to a high degree. Instead of simply informing the viewer of the history Maria Hofmann surrounding Settela Steinbach's photograph, as a traditional documentary would, Respite tells us many possible stories, ultimately employing a counterstrategy consisting of a close reiterative reading of the material that simultaneously reveals the layers of mediated pictures connected to the images. This film, along with The Act of Killing (about the Indonesian killings of 1965-66 ) and The Missing Picture (focusing on the atrocities of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia) will be the main subjects of my inquiry as they represent prime examples for this new development in documentary film that contravenes non-fictional conventions and requires a framework beyond traditional dichotomies. The Act of Killing, as just one example, has been strongly criticized for making the perpetrators, who are still in power and have never been prosecuted for their crimes, the protagonists, letting them reenact important events. This political and moral controversy is based on a supposed access to an objective truth, and ultimately on a belief in the reductive and oversimplifying binary of fact and fiction. 

          This is why it is important to find an approach that can help avoid the impasse of this perspective and elevates the discussion by shifting the focus towards a concept of fictionalization as a strategy that aims to convey the cultural complexity of these events. 

          Hofmann received her MA in Comparative Literature from the University in Munich in 2013. Her MA thesis focused on the narratological concept of possible world theory and its application to film studies. She has been a PhD student in the Department for German, Scandinavian & Dutch since 2013. Research interests include narratology, theories of fictionality, documentary film and genocide studies. Her dissertation discusses a new development in documentary films about genocide, and explores how narratological methods can be applied to a this new development which intentionally blurs the boundaries between fact and fiction.
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        • Eye on Africa: Will we only care about Burundi if it is called a genocide?


          by Wahutu Siguru

          A few things have been happening in Burundi this year. The president, Pierre Nkuruzinza circumvented the constitution and ran for a third term. The result of this has been on-going conflict from April. Burundi was not a surprise though. Journalists I spoke to earlier this year all stated that regional coverage of Burundi had pointed to something being afoot as early as last year. None-the-less, here we are, with yet another unfolding atrocity, several deaths, an ever growing numbers of displaced and plenty of hand-wringing by the international community.

          There are reports of massive numbers of refugees already running to Rwanda in anticipation of violence at a massive scale. A Kenyan journalist I spoke to in March painted a really grim picture of politicians getting ready to cause havoc. These concerns have now been confirmed by reports emanating from Burundi. The police are engaging in a campaign of brutal suppression of protesters. Several dissenting voices have been thrown in jail accused with the ever nefarious charge of "endangering internal and external state security." Protesters have been charged, by the state prosecution, with the offence of "participation in an insurrectionary movement." Not to forget the continual assassinations and assassination attempts by both sides of this unfolding atrocity.

          Despite all of this though what is happening in Burundi is not genocide nor is Burundi going to be another Rwanda. Sometimes it feels as though every atrocity in Africa is often seen as the next Rwanda. This does not mean that the government in Burundi is not heinous nor is it in any way excusable. Indeed in May, the International Criminal Court saw it necessary to warn the Burundi’s leaders of possible prosecution should the court deem it necessary. While the word genocide is emotive and seen as necessary whenever world opinion needs to be influenced, it complicates the situation on the ground as well. In Burundi, this complication is been based on how to define the perpetrators and victims; if it’s a genocide, who is the targeted group and who exactly is the perpetrator of said genocide?



          There is also an implication (whenever we are quick to label a conflict genocide) that the international community only cares about genocide. Must atrocities in African countries be called genocide for the world to care?

          What is happening in Burundi is a power grab by a cabal of politicians who decided to go against the spirit of the Arusha peace agreement of 2000, which was meant to end years of civil conflict. This implies, therefore, that one way to solve it would be through a political process and dialogue. A process that should include targeted sanctions by the international community and a cessation of foreign aid. Another troubling issue has been the inertia by regional bodies, such as the African Union and the East African Community, both of which have been largely peripheral at best. The world needs to pay attention to Burundi, not because it could be the 'next Rwanda' or that there is a 'genocide' unfolding there. It needs to pay attention because what happens in Burundi and to Burundians also affects its neighboring countries. If there is anything we should know by now, it is that conflicts in this region have historically tended to spill over national boundaries with disastrous effects. Additionally, we should care because of our shared humanity, which is what binds us.
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        • Minneapolis Film Society Screens Pretty Village

          By Erma Nezirevic

          On Saturday, October 17th, 2015, the Minneapolis Film Society screened Pretty Village at St. Anthony Main theater, a documentary depicting the experience of Kemal Pevranic and his village during the war in Bosnia (1992-95). Pevranic, the main subject of the film, is also the producer and a human rights activist who works to raise awareness and to rebuild his community in Bosnia by working on reconciliation efforts, particularly with young people of all three ethnicities in Bosnia. The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies co-sponsored the film screening event, in which I participated as the moderator of the post-screening discussion.

          Pretty Village is a powerful documentary centered on Pevranic’s home village of Kevljani located in Northern Bosnia in the municipality of Prijedor. The Muslim village became a target during the war by the surrounding Serb villages. Most of the men in the village were either killed or taken into the nearby Omarska concentration camp. Labeled an “investigation center,” Omarska was only revealed as a concentration camp by the media after serious denial on the part of the Serb forces. In the film, we see Pevranic return to Omarska to face the horrific memories, as well as his torturer, who just so happened to have been his high school teacher. In the scene where Kemal directly asks the teacher about the camp, we see a kind of denial on the part of the perpetrator that just makes us cringe as we watch the hypocrisy in the interaction. It makes us wonder if facing one’s torturer cannot bring closure, what can? As one of the village residents and torture victim states in the film, hating one’s torturers can also become a kind of torture in itself, as it is exhausting to hate someone with such intensity.



          “Those who didn’t live through war don’t know anything,” says an elderly woman at the beginning of Pretty Village, making us think about what atrocity, fear, and trauma do to us. There is a kind of wisdom that comes from enduring and surviving war that is not comparable with other wisdom we have. At the very least, it makes us question where we belong. After being asked what home means to him now during the Q & A, Pevranic, educated in London after leaving Bosnia, says that his idea of home has changed. While Kevljani will never be the same again, he has rebuilt his home and has returned to live there. However, as those featured in his film mentioned, young people educated outside of Bosnia have no reason to return since they have lives away from their original home.

          Above all, this is a film that questions and collapses the dichotomies inherent in human relations, particularly when genocide takes place. It is no longer clear what is good and what is evil, who is a foreigner and who is at home, as a student and teacher relationship turns into that of the torturer and the tortured, arguably both equally as intimate. Ultimately, this film shows us just how quickly the status quo can change, and one has to change his definition of what normal life is when the circumstances suddenly change, and they can do so at any given moment.

          N.B.: For those who have not had the opportunity to see the film, CHGS is working to bring a screening to campus in Spring 2016.
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        • Interview with Sam Grey, Fulbright Scholar


          Written by Joe Eggers

          This year, the University of Minnesota will be hosting Sam Grey, a Fulbright Scholar from Canada. Sam comes to campus to continue her research in the field of reconciliation, specifically in settler-colonial states. While in Minnesota, Sam will be exploring the resistance to reconciliation in Minnesota a century and a half after the Dakota conflict of 1862.


          Coming from the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Sam is well suited to exploring Minnesota’s relationship with its indigenous communities. Her doctoral research focuses on political theory and comparative politics, primarily from a non-western political perspective. Sam’s research interests have included, in addition to indigenous rights, gender equality, food politics and solidarity politics.  As a Canadian scholar in Minnesota, Sam is in a unique position to compare Canada’s recently completed Truth and Reconciliation process with the United States’ own attempts to understand its own relationship with its indigenous population.


          For context, the CanadianTruth & Reconciliation Commission issued its final findings in June after seven years of examining the legacy of the country’s residential school programs. Unlike other Truth & Reconciliation Commissions, Canada’s held no legal power, which meant that it couldn’t offer amnesty for alleged perpetrators of abuse at the residential schools in exchange for testimony. The result was a commission that primarily focused on recording victim experiences.  Following the conclusion of hearings, the commission published an extensive report of its findings. The report outlined many of the challenges that indigenous people continue to face in Canada as a result of the residential schools and outlined a plan for reconciliation. Most famously, commissioner chair and Canadian Supreme Court Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin labelled the residential schoolsystem cultural genocide .




          When asked why Canada has been so forthcoming about its troubling history with indigenous people, Sam is honest. In her assessment, Canada’s relationship with its indigenous communities isn’t actually that positive, though it’s likely that it’s perceived as good when compared to the United States’ relationship its indigenous population. She says the Truth & Reconciliation commission and subsequent report are a positive step, but fall short of addressing many of the systemic issues in Canada. She points to several troubling incidents, including the current epidemic of missingindigenous women in central Canada that demonstrate the amount of work that needs to continue.


          When asked about Minnesota, the idea of local reconciliation seems especially difficult to Sam. There are a number of factors that she says make attempts at reconciliation challenging, including that the resentment amongst descendants of the Minnesota settlers who took part in the 1862 conflict and members of the Dakota community is still present. Memories of the conflict represent just one of the hurdles to reconciliation in Minnesota that Sam hopes to explore during her nine months here.


          Sam sees the issue of residential schools as the best approach for building a greater understanding of the legacy of colonialism in the United States and Canada. To her, and other scholars, boarding and residential schools represent "philanthropy gone off the rails," which makes the issue easier to understand and contextualize. As more people gain an understanding the schools as a place of abuse, Sam explains, scholars can build on that awareness to promote a greater understanding of the issues affecting indigenous people today.


          Much of Sam’s work can be found on her Academiawebpage.


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        • HGMV Workshop (September 30): JOE EGGERS "What’s in a Name? Exploring How We Define Genocide from Lemkin to International Law"



          WEDNESDAY, September 30
          4:00 PM
          JOE EGGERS, Graduate Student "What’s in a Name? Exploring How We Define Genocide from Lemkin to International Law"
          710 Social Sciences

          Joe Eggers
          In 1945, Raphael Lemkin published Axis Rule In Occupied Europe: Laws Of Occupation, Analysis Of Government, Proposals For Redress which contained the first published definition of the crime of genocide. Three years later, the newly formed United Nations passed the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide which largely stripped much of Lemkin’s original ideas of genocide. In the 70 years since the release of Axis Rule, scholars, legal experts and advocates have all attempted to remedy the differences between Lemkin’s broad definition of genocide against the narrower legal one.

          The aim of this paper is to answer the question: how has our concept of genocide evolved since Lemkin? First, the author analyzes different approaches to defining genocide, starting with Lemkin’s original theory, moving to international law and ending on contemporary scholarly definition. Next he compares the legal definition against Lemkin’s by analyzing the United States policy of forced assimilation of its own indigenous population beginning in the mid-nineteenth century. Specifically, he will examine the Native American boarding school system that existed well into the second half of the twentieth century. This research raises yet another important question: how do our perceptions of these crimes change when viewed through different ways of defining genocide? Finally, the author examines the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission which defined Canada’s boarding schools as genocide in a June 2015 statement and attempt to find approaches for the United States to begin understanding its own troubling relationship with Native American communities.

          Joe Eggers is an interdisciplinary Master of Liberal Studies student study human rights and sociology. His research examines how we define genocide by looking at the forced assimilation of Native Americans beginning in the late 19th century. 
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        • Tuesday, September 29: *PUBLIC EVENT* Peace Talk with Nagasaki atomic bomb survivor MICHIKO HARADA


          Hibakusha Peace Talk by Ms. Michiko Harada
          September 29, 2015
          4:00 PM
          120 Andersen Library
          University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, West Bank

          In commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the conclusion of WWII, and the 60th anniversary of close local ties to Nagasaki, the University of Minnesota was pleased to welcome Ms. Michiko Harada, a hibakusha (atomic bomb survivor) kataribe (storyteller), who traveled from Nagasaki, Japan and talked about her experience with the atomic bomb and why she speaks for peace. 

          Her story was compelling.  Michiko Harada was a six year old girl playing outdoors about 2 ½ miles from the epicenter of the bombing and was injured by flying glass. In the years that followed, she lost many family members to radiation illness and cancer.

          We filmed the talk, which is available on our YouTube channel.

          Turn out was great, with over 75 students and participants from the university and community in attendance.  The event was covered by the StarTribune.




           

          Held in conjunction with events at the Landmark Center in St. Paul

          Talk organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies as part of events made possible by the St. Paul-Nagasaki Sister City Committee, the Nagasaki National Peace Memorial Hall for Atomic Bomb Victims, and the United States - Japan Foundation. Co-sponsored by the University of Minnesota Department of History and the Human Rights Program.
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        • Next HGMV on Wed, Oct 28: “Memory, Affect, and Retributivism after Genocide” by Sam Grey (Fulbright Visiting Research Scholar in Sociology)

          Wednesday, October 28
          4:00 PM
          710 Social Sciences Building, West Bank

          Sam Grey:
          “Memory, Affect, and Retributivism after Genocide: Resistance to Forgiveness-Reconciliation in Dakota Homeland”



          According to legal philosopher Robert Solomon, “[n]o one, not even a saint, can have a sense of justice without the capacity for anger and outrage” – yet there has been little work on these retributive passions in the transitional justice canon generally, and virtually none in the work on Settler-colonial states in particular. While absent from the academic literature, those who express anger, resentment, and indignation in the context of Indigenous-Settler reconciliation projects are often portrayed in popular media as politically opportunistic, merely intransigent, or actually emotionally unwell. That problematic absence and these troubling portrayals are probed by examining resistance to reconciliation in Minnesota, where both Settler and Indigenous communities still struggle over the actual facts, correct interpretation, and proper response to the 1862 war with, and attempted genocide of, the Dakota Oyate (Dakota Nation) – a struggle that persists despite an unprecedented two formal reconciliation projects (a ‘year of reconciliation’ in 1987, one of the earliest examples of such work globally; and another state-wide undertaking in 2012). This exploration looks at persistent resistance to Indigenous-Settler reconciliation in Minnesota/Mini Sota Macoce from multiple political, moral, affective, and historical perspectives. It finds that expressions of retributivism in the context of an active, recurrent reparations politics are not adequately described by existing theoretical frameworks, nor can they be reduced to individual episodes of withholding, non-overcoming, or lack. They are, instead, assertions of alternative political virtues; and further, emblematic of a new, powerful, emotional, and strategic politics of ‘irreconciliation’ and ‘unforgiveness’ in Settler-colonial states.

          Sam Grey is a Fulbright Visiting Research Scholar in the Sociology Department at the University of Minnesota and a PhD candidate in Political Science at the University of Victoria (BC, Canada). Working within the fields of political theory and comparative politics, she has focused her reading on non-Western political thought; Indigenous comparative politics; feminist and gender analyses; and methodological issues. Sam’s primary research interests are political virtue, the politics of emotion, Settler colonialism, and reparations politics; more specifically, her dissertation looks at anger as a political virtue, unforgiveness as a decololonization praxis, and Indigenous-Settler ‘irreconciliation’ in the contemporary Anglosphere. As an author Sam has published on human rights, gender justice, food politics, peacemaking, contractualism/contractarianism, the ontology of health, intellectual property, solidarity politics, polygyny, and applied ethics; and is the co-editor of three books on Indigenous knowledge and rights-based advocacy. As a student and researcher she has lived and worked in Southeast Asia (Northern Thailand), South America (Andean Peru), and North America (the Canadian Great Lakes and West Coast regions, as well as the American Upper Midwest).
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        • THURSDAY, October 21: Author LOU URENECK, Archival Research at the University's Libraries, and "The Great Fire" at Smyrna


          Wednesday, October 21
          Author LOU URENECK, Boston University
          The Great Fire at Smyrna and the genocide of the Ottoman Greek and Armenian population
          120 Andersen Library

          3:30 PM - Light reception and exhibition of YMCA Archives
          4:00 PM - Talk and Q&A with the author
          5:00 PM - Book signing

          CHGS, with the University of Minnesota Libraries, was pleased to present a talk by Boston University professor and journalist Lou Ureneck on his recently published book, The Great Fire: One American's Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century's First Genocide, the harrowing story of a Methodist Minister and a principled American naval officer who helped rescue more than 250,000 refugees during the persecution of Armenian and Greek Christians, published to coincide with the Armenian genocide’s centennial in 2015.



          Professor Ureneck conducted much of his research in writing the book in the U of M Library's extensive Kautz Family YMCA Archives, highlighting the University’s unique ability to place historic events in context, and provide primary sources for study and scholarship.  A previous interview with Ureneck is available here.

          Ryan Bean, Archivist with the Libraries, introduced the collections, and Department of Political Science faculty member Catherine Guisan provided a brief overview of the history and politics of the time.  Books were available for sale at the event, and the author did a signing following the talk, attended by about 60 people.


          Co-organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Kautz Family YMCA Archives, co-sponsored by the Center for Modern Greek Studies, the Immigration History Research Center Archives, the University of Minnesota Libraries, and the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair.
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        • HGMV Meeting | Wednesday, November 4 | Wahutu Siguru: "What African Media? Rethinking Research on Representations of Africa in Africa's Press"

          Wednesday, November 4, 2015
          4:00PM
          710 Social Sciences
          Wahutu Siguru: "What African Media? Rethinking Research on Representations of Africa in Africa's Press"

          Wahutu Siguru is a PhD candidate in sociology.  In his dissertation Siguru looks at the creation of knowledge about genocide and mass atrocities in African by the media. His research leverages multiple research methodologies and theories to tease out how the press creates our knowledge of genocide and mass atrocities. He specifically looks at how Darfur has been reported on in print media from Africa and the global north. He is currently conducting a content analysis of newspapers from Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Egypt and just came back from a 6-month long fieldtrip where he interviewed journalists from Kenya, Nigeria, Uganda and South Sudan that had reported on Darfur and other atrocities around the continent; these interviews were in addition to previous interviews conducted in Kenya and South Africa in the summer of 2012. During the fieldtrip Siguru also conducted an ethnography of a journalism school in Nairobi in an attempt to understand how a highly ranked international journalism school in Nairobi taught students how to ‘become’ journalists. This specific paper uses a subsection of his content analysis and interview data. It was made possible by funding received through the Bernard and Fern Badzin and the Anna Welsch research fellowships in the Spring and summer of 2015 respectively.
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        • November 7 Educator Workshop: Lessons, Resources, Experiences

          Saturday, November 7
          9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
          1210 Heller Hall
          West Bank, University of Minnesota

          Six licensed educators attended the Institute for Global Studies summer institute, Holocaust Education in a Global Context on June 15-18, 2015. The following two weeks, these six educators worked to accumulate and create lesson plans, resources, and information which will aid in teaching about the Armenian Genocide, the Rwandan Genocide, the Cambodian Genocide, the Dakota War, and the Holocaust. These teachers will be talking about their experience and presenting their materials in the daylong workshop.

          Free workshop, open to educators, worth 6 CEUs. The session is full and registration is closed.
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        • Canadian scholar, Adam Muller, will speak about the creation of an immersive virtual education tool representing an Indian Residential School in an attempt to bring survivors of genocide closer to secondary witnesses

          Embodying Empathy: Canadian Settler-Colonial Genocide and the Making of a Virtual Indian Residential School
          Adam Muller, University of Manitoba  

          Wednesday, November 18
          4:00 PM
          710 Social Sciences
          West Bank, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

          This presentation introduces and reflects on some of the key challenges facing researchers involved with the multidisciplinary critical and creative Embodying Empathy project now underway at the University of Manitoba. Embodying Empathy seeks to construct a digital representation of a Canadian Indian Residential School (IRS) using virtual and augmented reality technologies. The project’s digital “storyworld” is being designed as a museum-quality educational tool that will instruct those immersed in it about Canadian settler-colonial genocide. It also seeks to ascertain whether immersive representations can bridge the empathetic distance separating victims from secondary witnesses to atrocity.

          Adam Muller is Associate Professor of English at the University of Manitoba (Canada). He specializes in the representations of war, genocide and mass violence, human rights, memory studies, critical theory, cultural studies, and analytic philosophy.

          Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, the Institute for Advanced Study collaborative "Reframing Mass Violence," and the Minnesota Humanities Center.
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        • December 1: Discussion on the implications of comparing the experiences of Jews and Native Americans

          Reflections on the Comparison of
          Jews and Native Americans as Victims
          by LEO REIGERT, Kenyon College

          Tuesday, December 1
          1:00-2:30 PM
          Folwell 113

          Jews and Native Americans are often rhetorically connected as victims of genocide by members of both groups. In this talk, Associate Professor of German at Kenyan College, Leo Reigert, will reflect from both a personal and scholarly perspective on what is gained and lost in such representations. Compared to the Holocaust, public acknowledgement of the genocide committed against the Native Americans remains limited, not to speak of restitution or the payment of reparations. This, it will be argued, has important ramifications for writing and thinking about the two groups.



          Leo Reigert is Associate Professor of German, Kenyan Collge. This talk is part of his new project investigating the encounter with Native Americans in the lives and works of German Jewish authors from the nineteenth century to the present day.
           

          Organized by The Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Center for Jewish Studies, and the Department of American Indian Studies.
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        • November 30 APPLICATION DEADLINE: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Fellowship for 2016-2017

          The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies awards fellowships on a competitive basis to support significant research and writing about the Holocaust. We welcome proposals from scholars in all academic disciplines, including but not limited to history, political science, literature, Jewish studies, philosophy, religion, sociology, anthropology, comparative genocide studies, and law.

          Stipends range up to $3,500 per month for the purpose of defraying local housing and other miscellaneous living expenses and are subject to US tax law. Residents of the Washington, DC, metropolitan area receive a reduced stipend of $1,750 per month. Awards include a stipend to offset the cost of direct travel to and from Washington, DC. Residents of the Washington, DC, metropolitan area do not receive a travel stipend. The funds provided through this award may be subject to US federal and/or state tax. Please be advised the Mandel Center cannot provide individual tax advice.

          Accepting applications for the 2016–2017 fellowship competition: September 1, 2015–November 30, 2015.

          For more information: http://www.ushmm.org/research/competitive-academic-programs/fellowship-competition  
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        • Film screening and Q&A with producer Kemal Pervanic: 'Pretty Villiage' (Sat, Oct 17, 4:30pm, St. Anthony Main #3)

          Saturday, October 17
          4:30 PM
          St. Anthony Main Theatre #3

          'Pretty Village' is an acclaimed documentary about Bosnia about what happens to ordinary people when their lives are torn apart by war.  The film was produced by UK-based Bosnian arts activist, Kemal Pervanic, a survivor of the Omarska Death camp. It documents his return to his former village to collect survivor stories and bear witness the atrocities that occurred there during the Bosnian war. Kemal will be passing through Minnesota (he now resides in the UK) and the MN Film society will present this screening with him in attendance, available for audience Q&A.

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        • TUESDAY and THURSDAY, October 13 and 15: International artist DANIEL BLAUFUKS events to include Artist Talk and Film Screening


          The Twin Cities, the University of Minnesota, and CHGS and its many co-sponsors welcome a visit by Lisbon-based German-Jewish media artist DANIEL BLAUFUKS




          Film clips, artist talk and scholarly roundtable discussion
          Tuesday, October 13
          5:30 - 6:00 PM -- Film clips from Als Ob / As If
          6:15 - 7:30 PM -- Roundtable discussion with panel of scholars and artists
          Panel to include University of Minnesota faculty Gary Cohen (History), Paula Rabinowitz (English), Alice Lovejoy (Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature), and Leslie Morris (German, Scandinavian and Dutch); and David Harris (RIMON: The Minnesota Jewish Arts Council, an initiative of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation)
          Weisman Art Museum

          Meet the artist and film screening
          Thursday, October 15
          10:00 - 11:30 AM Coffee with the artist
          10:00 AM - 5:00 PM Als Ob / As If Film installation on the Czech city of Terezín / WWII Jewish camp-ghetto of Theresienstadt
          Weisman Art Museum

          Daniel Blaufuks is an acclaimed artist working in Lisbon and exhibiting internationally. His exhibition, "All the Memory of the World, Part One," has as its theme the creation of memory through media. In other words: the use of film and photography to create memories, even memories that are actually fictional. Please read more about this exhibition here.

          At the center of the exhibition is "Als Ob / As If," a monumental 4-hour film installation. In Als Ob, Blaufuks combines footage he shot in 2014 in the Czech city of Terezín, which was formerly the Jewish ghetto of Theresienstadt, with footage from Nazi propaganda films.

          The contemporary clips are of everything that makes up the life of a normal city. They are reflected in clips from the fake documentary "Theresienstadt" made by the Germans in 1944, which pretended to show how normal the city/ghetto/concentration camp was. In the propaganda film, we see the elderly passing by, children playing, and chess-playing men. Combining clips from these two films is powerful, especially as Blaufuks purposely filmed some scenes in the same locations that the Nazi video depicts.

          Blaufuks was born in Lisbon in 1963 to a family of Jewish German refugees. He studied at Ar.Co (Centro de Arte e Comunicação Visual), Lisbon, at the Royal College of Art, London and at the Watermill Foundation, New York. He exhibits widely and works mainly in photography and video, presenting his work through books, installations and films.

          The documentary "Under Strange Skies" was shown at the Lincoln Center in New York. His exhibitions include: Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon, Palazzo delle Papesse, Siena, LisboaPhoto, Centro Cultural de Belém, Lisbon, Elga Wimmer Gallery, New York, Photoespaña, Madrid, where his book Under Strange Skies received the award for Best Photography Book of the Year in the International Category in 2007, the year he received the BES Photo Award as well. He published Terezín with Steidl, Götingen. In 2011 he had a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro and in 2014 at the National Museum of Contemporary Art in Lisbon. For more information see http://www.danielblaufuks.com

          Event organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, co-sponsored by the Center for Austrian Studies, Center for Jewish Studies, Center for German and European Studies, College of Liberal Arts, Department of Art, Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, Department of English, Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch, Department of History, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Institute for Advanced Study, Weisman Art Museum, and Macalester College. Additional support from RIMON: The Minnesota Jewish Arts Council, an initiative of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation.
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        • How to understand and decode humor in the Terezin ghetto: A Sunday afternoon talk by Dr. Lisa Peschel following matinee stage performance of WHY WE LAUGH

          Dr. Lisa Peschel, University of York
          "Translating Terezín"
          A talk to follow Sunday matinee performance of Why We Laugh
          (to conclude long before sundown)

          WHY WE LAUGH 
          Sunday Matinee Performance
          September 13
          2:00 PM
          Open Eye Figure Theatre
          506 East 24th Street, Minneapolis MN 55404

          Admission is $20general; $15 for students, seniors, and MN Fringe button holders.
          Tickets are available through Open Eye Figure Theatre or through Brown Paper Tickets.

          WHY WE LAUGH is a new adaptation of Laugh with Us!, an original cabaret by Felix Porges, Vítězslav Horpatzky, Pavel Weisskopf and Pavel Stránský, written and performed in 1944 in the World War II Jewish Ghetto at Terezín, just 40 miles northwest of Prague (English translation & dramaturgy by Lisa Peschel).

          Dr. Lisa Peschel, the scholar who discovered the cabaret texts and translated them into English (they are collected in the book Performing Captivity, Performing Escape) will deliver a brief talk after the performance on Sunday, September 13. Entitled Translating Terezin, it will be the story of Peschel’s search for the meaning of the text—how, with the aid of survivors she cracked the code of the slang and inside jokes to capture the prisoners’ unique, resilient sense of humor. A question and answer period will follow.



          The cabaret, complete with its original sheet music, came to light in the spring of 2005 in two separate family archives. The original cabaret is set in a postwar Prague identical to the beloved city the Czech Jews remembered from the late 1930s. In playwright Kira Obolensky’s new adaptation, characters based on the original Terezín performers encounter “the scholar,” a theater historian from our present.  As the performers look forward to the postwar future and the scholar looks back toward their past, they confront each other with difficult questions: Why did the Terezín prisoners laugh, and what does that laughter mean to us today?

          For more information please visit Fortune's Fool Theatre.

          Talk organized by the Center for Austrian Studies, co-sponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Center for Jewish Studies.  Production of Why We Laugh is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund; and by a grant from RIMON: The Minnesota Jewish Arts Council, an initiative of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation.
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        • Courses of interest for the Fall 2015 semester

            GER 1905 -- Freshman Seminar: Remediating the Holocaust (Leslie Morris, Th 4:40-7:10pm, Kolthoff Hall 139)
            HIST 3727 -- History of the Holocaust (Adam Blackler, M/W 9:45-11:00am, Nicholson 110)
            Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians. 
            GCC 3002 -- Grand Challenges: Beyond War and Atrocity (Alejandro Baer, Catherine Guisan, Tu/Th 11:15-12:30pm, Anderson Hall 330)
            SOC 4104 -- Crime and Human Rights (Joachim Savelsberg, Tu/Th 2:30-3:45pm, Blegen 225)
            AMIN 1001 -- American Indian Peoples in the United States (Tu/Th 1:00-2:15, Elliott N647)
            Introduction to how voices/visions of indigenous peoples have contributed to history of cultural expression in North America. Historic contexts/varieties of this expression by region, tribal cultures. Emphasizes contributions in literature, philosophy, politics, fine arts.
            AMIN 1003 -- American Indians in Minnesota (multiple listings)
            History, culture, and lived experience of American Indian people in Minnesota. Self-representation and histories of Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) and Dakota peoples through film, music, oral traditions, and written texts. Work by non-Indian scholars focuses on cultural, philosophical, and linguistic perspectives of Anishinaabe and Dakota peoples.
            HIST 3872 -- American Indian History since 1830 (W 6:20-8:30, Blegen 110)
            Focus on the impact of federal Indian policy on American Indian cultures and societies, and on American Indian culture change.
            HIST 5940 -- Topics in Asian History: Cultures of Modernity and Memories of the Past in East Asia (Liping Wang, W 3:35-5:30, Carlson 1-122)
            PubH 6801 / 3802 -- Health and Human Rights (Kirk Allison, W 5:40-8:30pm)
            POL 8260 -- Topics in Political Theory: Colonialism (Th 3:35-5:20pm, Soc Sci 1383)
            POL 8660 -- Topics in Comparative Politics: Authoritarian Regimes (David Samuels, Tu 1:25-3:20pm, Blegen 330)
            SPAN 3221 -- Interpreting Colonial Latin America: Empire and Early Modernity (Raul Marrero-Fente, Tu/Thu 1:00-2:15pm, Nicholson 120)
            Conquest, colonization, and forms of resistance in Latin America.

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            • 2015 IAGS Conference Review by JOE EGGERS

              In July, I had the privilege of presenting at the International Association of Genocide Scholarstwelfth meeting in Yerevan, Armenia. The conference’s theme of comparative analysis of twentieth century genocides brought experts from around the world to Armenia’s capital city for five days of presentations, learning, and networking. More than 180 attendees, representing more than two dozen countries, shared their research and insight into many of the twentieth century’s most infamous atrocities.

              The conference began on Wednesday, July 8th with a welcome from Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan to attendees. In his address, President Sargsyan discussed the legacy of the Armenian Genocide, not only for the Armenian people, but all of humanity. He also spoke about moving forward, highlighted by his announcement of the creation of a new biannual conference sponsored by the Armenian Republic that will discuss the lasting effects of genocide and how the global community can overcome episodes of violence. A full transcript of President Sargsyan’s address can be found on the Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute’s website.

              The conference kicked off Thursday morning with more than 20 breakout sessions exploring themes like prevention, intergenerational trauma, perpetrator justice, and gender and sexuality. I presented research I did this past spring, comparing themes of nationalism in pre-genocide late Ottoman and early American politics. University of Minnesota alumna and current Ohio State sociology professor Dr. Hollie Brehm presented her research analyzing rates of violence at a community level during the Rwandan Genocide.

              My favorite session was the cultural genocide breakout. The presentations primarily focused on the continuing destruction and appropriation of Khachkars, ornate stone crosses, and Armenian churches that are scattered across modern Turkey. The presenters brought different and insightful perspectives to the session; an art historian talked about the effect the destruction from an artistic perspective and an Armenian PhD student shared her research from the viewpoint of the Armenian people. There was a great conversation that followed, discussing the limits of the legal definition of genocide versus Raphael Lemkin’s original ideas. The session was moderated by Dr. Adam Muller of the University of Manitoba. Dr. Muller will be visiting the University this fall to discuss his virtual museum project which sheds light on the residential schools for Canada’s First Nations people.


              On Thursday evening, we were given a tour of the renovated Armenian Genocide Museum and Tsitsernakaberd, Armenia’s official memorial site. Visiting the museum had a tremendous effect on me. It was a reminder of the human toll of the first genocide of the twentieth century, something I had only experienced through books and documentaries. The museum recently opened its expanded exhibit with new photographs, artifacts, and testimonials in time for the commemorative events marking the 100th anniversary of the genocide. The tour was led by Dr. Hayk Demoyan, the director of the museum and organizer of the conference.

              The conference came to an end on Sunday with the unveiling of a stamp by the IAGS executive committee and the Armenian Postal Service, commemorating the conference. Sunday was also Vardavar, the Armenian water festival in which kids toss water on unsuspecting passersby. The soakings made for a refreshing end to an incredible, and hot, conference in Yerevan.

              Created in 1994, the International Association of Genocide Scholars is one of the world’s largest groups dedicated to gaining a greater understanding of episodes of genocide and mass atrocities. In 2001, the University of Minnesota hosted the conference. IAGS’ next conference will be in July 2017 in Phnom Penh at the newly opened Sleuk Rith Institute which is Cambodia’s permanent research 
              center dedicated to the Cambodian Genocide.

              Joe Eggers is a M.A. graduate student and Graduate Assistant with the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.
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            • Srebrenica: What Remains 20 Years Later, by ERMA NEZIREVIC

              Recently I laid over at Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport, at which the Delta Airlines security agent checked my U.S. passport prior to boarding the plane to Minneapolis. Upon seeing my name and place of birth (Bosnia and Herzegovina), he asked in Serbian if I spoke "our language." I responded with a "yes, of course," and he completed the rest of the security procedure in ‘our language,’ revealing that he is a Serb who escaped to the Netherlands in 1991 because he did not want to have to fight the Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) or the Croats, as they are all "my people, our people."

              Coincidentally, this random interaction occurred only two days after the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide, which took place on July 11, 1995. It made me ponder the use of the word ‘our’ in this brief conversation. We all clearly still have a lot in common: the primary, and perhaps strongest, connection being the language. ‘Our’ language, as the security agent used it, refers to Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian. However, in ‘our’ language, there is still a contention over what happened in Srebrenica. Recently, Russia, Serbia’s ally, had vetoed the UN Security Council measure that labeled Srebrenica a genocide. Killing people based on their identity is a very basic definition of genocide, and denying that is to politicize it once again, and take away from the core of what this event should represent 20 years later, which is healing and hope for the future. 



              Leading up to the anniversary itself, much of the world media had been referring to the genocide as the worst case of mass violence on the European continent since World War II. The systematic killing of over eight thousand Bosnian Muslim men and young boys in what was considered a UN safe haven shows nothing short of failure on the part of Europe for not holding up the 'never again' promise. What remains at stake now is the way we remember this horrific event based on the language used to label it. Srebrenica has been labeled a crime, and a massacre, but why not genocide?

              During the 20th anniversary commemoration ceremony, President Bill Clinton begged the international community to not treat this as a mere monument, but as a sacred trust for healing, implying that Srebrenica shouldn’t be a place of forgetting but of active remembering. Therefore, education is crucial to its memory. The members of various refugee communities scattered around the world have already done a lot in this respect, but education must continue for the sake of future generations of not only Bosniaks, but also Serbs and Croats. After all, it is something that marked all of “us.” We also shouldn’t forget that Bosnia is made up of many ‘little Srebrenicas’ that amount to many more victims and their grieving families. Ultimately, what Srebrenica must remind us of is our common humanity, and that conflicts rooted in identity continue to be a struggle for the world.


              In April of this year, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies hosted an international conference on the 100 years of the Armenian Genocide, bringing the struggle over its acknowledgement to the forefront. For many like myself, this served as a reminder of the politicization around Srebrenica as well. The question is then, are we going to treat Srebrenica the same way in the upcoming century? 

              Erma Nezirevic is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Sociology, and coordinator of the HGMV workshop series for CHGS.
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            • Interview with Professor JOACHIM SAVELSBERG, Professor of Sociology, on his recent book, "Representing Mass Violence" by WAHUTU SIGURU

              Wahutu: What was the main motivation behind this current book, Representing Mass Violence: Conflicting Responses to Human Rights Violations in Darfur?

              Prof. Savelsberg: You know that I have a longstanding interest in the way in which institutions of justice, and currently transitional justice, affect collective representations or collective memories of events, especially mass atrocities. And so, the motivation for this book on Darfur was to understand how interventions by the UN Security Council and the International Criminal Court (ICC) affect how global civil society thinks about such events, the way people imagine such events. And, part of the original design was to do a comparative study of eight countries. Even though the ICC is a global institution, the kinds of messages that it sends out, the kinds of representation of events that it offers are filtered by national institutions, they are reinforced by carrier groups in one country, but less so in another country. They find more receptive audiences in a country that has maybe dealt with mass atrocities in the past than in another country that hasn’t. So that was the main motivation, to understand how interventions, in this case by the UN Security Council and the ICC, affect the representation of Darfur in the public sphere. Initially I only thought of news media, that’s why we did a comparative analysis of newspapers in eight countries. And then, in the course of the research, I became aware that representations do not just differ by country but also by social fields. I was interested from the beginning in how human rights activists, and I selected Amnesty International as an example, talk about Darfur. How they reflect on the interventions by the ICC and the UN Security Council. But in my interviews I also ended up targeting a humanitarian aid NGO , for which I picked Doctors without Borders. I additionally interviewed diplomats from foreign ministries, or state departments if you want, and I saw that different fields talk in quite different terms about the violence in Darfur. Just as I was interested in the country-specific conditions that lead to a selective communication of ICC representations, so I became interested in the field-specific conditions that affect communication about Darfur.

              Wahutu: Previous work has not done this much data collection or analysis.  From what you have said, the data collection and analysis seems like a really important part of how you wanted to do this project.  Why was it important for you to do the interviews, to do the content analysis of news reports and travel to all of these countries?

              Prof. Savelsberg: It was important for a number of reasons. The first reason is that we know that global institutions of justice like the ICC are extremely modern. Human history hasn’t really known them. We’ve known ad hoc courts in the twentieth century, but not a permanent international criminal court. We have very little systematic knowledge about the effects of these institutions. It would be desirable of course to measure the effect of ICC interventions on the future likelihood of genocide and crimes against humanity and war crimes. That would be a very tall order, and we will have to tackle this at some point. I wasn’t able to go that far, but one interim step is to think about how these interventions affect the way the world thinks about mass atrocities. It is not at all for granted that people in different countries take note of what is going on. Even if institutions like the ICC intervene, there is a long history of denial, of closing one’s eyes, especially if atrocities occur in a far-away place in the world. So it was very important to me to begin to systematically measure the effects of these sorts of interventions in a cautious way, by first looking at the impact they have on the degree to which and the way in which mass atrocities are represented and perceived.

              Wahutu: What would you say was one of the most surprising findings that jumped out at you?


              Prof. Savelsberg: There a re a number of surprising findings. One of the things that really impressed me was when I conducted my interviews among diplomats who were interested in negotiating deals with the Sudanese government to establish peace; with humanitarian aid people who were interested in getting their aid on the ground and collaborating, say, with the Sudanese ministry of health; and with human rights activists. To see the seriousness with which all of these actors, many of whom impressed me deeply, pursued what they were doing. How at the same time their views of the violence differed depending on the role that especially the Sudanese state played in their respective fields. Diplomats need to negotiate with the Sudanese state, humanitarian aid workers need to collaborate with administrative units of the Sudanese state, and human rights activists don’t do that.  But many of these people had been to Darfur, they had worked on the ground, they had also – the same is true for Africa correspondents - left the comfort of their homes in Philadelphia or Berlin or London only to spend years in rather tough settings, to witness situations that are not easy for people to bear. So many of these people impressed me profoundly. At the same time, I took note that each of them had a different view of the violence on the ground. So this is, if you want, a kind of sociology of knowledge exercise. You see how the world and events in the world take different shape, appear in a different light, when seen through different lenses, through different frames. So that’s one thing that surprised me and then there were many little observations pertaining to national particularities. For example we found in our media analysis that the term genocide was used relatively rarely in German news reports, which to me was counter intuitive, given Germany’s history of the Holocaust. But, in the interviews I conducted, I got a number of suggestions as to how to interpret such a finding. One Africa correspondent for a prominent German newspaper said that when he thought of genocide, he categorised the Holocaust under that label, and while knowing how horrific things were in Darfur, he had a hard time placing Darfur under the same category where in his mind the Holocaust was already placed. Or, the director of a major national Holocaust memorial institution in Germany said that the Americans could draw parallels between the Holocaust and Darfur - and this is a man who is a Rabbi and a son of an Auschwitz survivor - but as Germans, he said, we could not do that because as soon Germans drew a parallel between the Holocaust and events such as Darfur people would accuse them of trying to relativize what happened during the Holocaust. So there are cultural sensitivities in specific countries -- and this is just one example from the German part of the study -- that  filter and generate caution towards the use of certain terms. Clearly Germay differs from the United States, for example, where the use of the term genocide and metaphorical bridging to the Holocaust was used very generously, and the explanation is relatively simple. It has to do with the strength of the Save Darfur movement in the US, and this strength had to do with the fact that there were a number of, in Weberian or Mannheimian terms, carrier groups that identified with the cause of Darfur. So there were African Americans who identified with the victims who were defined as ‘black Africans’. There were American Jews who, after the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington issued a genocide alert, identified with this cause, and there were evangelical Christians on the conservative side of the political spectrum who had done a lot of missionary work, not in Darfur but in South Sudan, but who therefore were quite sensitive to human rights violations in that country. So you have Germany and the United States as two examples where country specific sensitivities and carrier groups contribute to a different reception of the events in Darfur. At the same time both the United States and Germany were the two countries that stood out in terms of the intensity of reporting. German cultural sensitivities thus do not mean that German journalists didn’t take note, quite the opposite, despite their cautious use of the term genocide. The other noteworthy result is that indeed certain interventions by institutions like the ICC revived, every time they occurred, global interest in Darfur. The flattening of the pattern of attention that normally occurs soon after instances of mass violence was thus delayed by three or four years in the case of Darfur.  The other noteworthy finding is that definitions by the criminal justice system are more strongly reflected in  media reporting than the representation of events by diplomats or humanitarian aid organizations. Why this is the case is a separate question, and I have some ideas about this that I explore in the book. I have found similar patterns, by the way, on previous occasions like in my study on the My Lai massacre during the Vietnam War.

              Wahutu: What message do you hope a reader of your book gets from it when they read it?

              Prof. Savelsberg: I think that the book would help people understand how mass violence that occurs in the global south, for example in Darfur, goes through a number of processes and filters before news about it reach us as member of civil society; understand the cultural and structural processes and the institutions that are embedded in different fields and that are associated with different countries; understand how that which happens on the ground, which almost none of us, very few people, will observe with our own eyes, reaches us as members of civil society, or maybe of global society; understand the process through which those events are filtered, or constructed if you want. So this helps us understand what it is that we learn about through public information about mass violence in the global south.

              Wahutu: So what you are saying is that for a reader you hope that the message is that by the time they watch, read or hear about on going atrocities such as Darfur, they remember that it goes through several filtering processes to get to them. As such, is it then upon the reader to be a bit more active in seeking more information and seeking more diverse voices?

              Prof. Savelsberg:  Yes, I think the book provides us with the critical tools that we need in order to be mature consumers of these kinds of news. We read the news and, having read this book about Representing Mass Violence, we are in better position to understand what processes the events as they were written about and described have gone through before they reach us.

              Wahutu: What are some of the challenges in writing such a book? You talk to professionals and practitioners form such diverse walks of life who, as much as they are dealing with getting the message out, have different constituencies. So what are some of the challenges in trying to navigate that terrain?

              Prof. Savelsberg: Well, the main challenge was the huge effort at data collection. The media analysis had five research assistants who analysed  more than 3000 news articles. To conduct the interview meant travelling to Berlin, Paris, London, Dublin, Zurich, Geneva, Vienna, Washington, New York, and so many other places. So it was a major effort just to collect the data. In the interview situations, it was important to capture the voices of these different actors that operate in distinct fields, not to impose of them my understanding of the situation, but to minimise the interviewer effect and to get their perception as clearly as possible. I think I succeeded in this, especially since people are so embedded in their fields; the way they see the world thus is so matter of course to them, and is reinforced by the institutions and educational process they have been exposed to.

              Wahutu: So onto my last question. You book is available to download for free, what was the thinking behind that?

              Prof. Savelsberg: For the publisher, the University of California Press, the thinking behind this was that books used to sell many copies to university libraries, which brought in their expenses, on the average anyway, so they didn’t run a deficit. University libraries have change their purchasing practices. They have smaller budgets now, they can’t buy as many books, and they buy more electronic sources than paper products. So the presses are really under pressure to come up with new models of funding publications. In my case they offered me either to go the traditional way or to use this innovative model, and I chose the innovative way for a number of reasons. An important reason is that I think this mechanism will allow for a better distribution of the book, and especially a book dealing with mass violence in the global south, in which many people who’d be interested in the subject don’t have an easy time to just write somewhere and order a paper copy and pay for it. So this model will increase availability particularly in those parts of the world that I would like to reach with my book but that may not as easily get a hold of the paper copy. Do I pay a price for it? Yes I had to waive any royalties, but that was easy for me to do.

              Wahutu: Thank you so much for agreeing to do this.


              Prof. Savelsberg: You are welcome, Wahutu.
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            • Impressions after a semester of HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST and a visit by Holocaust survivor IRENE BERMAN

              My name is Joshkin Sezer. I am a history major who is starting his third year at the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities. In the Spring Semester of 2015, I enrolled in History of the Holocaust, instructed by Adam Blackler. Near the end of the semester, we got the chance to hear a talk from a Holocaust survivor, Irene Berman. She had just published a book detailing her experience as a child in Norway during the Holocaust and how her family managed to survive. 

              After taking some time to think about Irene Berman’s talk to my class, I continue to be intrigued by what I learned about the Norwegian Jewish population and their struggles during the Holocaust. It is not a topic that comes up very often (if ever) in the United States. It was not until I enrolled in the History of the Holocaust at the University of Minnesota that I developed a better sense of what life was like for Jews who lived outside of Eastern and Central Europe.

              Though the crimes of the Third Reich cast a long shadow, Irene’s story made that a reality for those of us who listened to her presentation. She gave a face to the victims of Holocaust. It is far too easy to become overcome by numbers and statistics when we think of the crimes committed by the Nazis. Is it possible to know the entire story? Certainly not, but learning a few of them will no doubt help to prevent a future Holocaust. 

              And it was not just Irene’s talk that provided a face to those that were lost. Adam also did a great job in offering a human element to the story. He was helped in part by his refusal to create black-and-white narrative. Indeed, saying, “all Germans were Nazis” and that “all Jews helpless sheep” does a tremendous disservice to the complexity and tragedy of the events that comprise the Holocaust. Nothing was inevitable. Conscious actors made decisions to participate. “How” and “why” are more difficult questions to answer, and as such were the central focus of Adam’s course.

              But what form might this take outside of the classroom? In my opinion, museums are among the best examples that can provide a human element to history. Unfortunately, however, the most important audience -- children and young adults -- often avoid them out of fear of boredom, or only go as part of a class fieldtrip or family vacation. In June 2015, I traveled to Washington, D.C. to visit a friend. While there, we went to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, which Adam often referenced in class. When I got to the Museum, I saw the trouble with taking kids in 7th or 8th grade to the Museum. While there, I found out is that a lot of these kids do not actually care about the subject of the Museum. They are more interested taking selfies, talking loudly and laughing. 

              I took this class hoping to answer a basic question: “What exactly is the point of studying history?” As a history major, I get asked this question all the time, and I do not always have an adequate answer to it. After this class, though, I can honestly say that the point of studying history is to better understand the human condition. History is not a mere collection of events and social movements that inevitably occurred, but a collection of actions and consequence made by individuals. People who had hopes, dreams, and desires all of their own. 

              One day I hope to be a teacher, and everything I have learned in this class will be useful for teaching kids not only about the Holocaust, but also about how to consider history in a more nuanced way.
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            • September 24: "If that's true then I'm a murderer!" film screening and discussion with director on Nazi perpetrator guilt, repression, and denial

              Thursday, September 24, 2015
              4:00 - 6:00 PM
              Film screening and talk
              1210 Heller Hall

              WALTER MANOSCHEK (political science, University of Vienna)
              "If that's True, then I'm a Murderer!" Adolf Storms and the Massacre of Hungarian Jews in Deutsch Schuetzen (2012, 70 mins, German with English subtitles)
              Film screening and discussion on Nazi perpetrator guilt, repression, and denial





              ...dann bin ich ja ein Mörder! (70 min), a film created by Professor Walter Manoschek together with his students at the University of Vienna, the story of SS junior squad leader Adolf Storms, who has never been held accountable for the death of about sixty Hungarian Jewish forced laborers shot by three SS men in the village of Deutsch-Schützen in the Austrian province of Burgenland.

              In conversations with Storms, HJ leaders who were accessories of the crime, and Jews who survived the massacre, the crime is reconstructed and questions are asked about forgetting, repression and responsibility. The film had its world premier at the Viennale Film Festival 2012, where it won the Prize of Recognition of the City of Vienna.

              A timely event with the recent trial of the former SS-man, Oskar Groening who served in Auschwitz and stood trial for war crimes. 

              Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, with co-sponsorship by the Center for Austrian Studies.
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            • September 16 talk by Benjamin Frommer -- The Last Jews: Intermarried Families in the Nazi Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia

              Wednesday, September 16
              4:00 PM
              Benjamin Frommer, Northwestern University

              The Last Jews: Intermarried Families in the Nazi Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia
              710 Social Sciences Building



              This talk will address the fate of intermarried Jewish-Gentile families in the Germany occupied Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia during the Second World War. 

              Intermarried Jews and their progeny formed a special category in the lands ruled by the Nazis.  On the one hand, many who had married Gentiles and even converted to Christianity found themselves forcibly recategorized as Jews and subject to antisemitic persecution and the threat of arrest.  On the other hand, the intermarried had stronger ties to the majority communities, were exempted from certain restrictions and some deportations, and ultimately survived the war in far greater numbers than endogamous Jews.  In time, as Nazi Germany deported more and more Jews to concentration camps and ghettos, intermarried Jews and their progeny increasingly became the “last Jews” alive in the Protectorate.

              Organized by the Center for Austrian Studies, cosponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.
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            • Holocaust Education in a Global Context Teacher Workshop, June 15-18

              The genocide of the Jews during World War II has become a global reference point to raise awareness about state violence and human rights abuses. This summer institute will explore the opportunities and challenges of Holocaust education and memorialization in diverse cultural contexts, particularly in heterogeneous classrooms in which students have no connection with the history of the Jewish people and Nazi crimes.

              Adam Blackler delivers a brief history of the Holocaust to our engaged group of workshop participants
              The institute addresses the historical and sociological significance of the Holocaust in a comparative genocide framework (Native American, Armenian, Cambodian and Rwandan genocides) and provides hands on activities - with survivor testimony, literature, art and film - designed to help educators create activities and lessons accessible to all learners that they can incorporate into their classrooms.





              Elizabeth Baer
              Monday, June 15
              8:30 - 9:00 -- Registration
               9:00 - 9:30 -- Introduction (Alejandro Baer)
              9:30 - 12:00 -- Brief History of the Holocaust (Adam Blackler)
              12:00 - 1:00 -- Lunch
              1:00 - 3:30 -- The Crime of Genocide: Definition, Ambivalences, Implications (Alejandro Baer)

              Group lunch at Middlebrook Hall
              Tuesday, June 16
              9:00 - 12:00 -- Colonial Genocides and the Holocaust: Continuities and Breaches (Elizabeth Baer)
              12:00 - 1:00 -- Lunch
              1:00 - 3:30 -- Global Holocaust Memory: Challenges and Opportunities (Alejandro Baer)
              Field trip to Bdote Dakota site of Ft. Snelling State Park

              Wednesday, June 17
              9:00 - 12:00 -- Field Trip: Guided Tour of Bdote site, Ft. Snelling State Park (Sandra Geshick)
              12:00 - 1:00 -- Lunch
              1:00 - 3:30 -- Gender and Memory in the Holocaust (Elizabeth Baer)

              Joe Eggers presented a robust set of resources by topic

              Thursday, June 18
              9:00 - 11:00 -- Presentation of Holocaust / Genocide education resources (Joe Eggers)
              11:00 - 12:00 -- Teaching and Research with Audiovisual Testimonials (Susan Gangl)
              12:00 - 1:00 -- Lunch
              1:00 - 3:00 -- Presentation of Best Practices (participant-led)
              3:00 - 3:30 -- Course Feedback and Follow-up

              Thanks to everyone for a successful workshop and great learning experience!
              Events made possible by the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.
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            • Community Event | Deportation in the Armenian Genocide: TMORA special exhibition, June 20-22

              The Museum of Russian Art (TMORA) in Minneapolis, MN, in collaboration with the St. Sahag Armenian Church of St. Paul, Minnesota, will host a three-day exhibition dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, open from June 20 to June 22, 2015. The materials for the exhibition were provided by the Armenian National Institute, an organization focusing on “the study, research and affirmation of the Armenian genocide.” This exhibition, THE FIRST DEPORTATION: THE GERMAN RAILWAY, THE AMERICAN HOSPITAL, AND THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE is a project of the Armenian National Institute, Armenian Genocide Museum of America, and
              Armenian Assembly of America.

              The exhibit reveals various facets of the genocide, including the deportations, executions, massacres, murders, starvation, extermination and destruction. It also documents the immediate aftermath of the atrocities, attesting to the catastrophic destruction of the Armenian society in the Ottoman Turkish Empire. The scale and depth of the uprooting of the Armenian people are revealed through twenty-four panels filled with photographs, documents and explanatory texts.

              The deportation of 1915. The entire Armenian population of eight
              towns—about 170,000 in total—had been put on the road.


              The First Deportation: The German Railway, The American Hospital, and the Armenian Genocide is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a Minnesota State Arts Board Operating Support grant, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund, and a grant from the Wells Fargo Foundation Minnesota.
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            • Daniel Levy "The Past: Between History and Memory" | Keynote as part of International Symposium on the 70th Anniversary of the Conclusion of WWII in Europe

              International Symposium:
              War, what is it good for? Uses and Abuses of Second World War History

              Keynote:
              The Past: Between History and Memory
              Daniel Levy 

              Friday, May 8, 2015
              1210 Heller Hall
              University of Minnesota

              In 1969 Edwin Starr famously asked "war, what is it good for?" and answered "absolutely nothing." Regardless of whether organized violence is ever a good way to achieve various political goals, war history is often usable past in the present. Second World War as the "good war" or the "great patriotic war" can be put to many uses by contemporary political actors. This event explored the actual and potential uses of second world war history 70 years after war's end in Europe.

              The one-day symposium addressed the usage of war history in both, international and domestic politics. For the international sphere the main focus was on the use of the war in contemporary European politics, especially in Russia, Central and Eastern Europe, the West, and in relations between them. Is history politics just continuation of war by other means or can war history be used to build peaceful relations between former enemies? In the domestic sphere WWII history is mostly used to construct unified nations, but in the symposium participants analyzed how war history has been or could be used in emancipatory ways to empower marginalized groups within societies.

              levy.jpg
              Professor Daniel Levy (Sociology, Stony Brook University and author of Memory Unbound: The Holocaust and the Formation of Cosmopolitan Memory

              In his keynote, "The Past: Between History and Memory", Levy addressed the contested relationship between history and memory, changing time conceptions, the role of nation-state formation, and the human rights regime. Levy drew from his work on cosmopolitanization, noting that global norms and narratives intersect with local practices in generative ways, shaping new realities. He highlighted the example of the Holocaust as having made the transition from European to global cypher, thus becoming legible in differing contexts around the world.  





              10:00-11:45
              Morning session

              Social Sciences 710

              10:00-10:15
              Welcome words: Matti Jutila, Alejandro Baer
              10:15-11:00
              Keynote: Daniel Levy (Sociology, Stony Brook University)
              "The Past: Between History and Memory"

              The connection between history and memory has a long and contentious relationship. Recent scholarship associated with the so-called third wave of memory studies is challenging some of the historiographical presuppositions of what a past consists of. This talk will address some of these trajectories and advance a number of conceptual suggestions.
              11:00-11:45
              Comments and discussion: Thomas Wolfe, Matti Jutila, Erma Nezirevic





              2:00-2:45
              Afternoon session 1: International History Politics in Europe

              Heller Hall 1210

              Thomas Wolfe (History, University of Minnesota): "Putin's History"
              How do authoritarian regimes both need and ignore the writing of history? Putin's Russia offers on the one hand a striking example of a regime building an image of its deep historical roots in Russia's past, including aspects of the Soviet past, and particularly the Great Patriotic War. But at the same time the regime has no interest in acknowledging the past as something "unknown," or as something for which people might mobilize themselves for change. Our discussion will try to unpack this paradox.

              Juhana Aunesluoma (Political History, University of Helsinki): "All Quiet on the Western Front? European Identity, Wold War II and Politics of Remembrance in Western Europe"
              In the 1990s the memory of the Holocaust was introduced under the concept of European cultural heritage. Auschwitz and similar sites were added on EU-managed lists of monuments of European cultural heritage. However, there have also been calls to include places like Dresden as appropriate places of mourning and remembrance, highlighting the suffering of ordinary Germans during the war. While the forms and boundaries of the politics of remembrance in contemporary Europe have been extended to include diverse groups and also victims of Stalinist terror, it has not been easy to integrate the dark shadows of Europe's past in all their complexity into notions of European identity and a common European cultural heritage.


              2:45-3:30
              Afternoon session 2: Politics of New Forms of Commemoration

              Heller Hall 1210

              Rick McCormick (German, Scandinavian and Dutch, University of Minnesota): "From the 'Rubble Film' to the 'Heritage Film' and Beyond: Representations of WWII and the Holocaust in German Cinema"
              The very first post-WWII German film, made in the Soviet zone of Berlin, attempted to deal with Nazi war crimes, but it also focused on a traumatized German soldier as a victim of the Nazis rather than telling the story of the woman in the film who helps to heal him, who is herself a former concentration camp inmate. German attempts to deal with the Nazi past in film on both sides of the Cold War served different political agendas but were mostly silent about the plight of the Jews. In the aftermath of the surprising impact in West Germany of the American miniseries Holocaust in the late 1970s, and later, after German unification, the huge success of Spielberg's film Schindler's List in the early 1990s, things changed. Since the late 1990s the plight of the Jews is almost always thematized in big-budget historical films about WWII made in Germany, but these so-called "heritage" films seem to be marketing a past that is safely sealed off from the present. One recent example is the TV miniseries Generation War (Unsere Muetter, unsere Vaeter), which includes a Jewish character, albeit a not very plausible one, among its protagonists. But this kind of "heritage" narrative is also critiqued by some younger filmmakers.

              Jodi Elowitz: "Creating an Archive for a New Generation: The Holocaust Memory as Illustrated in Animated Short Films"
              Have we reached our limit on the use of the traditional images of the archive in representing the Holocaust in documentary film? How will filmmakers engage the next generation of viewers to invite them to watch narratives of the Holocaust? I believe the answer lies in the use of artistic representation in the form of animated short films. In this presentation I will explore how animation is replacing the use of traditional archival footage in order to create new imagery based on the representation and memory that has been shaped by the limited photographic and film record of the Holocaust.




              3:30-3:45
              Coffee Break

              3:45-4:30
              Afternoon session 3: Empowering the Marginalized

              Heller Hall 1210

              Elaine May (American Studies, University of Minnesota): "Women on the Home Front"
              World War II opened up many new opportunities for women to pursue work and other social, sexual, and public activities that had not been available to them prior to the war. This presentation will open up discussion on the ways in which women's lives changed during the war, and the extent to which those changes carried forward into the postwar era.

              Matti Jutila (Political Science, University of Minnesota): "Diverse Country, Diverse Soldiers, Homogenic War Narrative: Diversifying Finnish WWII History Politics"
              The hegemonic Finnish WWII narrative presents Finnish soldiers as white, Finnish speaking, Christian (Evangelical Lutheran), heterosexual men. Relying on this image, Finnish populist right uses war history in its nationalist, anti-immigration politics. In my presentation I will address the war experiences of Muslim, Jewish, Roma, Russian and gay soldiers in the Finnish armed forces and discuss the potential uses of this history in supporting an inclusive, multicultural society today.



              4:30-4:45
              Concluding remarks

              Heller Hall 1210


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            • A review of "Can One Laugh at Everything? Satire and Free Speech After Charlie"

              On January 29 the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies and the Department of French & Italian as well as several other centers and departments at the University of Minnesota hosted a discussion "Can One Laugh at Everything? Satire and Free Speech After Charlie." Speakers included Anthony Winer (William Mitchell College of Law); William Beeman (Anthropology); Jane Kirtley (Journalism); Bruno Chaouat (French & Italian); and Steven Sack (Editorial Cartoonist, Minneapolis Star Tribune).

              CharlieHebdoEvent.jpg


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              The conversation addressed the topic of free speech after the attacks on the French magazine Charlie Hebdo in early January from a variety of perspectives: comparing U.S. and European legislative contexts, addressing figurative representation in the Islamic tradition, and the rise of anti-Semitism in Europe. Free speech, issues of power, inequality, racism, and hate speech were also brought up. Steven Sack made a case for the simultaneous potency and vulnerability of cartoons as a medium. The organizers noted that this event was intended as a starting point to a larger conversation and hoped that the discussion continues both in classrooms and beyond.
              Initially covered by MPR, press coverage after the event has continued to be strong, particularly regarding controversy over the image used in the flyer to promote the talk in the days and weeks leading up to it. Read about the controversy in Inside Higher Ed, the Washington Post, and the local Star and Tribune.
              Click here for an audio recording of the talks.
              Here for the visuals accompanying Bill Beeman's talk.
              Here for the visuals accompanying Bruno Chaouat's talk.

              photos below courtesy of Steve Foldes (left to right, top to bottom): Anthony Winer, William Beeman, Jane Kirtley, Bruno Chaouat, and Steven Sack.
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            • Final HGMV Workshop of the Year | Ore Koren (Political Science) on Reparations of Mass Killings

              Thursday, May 7, 3:00 pm
              710 Social Sciences
              Ore Koren (Department of Political Science)
              "Exploring the Alternatives: The Role of Customary Justice Mechanisms in Post-Conflict Contexts"

              This paper argues that reparations for mass killing are a rare, diffusive event, and that in order to understand it one must first identify where diffusion can actually occur and then account for factors that might govern the diffusive process. I begin by applying extant theories of international policy diffusion and international law to the study of reparations for mass killing. The viability of this approach is then tested on newly available data on reparations for the years 1971-2011 by incorporating a Bayesian/MCMC hierarchical and spatial split-population framework that accounts for the aforementioned issues.

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              Ore Koren is a PhD candidate at the Department of Political Science and a MSc candidate at the Department of Applied Economics. His fields of research are international relations and research methodology, focusing on political violence, civil conflict, and mass killing.

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            • Armenian Genocide Centennial | CHGS events in commemoration of the 100th anniversary, April 23-25

              Facebook image-2 copy.pngAs we approach the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Human Rights Program and the Institute for Global Studies will be hosting three days of events to commemorate this centennial. The events will include the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Lecture featuring Professor Bedross Der Matossian, which is open to the public (April 23), a student conference, entitled "One Hundred Years of Genocide" (April 24), open to the public, and a K-16 teacher workshop (April 25).

              The objectives of these events are to promote public understanding of the genocide and the fates of those who lost their lives and those who escaped. The events will also analyze responses by the international community, and discuss the long-term implications for international policy and actions to prevent and respond to genocide.

              Thursday, April 23, 7:00pm
              Bedross Der Matossian, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

              "The Armenian Genocide Historiography on the Eve of the Centennial: From Continuity to Contingency"
              Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Humphrey Forum
              open to the public

              Friday, April 24, 8:45am - 5:00pm
              100 Years of Genocide - Student Conference

              Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Room #25
              open to the public

              Saturday, April 25, 8:45am - 3:00pm
              World War I and the Armenian Genocide - Teacher Workshop

              1210 Heller Hall

              Saturday, April 25, 11:00am - 1:00pm
              Guided Tour of Bdote, sacred Dakota site at Ft. Snelling State Park

              led by Professor Iyekiyapiwin Darlene St. Clair

              Events organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Human Rights Program, Institute for Global Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, and Ohanessian Chair. Made possible by the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.

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            • Tour of Bdote, sacred Dakota site at Ft. Snelling State Park

              Saturday, April 25
              11:00am - 1:00pm
              Ft. Snelling State Park


              We are living, learning, and working in a particular place with a long, fascinating, troubling, and frequently unknown story. One goal for this tour is that participants begin to experience the place we live in as Mnisota Makoce, the Dakota Homelands. We will be visiting several Dakota sacred sites located in an area that would later be called the Twin Cities. How has colonization impacted Dakota use and access to these places? How have Dakota people asserted a continuing relationship with these places? This tour will provide participants with a more nuanced and complicated understanding of the place we call home.

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              Iyekiyapiwiƞ Darlene St. Clair is an Associate Professor at Saint Cloud State University where she teaches American Indian Studies and directs the Multicultural Resource Center. Her work focuses on several areas: Dakota Studies, the integration of Native cultures, histories and languages into curricula and educational institutions, and the arts and cultural expressions of Native peoples. She is Bdewakaƞtuƞwaƞ Dakota and an enrolled member of the Lower Sioux Indian Community in Minnesota.



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            • Panel on "Shanghailander" Jewish Refugees

              Thursday, April 23
              9:30 - 11:30am
              Northrop Auditorium

              China Day is an annual half-day event that brings together Minnesota high school students who study Chinese at the University of Minnesota. Keynote speakers include a panel of "Shanghailanders," individuals who lived in Shanghai as Jewish refugees during the Holocaust. Panelist will speak about their life in Shanghai and share with students what Shanghai was like during a critical time in history. The theme coincides with an exhibit that the Confucius Institute will be sponsoring, Jewish Refugees in Shanghai.

              The panel discussion will be facilitated by Alejandro Baer, Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and professor in the Department of Sociology.

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            • Director of Programs on Ethics, Religion, and the Holocaust at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in D.C. to give talk on the Implications of the Holocaust for Multireligious Conversations, April 22

              Luncheon program featuring Victoria Barnett
              Director of Programs on Ethics, Religion, and the Holocaust at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
              Wednesday, April 22, 11:45am
              Mt. Zion Temple, St. Paul
              For reservations: bfriend@stpauljcc.org

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              As the event of the Holocaust recedes further into human history, popular and academic understandings of its implications have grown broader. Today, the history of the Holocaust is often taught comparatively in courses on human rights, ethics, and contemporary genocide. And as we become increasingly aware of the multireligious nature of our world, interfaith conversations focus on the commonalities and tensions between and among people of various religions, not just Judaism and Christianity. How can recent scholarship about the Holocaust inform these newer conversations, and how in turn have these developments shaped the field of Holocaust studies? How can the Holocaust be understood in its historical particularities as well as in terms of more universal questions? Victoria Barnett will discuss these developments and how they are being addressed in the field of Holocaust studies and in interreligious circles.
              For more information see the University of St. Thomas and Saint John's University Jay Phillips Center for Interfaith Learning
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            • Minneapolis Premiere: Video Project from acclaimed Barcelona-born American artist Francesc Torres

              Francesc Torres: What does History Know of Nail Biting?
              Tuesday, April 21
              4:30 - 6:00 pm
              Lindahl Founders Room, Northrop Auditorium
              University of Minnesota

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              What does History Know of Nail Biting? the latest multi-channel video work from acclaimed Barcelona-born American artist Francesc Torres, examines the extraordinary history of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, a group of American volunteers who went to fight for the Republican side during the Spanish Civil War (1936-39), juxtaposing recently recovered archival footage of these soldiers and their battles with recent documentation of the sites of major military encounters.

              Organized by the Iberian Studies Initiative in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese Studies. Co-sponsored by the Institute for Global Studies; the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies; the Institute for Advanced Study; the Departments of Art, Art History, and History; Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, U of M Duluth; and Spanish Discipline, The Division of Humanities, U of M Morris.

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            • Norway and the Holocaust | Special Guest Lecture by Author and Survivor Irene Berman, April 23

              Irene Berman
              "We are going to Pick Potatoes", Norway and the Holocaust, the Untold Story


              Thursday, April 23
              11:15 - 12:30pm
              350 Anderson Hall
              West Bank, University of Minnesota
              open to the public

              Irene-Berman-photo.jpg

              Irene Levin Berman was born and raised in Norway. As a young child in 1942 she escaped to Sweden, a neutral country during World War II, to avoid annihilation. Nazi Germany had invaded Norway and the deportation of two thousand Norwegian Jews had begun. Seven members of her father's immediate family were among the 771 victims who were unable to escape and were murdered in Auschwitz.

              In 2005 Irene was forced to begin to examine the label of being a Holocaust survivor. Her strong dual identity as a Norwegian and a Jew led her to explore previously unopened doors in her mind. "We Are Going to Pick Potatoes" Norway and the Holocaust, The Untold Story is not a narrative of the Holocaust alone, but the remembrances of growing up Jewish in Norway during and after WWII.

              For more information see www.norwayandtheholocaust.com

              This event will meet with Adam Blackler's "History of the Holocaust" course, but is free and open to the public. Please join us.

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            • HGMV Workshop, Thu April 16: Holocaust Commemoration in Turkey and Spain

              Thursday, April 16
              HGMV Workshop

              Yagmur Karakaya and Alejandro Baer:
              "Remembering to Forget? Holocaust Commemoration in Turkey and Spain"


              3:00pm
              710 Social Sciences

              Turkey Holocaust.jpg

              As a consequence of diverse but converging transnational efforts many countries around the world have gradually introduced an annual Holocaust Remembrance Day, celebrated with a state-sponsored memorial ceremony. How do these transnational top-down politics of memory translate into the designated national settings? Does promoting public awareness and remembrance of the Holocaust affect societies' understandings, attitudes and responses towards past and current forms of mass violence and human rights violations? Preliminary findings of two case studies - Turkey and Spain- will be presented.


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              Professor Alejandro Baer is an associate professor at the sociology department and the director of CHGS.
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              Yagmur Karakaya is a PhD student at the sociology department at the University of Minnesota. She is interested in collective memory, popular culture and narratives of history. Yagmur is currently working on her dissertation project on Ottomania, which focuses on the contemporary interest in the Ottoman past in Turkey. She also works with Alejandro Baer on a comparative study of Holocaust remembrance initiatives.
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            • Chinese Scholar to give talk April 13: "Jews in Modern China"

              Xu Xin (Nanjing University, China), "Jews in Modern China"
              Monday, April 13, 5:00pm
              3M Auditorium
              Carlson School of Management
              University of Minnesota
              Register here

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              China's premier Judaic scholar, Xu Xin (徐新) is the Diane and Guilford Glazer Chair Professor of Jewish and Israel Studies and Dean of the Institute of Jewish/Israel Studies at Nanjing University, China. He is President of the China Judaic Studies Association and Editor-in-Chief and a major contributor of the Chinese edition of Encyclopedia Judaica. He is author of Anti-Semitism: How and Why, A History of Western Culture and The Jews of Kaifeng, China: History, Culture, and Religion. He has served as a fellow or visiting scholar at Hebrew Union College, Harvard University, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Bar-Ilan University, and Tel Aviv University.
              This lecture is part of the exhibit, Jewish Refugees in Shanghai (1933-1941), a collaborative community effort to share information about the unique experiences of Jewish refugees in Shanghai during World War II. The cornerstone of this project is a historical exhibit curated by the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum and on display at Sabes JCC and St. Paul JCC. The exhibit has been enhanced with additional stories from four "Shanghailanders" with deep Minnesota connections.
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            • Yehudit Shendar: World-leading expert in Holocaust art and Nazi art plundering at the Weisman on April 14, 2015


              Yehudit Shendar 
               Retired Deputy Director and Senior Art Curator, Yad Vashem
              "The Insatiable Pursuit of Art: Nazi Art Looting - Perpetrators, Victims, Provenance Researchers"

              April 14, 2015
              7:00 pm
              Weisman Art Museum





              In describing the plunder of art by the Third Reich in his book Nazi Looting, Gerald Aalders writes: "Never in history has a collection so great been amassed with so little scruple."

              The massive looting continues to resound in the frequent headlines of the world press, which report on the efforts of Jewish Holocaust victims' heirs to regain possession of the property stolen from their families. In November 2013 a cache of 1400 works of art was seized by the Bavarian internal revenue authorities from the apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of one of four art dealers allowed under the Nazis to trade modern art. Yehudit Shendar, a world leading expert in Holocaust Art and Nazi art plundering, was selected as an appointee to an international task force assigned to research the provenance of these recently-discovered works.

              In her lecture at the Weisman Art Museum, attended by over 180 friends and scholars in the community, Yehudit Shendar shared perspectives, insights and personal accounts of her work in what was coined by Jonathan Petropoulos, a professor of history at Claremont McKenna College, as "The most important discovery of Nazi-looted art since the Allies discovered the hoards in the salt mines and the castles."








              Organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies with support from the Weisman Museum of Art and the Department of Art History. Cosponsored by the Center for Austrian Studies, the Center for German and European Studies, Center for Jewish Studies, and Hillel: The Jewish Student Center.
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            • Call for Nominations: 2015 Human Rights Awards

              2015awards.pngEach spring, the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies celebrate the tremendous work of students in human rights with the Inna Meiman Award and the Sullivan Ballou Award. Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to nominate an undergraduate student who has truly been impressive in their human rights work. Self-nominations are also accepted. The awards will be given out at a luncheon ceremony on Friday, May 8th.

              Applications and Nominations due April 15th at 5pm.

              Letters of nomination (750 words or less) and résumé/CV should be submitted by email to the Human Rights Program hamm0229@umn.edu or delivered to the Human Rights Program office 214 Social Sciences. Self-nominations must include a letter of recommendation.

              For more information please call 612.626.7947 or email hamm0229@umn.edu.

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            • "Intersectional Objects" that bind and divide communities: curating an exhibit of Polish-made figurines depicting Jews

              Erica Lehrer, University of Concordia, Motreal
              Curating Memories in Conflict: New Ethnography in an Old Museum

              Monday, April 20, 2015
              12:00 - 1:30pm
              Weisman Art Museum
              free and open to the public

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              Anthropologist Erica Lehrer will discuss a participatory exhibition of Polish-made figurines depicting Jews that she curated in Kraków's Seweryn Udziela Ethnographic Museum in summer 2013. The exhibit grew out of research for her recent book Jewish Poland Revisited: Heritage Tourism in Unquiet Places (Indiana, 2013). In the broadest terms, the exhibition took up the question of how to deal with painfully disputed subject matter: How can one productively exhibit objects whose existence or the meanings one community promotes are deeply objectionable to another community? Lehrer will discuss Poland's Jewish figurines as "intersectional objects" that both bind and divide communities, and suggest their potential as catalysts for critical memory work that transcends the terms of today's defensive public debate about Poland's Jewish past. She will also address Poland's changing museum landscape as a barometer of a disputed national imaginary.

              Erica Lehrer is an Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in the departments of History and Sociology‑Anthropology at Concordia University, Montreal. She is the author of Jewish Poland Revisited: Heritage Tourism in Unquiet Places, and co‑editor of Jewish Space in Contemporary Poland, and Curating Difficult Knowledge: Violent Pasts in Public Places. As a curator, she produced the 2013 exhibit Souvenir, Talisman, Toy: Poland's Jewish Figurines in Kraków's Seweryn Udziela Ethnographic Museum, and published the accompanying catalog Lucky Jew.

              Co-sponsored by the Institute for Advanced Study, the Department of Anthropology and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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            • Talk on Jewish Heritage Revival in Poland, April 19

              Erica Lehrer, Concordia University, Montreal
              "(Polish) Gentiles Doing Jewish stuff"....and the Jews Who Love/Hate Them"

              Sunday, April 19, 2015
              7:30 - 9:00pm
              Beth Jacob Congregation

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              Jewish heritage revival in Poland is a phenomenon that has attracted a great deal of attention and provoked many controversies. Described as the world's largest Jewish cemetery and the realm of "virtual Jewishness," Poland is a space where the non-Jewish interest in things Jewish has been looked upon with particular scepticism. American cultural anthropologist Erica Lehrer ventures into this territory, both fascinating and fraught with tension, giving a fresh glimpse into the backstage of the Jewish heritage industry.
              Erica Lehrer is an Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in the departments of History and Sociology‑Anthropology at Concordia University, Montreal. She is the author of Jewish Poland Revisited: Heritage Tourism in Unquiet Places, and co‑editor of Jewish Space in Contemporary Poland, and Curating Difficult Knowledge: Violent Pasts in Public Places. As a curator, she produced the 2013 exhibit Souvenir, Talisman, Toy: Poland's Jewish Figurines in Kraków's Seweryn UdLehziela Ethnographic Museum, and published the accompanying catalog Lucky Jew.

              This series is made possible by a generous gift in memory of Julia K. & Harold Segall. Co-sponsored by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, the Department of Anthropology; Beth Jacob Congregation.

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            • International Student Conference, "100 Years of Genocide: Remembrance, Education, Prevention"


              100 Years of Genocide
              International Student Conference

              100 Years of Genocide: Remembrance, Education, Prevention

              University of Minnesota
              Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Room 25
              April 24, 2015


              As 2015 marks the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Human Rights Program, the Institute for Global Studies, and the Ohanessian Chair hosted three days of events to commemorate this centennial. The objectives of these events are to promote public understanding of the genocide and the fates of those who lost their lives and those who escaped. The events also analyze responses by the international community, and discuss the long-term implications for international policy and actions to prevent and respond to genocide.

              The student conference brought together young scholars, graduate and advanced undergraduate students from different disciplines that are working on the Armenian or other episodes of genocide and mass violence.

              Program

              8:45 - 9:15
              Registration


              9:15 - 9:30
              Welcome

              Evelyn Davidheiser, Director, Institute for Global Studies
              Alejandro Baer, Associate Professor in Sociology, and Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

              9:30 - 11:00
              Sesssion 1


              The Armenian Genocide: Survival, Trauma, Resilience

              Professor Bedross Der Matossian, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
              (Moderator)
              Angel Amirjanyan, Yerevan State University (Armenia)
              The Psychological Effects of Genocide
              Peter Kranitz, Pazmany Peter Catholic University (Hungary)
              Survivors, Asylum Seeking and Repatriation: The case of Armenian refugees in Constantinople
              Varduhi Gumruyan, Anania Shirakatsy Lyceum Educational Complex (Armenia)
              Armenian Genocide: Consequences as Posttraumatic Stress


              11:15 - 1:00
              Session 2


              Armenians and Turkey after the Genocide

              Professor Joachim Savelsberg, University of Minnesota
              (Moderator)
              Vahram Ayvazyan (Armenia)
              Turkish Denial and Public Opinion
              Gevorg Petrosyan, National Academy of Sciences, Republic of Armenia
              "Shared Pain": Turkish Government's current steps toward denial of Armenian Genocide
              Torkom Movsesiyan, City College of New York (2009), TORKOMADA, Inc.
              The Armenian Holocaust and International Law

              1:00 - 2:00
              Lunch Break

              2:00 - 3:30
              Session 3


              Responses to Genocide: Justice, Media and Mediations

              Professor Barbara Frey
              , University of Minnesota
              (Moderator)
              Lindsay Blahnik, University of Minnesota
              Transitional Justice and Social Cohesion: effects of punitive and restorative justice on social cohesion following the Rwandan Genocide
              Tom Dunn, Exeter University (U.K.)
              Rethinking British Perceptions of Genocide and Mass Atrocities: The Sierra Leonean Civil War and Britain, 1997-2002
              Rebecca Shnabel, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse
              Traversing Translation: A Reader's Response and Marxist Critique of Elie Wiesel's Un di Velt Hot Geshvign, La Nuit, and Night

              3:45 - 4:45
              Session 4


              The Causes of Genocide and its Prevention
              Professor Alejandro Baer, University of Minnesota
              (Moderator)
              Kayla Nomina, Valparaiso University
              Patterns of the Past: Determining common causal agents of genocide to predict and
              prevent future mass atrocities

              Joe Eggers, University of Minnesota
              Native Americans and Armenians: Exploring nationalism in genocidal violence


              4:45 - 5:00
              Concluding Remarks


              Events organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Human Rights Program, Institute for Global Studies, and Ohanessian Chair. Made possible by the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.

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            • Author event with Peter Grose and his new book on Le Chambon - sur - Lignon in WW II, "A good place to Hide"

              A Good Place to Hide
              Author Event with Peter Grose

              Monday, April 20, 7:00 - 9:00pm
              Free at the St. Paul JCC
              1375 St. Paul Ave.
              St.Paul, MN 55116

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              In a year of increased terrorism and anti-Semitism in France, we invite you to share in the remarkable story of a French village and its neighbors that saved 3500 Jews during WWII. Meet journalist Peter Grose, whose newly published tale of Le Chambon in south-central France is an uplifting account of a community coming together to do what's right.

              This event is free but registration is requested. For more information please contact Beth Friend, Adult Program Coordinator at 651-255-4735

              This program is co-sponsored by Sabes JCC of Minneapolis. Community Partners: Beth Jacob Congregation, Mount Zion Temple, Temple of Aaron.

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            • Professor of Middle East History to deliver Ohanessian Lecture on the Eve of the Centennial of the Armenian Genocide

              As part of CHGS events in commemoration of the centennial of the Armenian Genocide.

              Thursday, April 23, 7:00pm
              Bedross Der Matossian, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
              The Armenian Genocide Historiography on the Eve of the Centennial: From Continuity to Contingency
              Humphrey Forum, Humphrey School of Public Affairs
              open to the public


              One of the outstanding issues in Armenian Genocide historiography has been the inability of historians to come to a consensus regarding the causes, the aim of the perpetrators, and the process of the genocide. This is due to the fact that the field of genocide studies by its nature is contentious. While most Western and some Turkish scholars agree to the fact that the events that happened to the Armenians during World War I constitute genocide, they tend to disagree on critical issues such as the causes, motives, premeditation, and the actual process itself. Over the course of the past two decades, the historiography of the Armenian Genocide has evolved through the introduction of new methodologies, approaches, and more complex analyses of the Genocide that venture beyond rudimentary and essentialist arguments and representations. These approaches range from arguing that religion and/or nationalism were the main factors that led to the Armenian Genocide, to the argument that the genocide was a contingent event that took place during World War I, represented by a rapid radicalization of the government's policy towards the Armenians. This talk will discuss the development of the historiography of the Armenian Genocide by concentrating on some of the major trends in the historiography and assess their contribution to the understanding of the different dimensions of the genocide. Furthermore, it will provide suggestions about strengthening certain areas in the historiography that still remain in their infancy.

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              Bedross Der Matossian is an Assistant Professor of Modern Middle East History in the Department of History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Born and raised in Jerusalem, he is a graduate of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he began his graduate studies in the Department of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies. He completed his Ph.D. in Middle East History in the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University in 2008. From 2008 to 2010, he was a Lecturer of Middle East History in the Faculty of History at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For the Spring quarter 2014 he was appointed as the Dumanian Visiting Professor in the University of Chicago. His areas of interest include ethnic politics in the Middle East, inter-ethnic violence in the Ottoman Empire, the history of the Armenian Genocide and modern Armenian history. In addition to contributing to numerous edited volumes, his articles have also appeared in the Journal of Palestinian Studies, Jerusalem Quarterly, Armenian Review, Majallat al-Dirasat Al-Filastiniyya, European Journal of Turkish Studies, Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal, Journal of the Society for Armenian Studies, Turcica, and Ararat Quarterly. He is the author of Shattered Dreams of Revolution: From Liberty to Violence in the Late Ottoman Empire (Stanford University Press, 2014).



              Organized by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair, Professor Joachim J. Savelsberg.
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            • HGMV workshop on Latin American Media as a Transitional Justice Memory Merchandiser

              FRIDAY, April 3, 12:00 NOON
              Social Sciences 710
              Amy Cosimini
              "Truths Produced and Sold: Latin American Media as a Transitional Justice Memory Merchandiser"

              This project explores the potential of cultural productions to act as supplementary transitional justice mechanism, which (re-) frame how nations remember past human rights abuses. Through a comparative analysis of 21st century cultural production in Argentina and Brazil, it is argued that representative films and television programs are uniquely placed to complement and question institutional memory policies that tend to monumentalize one truth and one past in an attempt to construct a coherent collective memory narrative. Drawing from human rights, media studies and transitional justice scholarship, this project promises to open up a space for a discussion on the constructed nature of memories and the media's intentions as a new structural memory frame.
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              Amy Cosimini is a PhD candidate in the department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies at the University of Minnesota where she researches the relationship between human rights and memory production discourses in Southern Cone literature and popular culture. She previously earned her B.A in Political Science and Latin American Studies at Macalester College and her M.A. in Hispanic Literature and Culture at the University of Minnesota.
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            • WWI and the Armenian Genocide Teacher Workshop, April 25

              As part of CHGS events in commemoration of the centennial of the Armenian Genocide, this day workshop will start with an historical overview of the beginning of World War 1 and be followed by break out sessions on the War in Africa, Asia, and the Armenian Genocide. Participants will be able to choose sessions of interest. Participants will receive lunch, parking, resource lists and a book. Faculty members from the Center of Austrian Studies, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and the Department of History from the University of Minnesota will be leading the sessions.
              Registration is full.

              Saturday, April 25, 8:45am - 3:00pm
              "World War I and the Armenian Genocide" Teacher Workshop
              1210 Heller Hall





              Schedule

              8:45-9:00
              Registration

              9:00-9:15
              Welcome
              Deborah Jane, Outreach Coordinator, Institute for Global Studies
              Gary Cohen, Director of the Center for Austrian Studies
              Alejandro Baer, Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies


              9:15-10:45
              Introductory Session
              The Coming of the War: Lives on the Home Front
              Gary Cohen

              10:45-11:00
              Coffee break

              11:00-12:15
              Concurrent sessions
              The War in the Colonies: Africa (Room 1210)
              Adam Blackler and Patricia Lorcin
              The Armenian Genocide (Room 1219)
              Bedross Der Matossian

              12:15-1:00
              Lunch

              1:00 -2:15
              Concurrent sessions
              The War in the Colonies: India and Southeast Asia (Room 1210)
              Ajay Skaria and Patricia Lorcin
              Minnesotans and the Armenian Genocide: History and Memory (Room 1219)
              Lou Ann Matossian

              2:15-2:30
              Coffee break

              2:30-3:00
              Concluding remarks and resources

              Events organized by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, and Institute for Global Studies. Made possible by the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.


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            • A Review of "Contested Past, Contested Present: Social Memories and Human Rights in Post-Communist Europe"

              An international symposium on "Contested Past, Contested Present: Social Memories and Human Rights in Post-Communist Europe" took place at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities on March 4-6. It was organized by the IAS Collaborative "Reframing Mass Violence", and sponsored by the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, among other supporters.

              The symposium opened with a keynote lecture by Prof. John-Paul Himka, who spoke about the reception of the Holocaust in post-Communist Europe, especially its legacies in Poland and Ukraine. On Thursday and Friday, sessions covered different aspects of contested memories in post-Communist European countries, from depictions in theater, museums, and film, to transitional justice policies, and the current conflict in Ukraine. The symposium also held a session on the Ukraine conflict, where professors John-Paul Himka, George O. Liber and J. Brian Atwood addressed the different aspects of the current events.

              Himka spoke about the role of the regional specifics of Ukraine, and historical differences between them, while Liber addressed Vladimir Putin's response to the Ukrainian Revolution of 2013-2015 and Russia's current aggressive foreign policy in the region. Atwood provided an informative view on the current crisis from a U.S. perspective, based on many years of experience in various state institutions, including USAID. The presentations and ensuing discussions illustrated that the past of post-Communist states remains, indeed, a contested space, negotiating narratives of rising nationalism, victimhood, responsibility, retribution and rehabilitation.
              Overall, the event foregrounded issues of how long a transition lasts, what are ways contested pasts are conceptualized and dealt with, legally, commemoratively, and artistically, and how memories can be and are at times used for political purposes. The symposium also highlighted a need to balance contested memories, interpretations of the past with long-term policies that are not merely cosmetic and mechanistic, but often demand a true reevaluation of a country's history. However, this demands interest and a willingness to do so by the communities in the states themselves. Arguably, the race for EU accession and externally shaped Transitional Justice policies may have resulted in speedy formal establishment of institutions to this effect, but equally seems to have in some instances created a space for hegemonic and reductionist narratives to take hold.
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            • "Shanghailanders" Jewish Refugees in China Exhibit at the Sabes: A Journey of Hope for more than 18,000 Jews

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              Through May 7
              Sabes JCC
              4330 S. Cedar Lake Road, Minneapolis
              Exhibit open Mon-Thu, 7:30am-9:30pm; Fri, 7:30am-6:00pm; and Sun, 8:00am-3:00pm (closed Saturdays).


              Jewish Refugees in Shanghai (1933-1941) is a collaborative community effort to share information about the unique experiences of Jewish refugees in Shanghai during World War II. The cornerstone of this project is a historical exhibit curated by the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum. The exhibit has been enhanced with additional stories from four "Shanghailanders" with deep Minnesota connections.
              See the CHGS website for a narrative of Jewish refugee Susan Muller, who journeyed from Vienna to Shanghai to Toronto.
              Sponsored by: Confucius Institute at the University of Minnesota, Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas, and Sabes JCC.
              Additional support from the Jewish Community Center of the Greater St. Paul Area, and University of Minnesota partners the Center for Jewish Studies, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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            • HGMV Workshop: "An Upheaval of Memory: The Collision of Dutch Resistance Literature and National History"

              Thursday, March 26, 3:00pm
              Social Sciences 710
              Jazmine Contreras
              "An Upheaval of Memory: The Collision of Dutch Resistance Literature and National History"


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              This paper examines the Dutch experience of German occupation during World War II through the use of memoirs. These memoirs, written by individuals with firsthand experiences of the occupation, shed light upon the categories of victim, bystander, and collaborator, which tend to be overemphasized when discussing wartime activity. Part of the paper is dedicated to problematizing these categories, especially when they obfuscate wartime experiences that do not fit neatly within the narratives created by the Dutch government. The second half of the paper, examines the memoirs in the context of government narratives which state that the Dutch were simultaneously heroes and victims during the occupation. Despite the explicit overgeneralization of this narrative, its power over Dutch memory of WWII has not diminished. Within academic circles, historians and social scientists alike have debated how to characterize the efforts of the Dutch population in light of the deportation of a majority of the Jewish population. The government has also shied away from engaging with this reality and the rampant anti-Semitism that took place after liberation.

              Jazmine is a second year PhD student in the History Department at the University of Minnesota. Her work focuses on gender and sexuality in the German-occupied Netherlands during World War II, specifically fraternization between German soldiers and Dutch women.

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            • "Despite The Holocaust: Rebuilding Jewish Life In Germany After 1945"

              Please join us for Andrea Sinn's talk "Despite The Holocaust: Rebuilding Jewish Life In Germany After 1945."

              She will discuss the experiences of Jewish communities in postwar Germany and the process of redefining Jewish existence in "the land of the perpetrators." The competing and conflicting German, Jewish, and international conceptions of Jewish life in Germany that were voiced during the early postwar years play an important role in understanding the development of individual Jewish communities in the Federal Republic and the position that German-Jewish organizations occupy within Germany and the Jewish community in Europe today.

              Despite The Holocaust: Rebuilding Jewish Life In Germany After 1945
              Wednesday, March 25 at 5:00 pm
              135 Nicholson Hall


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              Andrea Sinn is the DAAD Professor of German & History at the University of California at Berkeley. Her research and teaching focus on modern European history especially German, Jewish, and migration history. She has published widely on German-Jewish experiences during the Nazi-Dictatorship, personal and collective challenges of exile and return, as well as the rebuilding of Jewish life in the Federal Republic of Germany.

              Sponsors:
              Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch
              Center for Jewish Studies
              Center for German & European Studies

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            • April 10, "A Usable Body: Coaxing the Body Into and Out of Captivity at Black History Museums"

              Friday, April 10
              12:15 PM - 1:30 PM
              1114 Social Sciences
              *Free*
              RSVP REQUIRED to marydrew@umn.edu

              Sociology Workshop Series Presents:

              Robyn Autry, Wesleyan University
              "A Usable Body: Coaxing the Body Into and Out of Captivity at Black History Museums"


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              The visual logic of 'black' identity as a social and historical fact is visible at museum exhibitions depicting the transformation of enslaved Africans to racial citizens. In particular, Professor Autry will focus on the work of the body in narrating this transition at the first black history museum: the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan. She identifies two types of body work: that of the historical object on display - the captive African and the US citizen - along with that of the visitor moving through the physical space of the museum. In the first instance, she considers the visual treatment of the enslaved body in captivity as broken, bowed, beaten and often nude in contrast to the post-abolition period when the body is positioned as erect, individuated, self-possessed and always clothed (even as its body ironically disappears in the process of becoming a subject). During both periods, normative presentations of the body mimic the moral underpinnings of black history as a site of knowledge production and identity.
              Building on this, Professor Autry considers how the visitor's body is oriented both to the narratives on display and to the built environment of the museum itself. Just as the transition from slavery to citizenship is materialized through images of poised, able bodies, she argues that the museum works to construct visitors as similarly poised and able-bodied subjects. These problematic around subject-object relations illustrate that spectatorship cannot be divorced from the racialized imagination that produces and then privileges certain forms of embodied subjecthood over others.
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            • On view at the WAM: Selections from the Struggle series by artist raised in Hungary in WWII

              Selections from the Struggle series
              SATURDAY, FEB 14 2015 - SUNDAY, MAR 22 2015
              Weisman Art Museum

              Peter Dallos: Selections from The Struggle series is concerned with two elemental conflicts that affect humankind: one struggle is the tension between Western civilization and the forces of nihilism and anarchy, the other is environmental destruction versus the reaction of the wounded earth.

              Peter Dallos's early work (the War series) was autobiographical, mostly concerning his World War II experiences as a child during the German occupation, the bombardment and siege of Budapest, and the Holocaust. The entire War series is in the permanent collection of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

              NL_Spring15_dallos.jpg

              Dallos is a self-taught artist and John Evans Professor Emeritus of Neuroscience at Northwestern University. As a young teenager, he studied painting in Budapest with György Kádár, one of Hungary's foremost artists. He also learned there the machining and tool and die-making skills that form the mechanical foundation of these works.
              Dallos's adolescence was spent under the Hungarian fascist regime and later under the Soviet occupation. He escaped and immigrated to the United States after the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.
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            • International Symposium: Social Memories and Human Rights in Post-Communist Europe (March 4-6)

              The international symposium coordinated by the IAS collaborative, Reframing Mass Violence, examined the dynamics of public remembrance in post-communist Europe. The keynote address was by John-Paul Himka, Professor of History and Classics, University of Alberta. In case you missed it, or would like to review, links to videos below.

              March 4, Wednesday
              Keynote Address: "Bringing the Dark Past to Light:
              The Reception of the Holocaust in Post-Communist Europe"

              John-Paul Himka
              7:30 p.m.
              Best Buy Theater, Northrop
              Welcome: Barbara Frey (Co-Chair of IAS Collaborative)
              Introduction: Evelyn Davidheiser (University of Minnesota)


              Despite the Holocaust's profound impact on the history of Eastern Europe, the communist regimes successfully repressed public discourse about and memory of this tragedy. Since the collapse of communism in 1989, however, this has changed. Professor Himka discusses recent political, social, and cultural developments that have facilitated a more nuanced and complex understanding of the continuities and discontinuities in representations of the Holocaust and the role that memory plays in contemporary discussions of national identity in Eastern Europe.

              March 5, Thursday
              Location: 1210 Heller Hall, 271 19th Avenue S, Minneapolis


              9:00 - 9:30 AM
              Welcome and Introductory Remarks
              CLA Dean John Coleman
              Alejandro Baer (Co-Chair of IAS Collaborative)

              9:30 - 11:30 AM
              Session 1: Competing Images of the Past: Stalinism vs. Nazism
              Lars Breuer (Free University of Berlin): "Victimhood in Vernacular Memory in Germany and Poland"
              Matti Jutila (University of Minnesota): "Constructing Genocidal Marxism in Post-Communist Europe"
              Respondent: Alejandro Baer (University of Minnesota)

              1:30 - 3:30 PM
              Session 2: Accounting for the Past: Truth and Justice in the former Yugoslavia
              Sarah Wagner (George Washington University): "Recognizing Srebrenica's Missing: The Sociopolitics of Forensic Intervention"
              Jelena Subotic (Georgia State University): "The Mythologizing of Communist Violence"
              Thomas C. Wolfe (University of Minnesota): "History, Truth, and Method: Comments on Forensics and Justice"
              Respondent: Barbara Frey (University of Minnesota)
              4:00 - 5:45 PM
              Session 3: The Ukraine Conflict: Contested Past, Contested Present
              An IAS "Thursdays at Four" event
              John-Paul Himka (University of Alberta): "The History behind the Regional Conflict in Ukraine"
              George O. Liber (University of Alabama - Birmingham): "The Ukrainian Revolution of 2013-2015 and the Russian Response."
              J. Brian Atwood (University of Minnesota): "The US perspective on the Regional Conflict."
              Respondent: Mary Curtin (University of Minnesota)
              March 6, Friday
              Location: 1210 Heller Hall, 271 19th Avenue S, Minneapolis

              9:00 - 11:00 AM
              Session 4: Law and Memory in Transition
              Ryan Moltz (University of Minnesota): "Lustration in the Former Yugoslavia"
              Adam Czarnota (IISL, Spain): "Law as Mnemosyne Married with Lethe: Quasi-judicial institutions and collective memories"
              Nadya Nedelsky (Macalester College): "The Struggle for the Memory of the Nation: Slovakia's Confrontation with its Competing Pasts"
              Respondent: Joachim Savelsberg (Co-Chair of IAS Collaborative)
              11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
              Session 5: The Arts and the Politics of Representation
              Michal Kobialka (University of Minnesota): "Of Contested Pasts and Contested Presents: Tadeusz Kantor's Theatre and the Politics of Representation"
              Margarita Kompelmakher (University of Minnesota): "Universality from the Margin? Performing the Explicit Body in the Belarus Free Theater's Trash Cuisine"
              Respondent: James Dawes (Macalester College)
              Sponsored by the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Cosponsored by the Institute for Advanced Study, the Institute for Global Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, Department of Political Science, Department of History, Center for Jewish Studies, European Studies Consortium and the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies of the Minneapolis Foundation.
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            • Violent Action and Body Knowledge: A Sociological Perspective on Torture

              "Violent Action and Body Knowledge:
              A Sociological Perspective on Torture"

              Tuesday, March 10, 4pm
              1114 Social Sciences
              CHGS Lecture, co-sponsored with the Department of Sociology and the Human Rights Program


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              Katharina Inhetveen
              Sociology Chair, Siegen University, Germany



              The lecture will explore torture, as a case of systematized violent action, using analytical instruments informed by the sociology of the body and the sociology of knowledge. The focus is on relations between torture practices and body knowledge. It is argued that the differences as well as the similarities between specific cases of torture, treated in a comparative perspective, can be better understood by taking into account not only the actual torture practices themselves, but also their interconnectedness with body knowledge and body images as socio-cultural constructions. Professor Inhetveen will discuss how violent action and body knowledge mutually influence, shape and reshape each other.

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            • HGMV Workshop

              Thursday, March 12
              3:00pm
              710 Social Sciences
              Orry Klainman (Department of History)
              "Jewish DP Immigration Desires after World War II"

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              Orry Klainman is a Ph.D. student in the History Department at the University of Minnesota. Previously he completed a master's degree in Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Chicago. His work focuses on the intellectual and cultural history of the modern Middle East with a particular emphasis on moments of popular violence and insurgency.

              The larger project of Klainman's M.A. thesis was concerned with the strength and application of Zionist rhetoric focused on European Jewish immigration to Palestine. While researching this subject Klainman came across an archive of interviews conducted by a psychology professor from Chicago's Illinois Institute of Technology named David Boder. In 1946, Boder interviewed 118 people, most of them Jewish "displaced persons," making him arguably the first person to record oral histories from Jewish survivors. In going through Boder's interviews, Klainman recorded important information from each one and ended up with some interesting data. Klainman will share information about the immigration desires of displaced Jews after World War II.


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            • Amber Michel to present at first HGMV workshop of the spring semester

              "American Islamic Organizations: Response Narrative to Counterterrorism Initiatives."
              Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies Interdisciplinary Graduate workshop
              Thursday, February 5
              3:00 P.M.
              Room 710 Social Sciences

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              Amber Michel is a graduate student in the interdisciplinary Master of Liberal Studies program at the University of Minnesota. Her current research examines how counterterrorism initiatives impact Muslim organizations in America. Ms. Michel is especially interested in how the pressure of policing destabilizes Islamic civil society in the US. She works extensively with local Muslim communities on issues of civil rights, law enforcement and discrimination.



              The workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process, and to engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
              For more information please contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
              Schedule for 2015: HGMVWorkshopSpring2015Dates-2 (1).pdf
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            • Next HGMV Workshop: Erma Nezirevic

              Thursday, February 26, 3pm
              710 Social Sciences
              Erma Nezirevic: "Spain Interrupted: Examining Spanish Representations of Violence in the Former Yugoslavia"

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              Erma Nezirevic is a Ph.D. candidate in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities. She specializes in 20th and 21st century Iberian literatures and cultures. Her dissertation studies the way Spain evokes the Balkan Wars of the 1990s in literature and other cultural production such as photography, and how in turn that provides a political, social and cultural understanding of Spain itself. Erma currently works in affiliation with the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, where she coordinates the HGMV Workshop.



              The workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process, and to engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
              For more information please contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
              Schedule for 2015: HGMVWorkshopSpring2015Dates-2 (1).
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            • Bearing Witness 70 Years after the Liberation of Auschwitz

              Featuring Artist Felix de la Concha's
              "Portraits and Conversations with Survivors of the Shoah"
              A multi-media art project that delves into the act of bearing witness
              5:00p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
              Weisman Art Museum
              Monday, January 26, 2015

              Free and open to the public reservations required
              Please make your reservations by clicking here or calling the event line at
              612-424-3624. Parking available in the Weisman Art Musem garage.

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              The Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies and its campus and community partners invite you to a special evening of events to mark the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.


              CHGS will unveil the eight Minnesotan portraits of the forty overall paintings done for the "Portraits & Conversations with Survivors of the Shoah" project we coordinated with artist Felix de la Concha. The evening will also include a reception, remarks from Steve Hunegs, Executive Director, Jewish Community Relations Council, a talk from Auschwitz survivor Dora Zaidenweber, and an interview and Q&A with Felix de la Concha conducted by Professor Leslie Morris, Department of German, Scandinavian and Dutch.
              "Portraits& Conversations" was conceived by De la Concha, in 2007 when he began to paint portraits of Holocaust survivors from all over the world. While posing, the survivors talked about their lives and shared their testimonies of survival. These intimate sessions were recorded so we can see the transformation from a blank canvas to a finished piece. In February of 2013 eight Holocaust survivors who reside in Minnesota participated in the project. There are now 40 completed portraits available to view in the virtual museum on the CHGS website. In addition to the paintings, CHGS also has the video and audio recordings of the sessions, which are on our YouTube channel.
              This project was made possible in part with the support of Rimon: The Minnesota Jewish Arts Council, an initiative of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation and the Wexler Special Events Fund for Holocaust & Genocide Studies.
              University of Minnesota partners: The Institute for Global Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies, the Center for German and European Studies, the Center for Austrian Studies, Department of Art History, the Department of History, the Department of German, Scandinavian & Dutch, the Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Department of Sociology, Department of French & Italian, the Human Rights Program, the European Studies Consortium, Minnesota Hillel.
              Community: The Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas (JCRC), Children of Holocaust Survivors Association in Minnesota (CHAIM), Center for Holocaust & Genocide Education, St. Cloud State University.
              CHGS_Poster_1218f.pdf
              (Event covered by MPR)
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            • New Topics course on 100th Anniversary of Armenian Genocide announced for Spring 2015

              The Armenian Genocide: Disrupted History, Fractured Identities
              Global Studies 5900-Sec. 003
              Bi-weekly: Thursday's 1:30 to 3:00 p.m.
              1 credit advanced seminar
              Dr. Artyom H. Tonoyan, Baylor University

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              The course will explore the socio-historical dimensions of the Armenian Genocide and the contemporary effects of its denial on Armenian and Turkish societies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the rise of Turkish nationalism, the structure of the Armenian Genocide, particularly its social and ideological components, and the efforts to deal with the fallout of the extermination of the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire.


              A Native of Armenia, Dr. Artyom H. Tonoyan received his Ph.D. from
              Baylor University in 2012, where he completed his dissertation on the religious aspects of the conflict in Nagorno Karabakh. Additionally he taught ethno-political conflicts and international human rights at Baylor University before relocating to Minneapolis. His current research includes the politics of the memory of the Armenian Genocide, religion and nationalism in the Caucasus, and the de-secularization of contemporary Russian politics.
              Sponsored by the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies and the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair
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            • 100 Years of Genocide: Student Conference Call for Papers

              As we approach the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Human Rights Program and the Institute for Global Studies will be hosting three days of events to commemorate this centennial. The events will include the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Lecture featuring Professor Bedros Der Matossian, which is open to the public (April 23), a student conference, entitled "One Hundred Years of Genocide" (April 24) and a K-16 teacher workshop (April 25). The objectives of these events are to promote public understanding of the genocide and the fates of those who lost their lives and those who escaped. The events will also analyze responses by the international community (and/or lack thereof), and discuss the long-term implications for international policy and actions to prevent and respond to genocide. In addition to these events the Armenian Community of Minnesota will also be commemorating the genocide with there own special programming.

              The student conference seeks to bring together graduate and advanced undergraduate students from different disciplines that are working on the Armenian or other episodes of genocide and mass violence.To this end, we are seeking a broad range of papers that examine but are not limited to the following topics:
              The Armenian Genocide: Historical and socio-political paths leading to the genocide; the role of the international community, testimonials of survivors; public memory; etc.
              Genocide and the international community: Intervention or lack thereof in genocides and large-scale political violence; potential responses to genocide and mass violence; the role of neighboring countries, and other countries.
              Genocide and the media: International and local media coverage of genocide; hate media and genocide incitement; representations of mass violence and its (cognitive and ethical) limits; representations in popular media such as movies, documentaries, music etc.
              Representing mass atrocity before Lemkin: the Armenian genocide has been referred to as a Crime with no name because it occurred before the Genocide Convention. How does this fact affect how we understand and talk about mass atrocities that occurred before December 9th 1948, including the Armenian genocide?
              Genocide Awareness and Advocacy in the Age of Digital Communications: Social media campaigns to promote awareness and response, traditional vs. new technology platforms to document genocide and mass violence, affect organization and mobilization of citizens, etc.
              Justice and politics of reconciliation after genocide: The role and effectiveness of judicial processes and transitional justice mechanisms such as International Tribunals, truth commissions and reparations.
              Genocide education and public memory: Teaching about genocide and mass atrocities; the representation of the Armenian genocide in history and other textbooks. Memorials, museums and commemoration days/weeks; the politics of commemoration; the use of human remains in memorials and related issues.
              Abstracts not exceeding 300 words and a 2 page CV should be sent to Wahutu j. Siguru Siguru@umn.edu by the 15th of January 2015.
              The conference was made possible by funding from the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies at The Minneapolis Foundation and is sponsored by The Institute for Global Studies, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair, and the Human Rights Program at the University of Minnesota.
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            • Twin Cities Premier of Watchers of the Sky

              Tuesday, December 9
              7:00-9:00 pm
              William Mitchell College of Law
              Presented by World Without Genocide

              MV5BMzIyMDY4NzEwOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMDU0MDM3MjE@._V1_SY317_CR2,0,214,317_AL_.jpg

              Open to the public, no reservations necessary. $10 general public, $5 students and seniors. Free to Mitchell students.
              $35 2 standard CLE credits, $35 2 POST credits, 2 educator clock hours.

              Watchers of the Sky interweaves four stories of remarkable courage, compassion, and determination, while setting out to uncover the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin - the man who created the word "genocide," and believed the law could protect the world from mass atrocities. Inspired by Samantha Power's Pulitzer Prize-winning book, A Problem From Hell, Watchers of the Sky takes you on a provocative journey from Nuremberg to The Hague, from Bosnia to Darfur, from criminality to justice, and from apathy to action.
              Watch the trailer by clicking here.
              Co-sponsors: The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Human Rights Program, University of Minnesota State Bar Association Human Rights Committee,
              Congregation Shir Tikvah, Minneapolis; Mt. Zion Temple, St. Paul, United Nations Association of Minnesota; and William Mitchell College of Law.
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            • "Genocide in El Salvador: Where Ethnicity and Politics Collided"

              Paula Cuellar Cuellar, Department of History and Badzin Fellow in Holocaust and Genocide Studies
              HGMV Workshop
              Friday, December 5
              12:00p.m.
              Room 710 Social Sciences Building

              SAn SAlvador, El Salvador 82_resized.jpg

              The HGMV workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process, and to engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
              For more information contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
              (Continue Reading)
            • Bystanders, Rescuers or Perpetrators? The Neutrals and the Shoah-Facts, Myths and Counter Myths Conference in Madrid, Spain

              The international conference will be held at Centro Sefarad-Israel in Madrid, Spain on November 24 and 26 and will aim at addressing the following issues: The neutral countries' reactions to Nazi anti-Jewish policies and their own policies on Jewish refugees;Their response to the German ultimatum of 1943 to either repatriate Jews with citizenship from their respective countries who lived in Nazi-occupied Europe or to allow their deportation;The genesis and long-lasting effects of "rescue myths", the current state of the discussion regarding the neutral countries' positions during the Holocaust;The dealing with the history of the Jewish persecution in state fact-finding commissions and committees of historians;Approaches to Holocaust education in neutral countries.Holocaust public memory (ceremonies, memorials, museums) and memory politics in neutral countries.



              The conference will aim at addressing the following issues:
              CHGS director Alejandro Baer will introduce "The Politics of Rescue Myths. Lessons from Spain." on the panel "Rescue Myth, Public Debates, Historical Investigations."
              This conference is supported by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) and sponsored by Centro Sefarad Israel - Madrid; Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies- University of Minnesota; Mémorial de la Shoah - Paris; History Unit of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland - Berne; Topography of Terror Foundation - Berlin; Living History Forum - Stockholm; Memoshoá/Association for the Education and Remembrance of the Holocaust - Lisbon and Tarih Vakfı/History Foundation - Istanbul.
              PROGRAMME CONFERENCE ON NEUTRALS - MADRID NOV 2014 - 1610.pdf
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            • Surviving Forced Disappearance: Identity and Meaning

              A Conversation with Gabriel Gatti (Prof. of Sociology, University of the Basque Country)
              Thursday, November 20
              3:00p.m.
              Room 710 Social Sciences
              (Spanish with translation)

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              Due in large part to humanitarian law and transitional justice, the categories of detained-disappeared and forced disappearance are today well established - so much so that in some places like Argentina and Uruguay an intense social life has taken shape around them and in their wake. Victims mix with institutions, laws, and professionals (forensic anthropologists, social scientists, jurists, psychologists, artists, archivists, writers), occupying intersecting positions and doing so with varied narratives, from the epic and heroic to the tragic and traumatic. Based on extensive fieldwork in Argentina and Uruguay, Gatti analyzes these worlds in an attempt to understand how one inhabits the categories that international law has constructed to mark, judge, think about, and repair horror.
              Gabriel Gatti is Professor of Sociology at the University of the Basque Country, Spain. His research and teaching focus on contemporary forms of identity, in particular those constituted in situations of social catastrophe, rupture, and fracture. He is the author of Identidades débiles, Identidades desaparecidas, Les nouveaux répères de l'identité collective en Europe, and Basque society. His latest work, Surviving Forced Disappearance in Argentina and Uruguay: Identity and Meaning was published in august of 2014. He is also a main researcher behind the Mundo(s) de victimas (World(s) of victims) a study of four cases that deal with the construction of the "victim" category in contemporary Spain.
              Professor Gatti's visit is part of the Reframing Mass Violence Collaborative Series. Sponsored by the Institute for Advanced Studies, The Human Rights Program, the Department of Sociology and CHGS.
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            • 2013-2014 Annual Report available online

              The CHGS annual report is now available in PDF on our website. The report includes highlights of programs, events and articles that took place in the last year. To directly view the report click here.

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            • Humanizing Narco Violence in Mexico

              Professor Patrick McNamara
              HGMV Workshop
              Thursday, November 13
              3:00p.m.
              Room 710
              Social Sciences Building

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              Professor McNamara will provide workshop participants with small pieces he has written regarding his attempt to understand human rights violations in Mexico from the perspective of the perpetrators. The essay introduces ideas of memory formation and violence within the field of cognitive studies. He will speak briefly about psychological studies dealing with evil and violence and about the particular groups he has studied most in Mexico, La Familia Michoacana and Los Templarios Caballeros.

              Photo: Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images 2-16-2012

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            • Give to the Max Day is November 13, 2014

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              Be a light for the U's Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies on Give to the Max Day.
              Make a gift at http://z.umn.edu/givechgs.


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            • The genocide of the Herero people in Namibia and the case for reparations

              A special lecture by Ester Utjiua Muinjangue MA
              Lecturer in Social Work at the University of Namibia, and Chair, Ovaherero Genocide Committee, Namibia

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              Presented by the University of Minnesota School of Social Work
              Monday, November 10, 2014
              5:30 - 7:30
              Room 5, Peters Hall
              School of Social Work
              Light dinner served at 5:30, Presentation begins at 6:00
              1.5 FREE CEUS
              RSVP to elightfo@umn.edu

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            • From "Racial Paradise" to the Racist Anti-racism of Frente Negra Brasileira

              Satty Flaherty-Echeverría, Ph.D Candidate, Spanish and Portuguese Studies
              HGMV Workshop
              Thursday, October 30, 3:00p.m. Room 710 Social Sciences Building

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              Due to the late abolition of slavery in Brazil, in 1888, the emancipatory movements that emerged in the first decades of the twentieth century lacked the strength and the language to fight effectively for racial equality. A case in point is the Frente Negra Brasileira (FNB) [Brazilian Black Front], founded in 1931 and outlawed in 1937 by Getúlio Vargas' regime. The FNB had as its main purpose the "political and social union of the National Black People, to affirm their historical rights, in virtue of their material
              and moral activity in the past and for the revindication of their social and political rights under Brazilian communion."
              In this presentation, Flaherty-Echeverria will explore the possible reasons due to which the FNB failed to achieve its political goals. She will concentrate on identifying and analyzing what Celia M. Azevedo calls the "voice from within"1 that obstructed the Afro-centric imagination of Brazilian intellectuals of the time. Those intellectuals embraced the idea that Brazil was a "racial paradise" and, hence, an exceptional case when compared to race relations in the US.
              Satty Flaherty-Echeverria is a Ph.D student in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies at the University of Minnesota writing her dissertation on the recovery of the construction of a Black experience expressed at the margins: in the Portuguese and Spanish languages. Focusing on the poetic and prose articulations connecting African and African diasporic intellectuals across the Atlantic, particularly in Portugal, Brazil and Cuba during the two world wars, who created a network mainly based on periodical publications and translations where their creative and critical work intersected and challenged the mainstream paradigms of Pan-Africanism and Negritude though remaining outside of the debate due to the language in which they were writing."
              The HGMV workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process, and to engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
              For more information contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
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            • Just A War Theory? American Public Attitudes on Proportionality and Distinction

              A Lecture by Benjamin Valentino
              Monday, November 3
              1:30 p.m.
              ROOM CHANGE
              50B Humphrey School of Public Affairs

              Dr. Benjamin Valentino is an Associate Professor of Government at Dartmouth College. His research interests include the causes and consequences of violent conflict and American foreign and security policies, and the causes and prevention of genocide.

              His book Final Solutions: Mass Killing and Genocide in the 20th Century won the Edgar S. Furniss Book Prize for an exceptional contribution to the study of national and international security. His work appeared in outlets such as The American Political Science Review, International Organization, The Journal of Politics, Security Studies, and World Politics, as well as The New York Times and Foreign Affairs.
              Sponsored by: the Minnesota International Relations Colloquium, the Comparative Politics Colloquium, and the Center of Holocaust & Genocide Studies
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            • Re/Imagining PTSD: Toward a Cripistemology of Trauma

              Angela Carter, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
              HGMV Workshop
              Thursday, October 16, 3:00p.m. Room 710 Social Sciences Building

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              From news coverage to television dramas, American culture is saturated with representations of trauma. Moreover, global politics and economic policies all but ensure a future where a life structured by catastrophe can be expected.


              Carter deconstructs the ubiquity of trauma discourse, arguing for a cripistemology of trauma as a way to reconceptualize PTSD in our neoliberal landscape. Whereas theorists such as Lauren Berlant have recently rejected trauma as an analytic framework - since, as it's argued, psychic catastrophe is something we'll all experience if we live long enough - she proposes a crip approach to trauma as a crucial lens into how suffering and "crisis ordinariness" are unevenly distributed, and dissimilarly experienced, among neoliberal subjects. By cripping PTSD, it becomes possible to reimagine an approach to suffering that makes life more livable.
              Gesturing toward a larger dissertation project, she will outline three sites of inquiry within contemporary discourses of PTSD. First exploring how the post-9/11 framing of certain traumatized subjects as ideal citizen-patriots forcefully erases those that cannot be interpolated into rhetorics of U.S. exceptionalism. Secondly, examining how dominant methods of "curing" PTSD illuminate similar neoliberal undertones. Lastly, drawing on anti-psychology theorizing, offering beginning thoughts toward reimaging PTSD as an alternative, and queer, affective and temporal structure. In doing so, this paper proposes a crip way of understanding trauma - one that finds its political imperative in the pervasiveness of the discourse, and demands a theorization that imagines otherwise.
              Angela Carter is a fifth year Ph.D Student in Feminist Studies. She came to the U after becoming a Ronald E. McNair Scholar at Truman State University, and the first person in her family to graduate from college. Her academic interests include: trauma theory, disability studies, queer theory, ethnography, and critical pedagogy. Broadly speaking, her dissertation work examines the intersections of contemporary feminist praxis and critical disability studies within the academy.
              The HGMV workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory. Support fellow scholars and provide feedback at various stages of the research process, and to engage in dialogue with invited scholars.
              For more information contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
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            • Post-graduate Symposium on Occupation, Transitional Justice and Gender

              Call for Papers and Posters
              The Transitional Justice Institute (University of Ulster) and the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (University of Ulster) invite proposals for a one-day postgraduate symposium on Occupation, Transitional Justice and Gender to be held on Friday, 8 May 2015.

              This symposium seeks to explore the interface between occupation, transitional justice and gender. The starting point for exploration is based in feminist concerns that are broadly focused on issues of power, control and hierarchies. More specifically, feminist theorizing acknowledges that women's needs during times of occupation, conflict, and/or transition are often ignored, sidelined or essentialised; recent research is also looking into masculinities during these periods. While much research has explored transitional justice and gender, there has been limited research on the relationship and complexities of occupation and gender.
              Furthermore, there is a dearth of research on how these three concepts intersect, inform and/or impact each other. Some questions to be explored during the symposium may include:
              What might be the approach in exploring the interface between occupation and transitional justice while utilizing a gendered lens?
              How does law capture modern instances of occupation that do not fit neatly into the existing legal coding?
              Can transitional justice mechanisms be employed while there is an occupation and can such mechanisms take the gendered needs of the population into account?
              Can the exceptionality of occupation reveal gender differences unapparent in normal settings and, if so, what are their implications for transitional justice theory and praxis?
              We invite papers from postgraduate students (PhD and Masters) who are exploring the above-mentioned questions in any context and any time period; case studies and theoretical papers are also welcomed. We also invite poster proposals to be featured during a special poster session. For paper or poster proposals, please send a title, a 200-word abstract, and a short one-paragraph biography by 31 December 2014 to Rimona Afana (afana-r@email.ulster.ac.uk) and Stephanie Chaban (chaban-s@email.ulster.ac.uk). Acceptance of abstracts will be notified by 15 January 2015.
              All submissions will be eligible for Best Paper and Best Poster awards. Papers will get substantive and thorough feedback from faculty with expertise in gender/transition and/or law of armed conflict. The organizers are exploring the possibility of publication for the best papers. The symposium will feature Professor Christine Chinkin, Professor of International Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science, as the keynote speaker. Gender experts from the Transitional Justice Institute and IRiSS will also participate. Furthermore, there will also be a praxis session involving domestic and international work related to women's grassroots involvement in transitional justice mechanisms. The full schedule will be announced shortly.
              While there is no registration fee, we regret that we are unable to cover travel and accommodation costs for participants.
              The symposium is sponsored by the Feminist & Women's Studies Association (FWSA): http://fwsablog.org.uk/
              Further sponsorship is provided by the Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster, the Research Graduate School, University of Ulster, and the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, University of Ulster.
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            • The Aleph-bet as an Ontological Basis of Ethics?

              Classical Rhetorics, Technical Communication, the Holocaust, and the Object Beyond
              A conversation with Steven Katz, the R. Roy and Marnie Pearce Professor of Professional Communication, and Professor of English, at Clemson University.
              Wednesday, October 22
              125 Nolte Center
              11:30 a.m.
              Presented by the Department of Writing Studies

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              This presentation will entail discussions of rhetoric, Judaism, and philosophies of language and reality. Revisiting what he had considered to be a primary ethical problem rooted in classical Greek and Roman rhetoric, what he called "the ethic of expediency" first formalized in Aristotle's Rhetoric, Dr. Katz will touch on the apparent manifestation of this ethic in technical communication, and whether and to what degree the ethic of expediency was a major operant in the Holocaust.

              Picking up the Jewish theme, Dr. Katz will summarize an ancient philosophy of the Hebrew aleph-bet, and briefly compare this philosophy to that of classical Greek rhetoric; he will argue, as he has done in publication, that this philosophy of the Hebrew aleph-bet seems to represent a somewhat unique strand of classical rhetoric. Dr. Katz will suggest ways this Jewish sophistic relates to technical communication, and how the rhetoric of the aleph-bet may harbor or at least hint at an ontological antidote to the ethic of expediency.

              In the conclusion of his presentation, Dr. Katz will speculate about the epistemological implications of this orthographic ontology for mystical, magical, empirical, social-epistemic, deconstructive, object-oriented, and digital philosophies of communication and reality in a post-human age.

              Lunch will follow this special event. Please RSVP to Kate Gobel (kdgobel@umn.edu.)
              This lecture is sponsored by Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, The Center for Jewish Studies and the Department of English.
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            • CHGS co-sponsoring 2 films at the Twin Cities Jewish Film Festival

              CHGS will co-sponsor The German Friend and 24 Days at the 2014 Twin Cities Jewish Film Festival on November first and second, both screenings will be at the Sabes Jewish Community Center.

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              The German Friend (Der Deutsche Freund)
              Saturday, November 1
              7:30 p.m.
              Sabes Jewish Community Center
              Tickets: $10 in advance; $14 same day
              For more information or to purchase tickets click here.
              The German Friend is the story of a German-Jewish girl and the son of an exiled Nazi form an enduring bond in Argentina. Through 30 years of personal and political postwar history, the film delivers an intimate examination of a guilt-ridden generation seeking to escape the legacy of their forbearers. Director Jeanine Meerapfel tells a story of a deep love in a time of political upheaval and historical change.
              Directed by Jeanine Meerapfel; Argentina, Germany; 2012; German and Spanish with English subtitles; Adult, Nudity
              24 Days (24 Jours: La Verite sur l'affaire Ilan Halimi)
              November 2
              4:00p.m.
              Discussion to follow screening
              Sabes Jewish Community Center
              Tickets: $10 in advance; $14 same day
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              Sticking dangerously close to the real-life incident that inspired it, 24 Days offers up a white-knuckle dramatization of the nearly month-long kidnapping and torture of 23-year-old Ilan Halimi, whose traumatic ordeal at the hands of the "Gang of Barbarians" prompted a massive police manhunt and, eventually, a national outcry against anti-Semitism in France.
              Directed by Alexandre Arcady; France; 2014; English Subtitles; Mature Audiences, Content; 110 min
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            • AGMI ANNOUNCES 2015 LEMKIN SCHOLARSHIP FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS

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              The Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute announces 2015 LEMKIN SCHOLARSHIP program for foreign students and PhD candidates. Raphael Lemkin scholarship is intended to enable foreign students, who specialize in genocide studies, especially in the Armenian Genocide, to visit Armenia for a month to conduct research in local scientific institutions and libraries.



              The Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute will provide researchers possibility to carry out their research in AGMI, including necessary research materials and consultation.
              The deadline for application is on 15 December, 2014. The winner will be selected by the Scientific Council of the AGMI on 25 December, 2014.
              The beginning of the scholarship program is on 1 January, 2015. Winners are free to select a month within 2015 except January, February and December.
              The duration of the scholarship is one month.
              Winner of the Scholarship will provide article for International Journal of Armenian Genocide Studies as a result of his/her research within 6 months from the end of visit to Armenia.
              Financial support
              The AGMI will cover all travel and accommodation expenses related to the nominee. A separate funding will be provided to cover some per diem and research expanses.
              For complete details and application please click here.
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            • A Cinematic Look at Political Violence in Latin America

              Fridays, October and November 2014
              2:00-4:00p.m.
              Room 710 Social Sciences
              Presented by Paula Cuellar, 2014-2015 Badzin Fellow in Holocaust & Genocide Studies

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              From the dictatorships of the Southern Cone to the civil wars that took place in Central America, the selected films will provide a lens into the systematic and widespread human rights violations that were perpetrated by state authorities during the last decades of the past century. By depicting the different situations lived in Argentina, Chile, Peru, Guatemala, El Salvador, the viewers will be able to explore the darkest moments of the history of Latin America in the twentieth century through the arts. In addition to the films we will have discussions on the different implications that the particular forms of violence had for every country.



              Friday, October 10: The Official Story (Argentina, 1985): The film deals with the story of an upper middle class couple who lives in Buenos Aires with an illegally adopted child. The mother comes to realize that her daughter may be the child of a desaparecido, a victim of the forced disappearances that occurred during Argentina's last military dictatorship. Director: Luis Puenzo.
              Friday, October 17: Death and the Maiden (Chile, 1994): Paulina is a housewife married to a prominent lawyer in an unnamed South American country. One day a storm forces her husband Gerardo to ride home with a charming stranger. She is convinced that the stranger, Doctor Miranda, was part of the old fascist regime and that he tortured and raped her for weeks while she was blindfolded. Paulina takes him captive to determine the truth. Director: Roman Polanski.
              Friday, October 24: The Fall of Fujimori (Peru, 2005): The Fall of Fujimori is a character-driven, political-thriller documentary that explores the volatile events that defined Alberto Fujimori's decade-long reign of Peru. In 2000 he fled the country for Japan to avoid facing 21 charges of corruption, murder and human rights abuses. Then, five years later, Fujimori flew into Chile and declared his intention of once again running for president in 2006. This is his story. Director: Ellen Perry.
              Friday, October 31: When The Mountains Tremble (Guatemala, 1983): Documentary film produced by Skylight Pictures about the war between the Guatemalan Military and the Mayan Indigenous population of Guatemala. It narrates the story of the Guatemalan people at large, specifically the struggles of the poor and peaceful Indian population that came to be labeled "subversives" by a draconian government. Director: Pamela Yates.
              Friday, November 7: Monseñor: The Last Journey of Óscar Romero (El Salvador, 2011) In the 1970s, as El Salvador moved irrevocably closer to civil war, one man was known as the voice of the poor, the disenfranchised, the disappeared. Appointed Archbishop in 1977, Monseñor Oscar Romero worked tirelessly for peace, justice and human rights, while in constant personal peril. Using the power of the pulpit to denounce official corruption, he inspired millions with his nationally broadcast sermons, until in March of 1980; he was shot dead at the altar. Directors: Ana Carrigan and Juliet Weber.
              Friday, November 14: Pictures from a Revolution (Nicaragua, 1991): In this lively, intellectually stimulating discourse on the power of images, a renowned photojournalist returns to the scenes of a revolution she witnessed and captured with her camera. Delving into the lives of guerrillas, Sandinistas, and bystanders, scattered from Miami to Managua, a decade after they faced off in a bloody struggle, this artful film finds both disappointment and modest pride amidst still fresh, stirring memories. Director: Susan Meiselas.
              For more information please contact Paula Cuellar at cuell020@umn.edu.
              Paula Cuellar is the 2014-2015 Badzin Fellow in Holocaust and Genocide Studies and is currently working towards a minor in Human Rights and an advanced degree in History at the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on genocide of indigenous people in El Salvador and Paraguay in the 20th century. Cuellar's academic education includes a LL.B. Degree from the Central American University "José Simeón Cañas," a Master´s Degree in Human Rights and Education for Peace from the University of El Salvador and a LL.M. Degree in International Human Rights Law from Notre Dame. She also has a Postgraduate Diploma on Human Rights and Democratization´s Processes from the University of Chile and several diplomas on constitutional law and transitional justice courses.
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            • Barbara Frey, will present on Human Rights Advocacy in Mexico at the first HGMV workshop

              "Uneven Ground: Asymmetries of Power in Human Rights Advocacy in Mexico"
              Presented by Barbara Frey, Director, Human Rights Program
              Thursday, October 2
              3:00p.m.
              Room 710 Social Sciences
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              The presentation is the first of the 2014-2015 workshops for the Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence Studies (HGMV) Interdisciplinary Graduate Group.



              Professor Frey will explore the social and political context or "terrain" in which human
              rights actors work in Mexico and the barriers to their success in protecting human rights on the ground. She will show how this terrain affects advocacy by describing one particular case, the campaign for due process reforms in the criminal justice system. Frey's central finding is that the terrain of human rights advocacy in Mexico is profoundly "uneven" - characterized by asymmetries of power that limit the effectiveness of the human rights movement to bring about sustainable human rights protections.
              Barbara Frey is Director of the Human Rights Program in the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota. Frey has headed the Program since it was established in 2001, for the purpose of providing academic, research and outreach opportunities for students in the field of international human rights.
              The HGMV workshop was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory.
              For more information about HGMV please email Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.
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            • Our Mothers, Our Heimat, Our Holocaust: "Ordinary" Nazis on German Television, 1984-2014

              A Lecture by Offer Ashkenazi
              Monday, September 22
              4:00 p.m.
              1210 Heller Hall

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              Edgar Reitz's groundbreaking TV drama "Heimat" aired 30 years ago in an attempt to 'take back" German history from the American entertainment industry. Going back to this drama -- and to the sequel and prequel Reitz directed during the past decades -- I will suggest that "Heimat" subtly provided a revolutionary portrayal of World War II as a framework in which "German" and "Jewish" categories have been melded together to create a new nation (or a genuine alternative to "American" imperialism). In emphasizing this process, I will look at more recent productions, such as "Generation War," to argue that Reitz's implicit notion of German-Jewish symbiosis has been replicated in later mainstream TV dramas. The transformation of this image, however, replaced the self-criticism (or self-mockery) of "Heimat" with a melodramatic affirmation of Germany's "cure" from its violent past.

              Ofer Ashkenazi, Department of History Koebner-Minerva Center for German History
              The Hebrew University, Jerusalem. Ashkenazi received his PhD in History from the Hebrew University in 2006 and conducted his post-doctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley, was a visiting professor at the University of Minnesota returning to Jerusalem, in the summer of 2013. During 2013-2014 he taught classes on the 'visual turn' in the study of history; cultural aspects of the Great War; film and history; and Nazism. His research interests include Central European cultural and intellectual history, modern visual culture, and Jewish urban experience in twentieth-century Europe. He is currently working on a research project that examines the works of filmmakers and photographers who emigrated from Germany during the 1930s. It explores the influence of the experiences, the intellectual paradigms, and the artistic imagination of the Weimar era on the development of various national cultures in post-1933 Europe, the United States and Israel.
              Presented by the Department of German,Scandinavian& Dutch. Sponsored by: The Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, The Center for German & European Studies, The Department of History and the Center for Jewish Studies
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            • Convert or Die Christian Persecution and the Rise of the Islamic State

              A round table discussion with French author Richard Millet

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              Thursday, September 18
              3:00pm
              Room 710 Social Sciences Building

              In recent months Christians in Iraq have been given a seriously stark choice by the terrorist group ISIS- "Convert, pay a religious tax, or die!" Forcing many to flee while others have been tortured and killed. Mainly unnoticed by the media the current crisis has hit peak levels and Iraqi Christians no longer feel safe in their homes or country.

              French author Richard Millet will discuss the current situation giving insight into the crisis. Millet has spent many years in Lebanon living among the Christian Maronites his latest work on Middle Eastern Christians will be published in Paris later this year.

              The lecture will be in French & English with a translation by Bruno Chaouat, Chair of the Department of French & Italian, and Monica Kelley, JD, PhD.

              This is the first and long-awaited visit of Richard Millet to the United States. Millet is the author of over twenty books of fiction, a prolific essayist, and a beacon of the contemporary French novel. His essays have provoked robust debate in Europe. His eclectic writings include autobiographical novels that explore questions of origin, mourning and dereliction. His most recent work is on Charlotte Salomon, a German Jewish artist murdered at Auschwitz.

              Sponsored by: Human Rights Program, Department of French & Italian and Program in Human Rights & Health

              Photo: Eddie Potros

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            • Call for Abstracts Special Issue of Gender & History

              Special Issue of Gender & History Volume 28:3 (November 2016)
              Gender and Global Warfare in the Twentieth Century
              Edited by Louise Edwards (UNSW Australia), Martha Hanna (University of Colorado), and Patricia M. E. Lorcin (University of Minnesota).

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              Gender & History calls for article abstracts for a special issue addressing 'Gender and Global Warfare in the Twentieth Century'. Although the occasion for this special issue is the centenary of the First World War, we are interested in contributions that provide a gendered analysis of modern warfare across the globe and throughout the twentieth century, as well as articles relating to the First World War era in particular. Scholarly contributions to the literature on gender and war are usually restricted to a specific war in a specific place, but the memory and trauma of past wars shape the politics, cultures and societies in post-war periods and create the basis on which future wars are waged, experienced or perceived.

              We welcome papers that consider these connections by exploring the gendered implications of global warfare, and also papers that connect the First World War era with subsequent wars. We encourage potential contributors to consider larger questions of how gender analysis challenges or changes some of the categories that routinely inform war studies. We invite work that falls under one or more of the following rubrics: gendering engagement and resistance, sexuality and violence, politics and culture, memory and trauma, health practices and medicine, and ideologies of war. Interested authors are encouraged to consult the extended version of this call for abstracts on the Gender & History website by clicking here.
              The production of the special issue will follow a symposium, to be held at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in late April or early May 2015 (date to be announced), whose participants will be selected on the basis of the abstracts submitted. Please submit 1-2 page abstracts in English (500-750 words maximum) to gendhist@umn.edu by October 1, 2014, with 'Special Issue 28:3 abstract submission' in the subject line (limited funds for the translation of articles written in other languages might be available). Invitations to present at the symposium will be issued in November 2014. Papers must be submitted for pre-circulation to the editors by March 30, 2015, as a condition of participation.
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            • Fellowship in Advanced Shoah Studies

              The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference)
              is offering a limited number of fellowships for Ph.D. and Post Doctoral Candidates
              Conducting Research on the Holocaust.

              The application deadline is January 5, 2015 for the academic year of 2015-2016.
              Maximum Award Amount: $20,000 Per Year

              The Saul Kagan Claims Conference Fellowship for Advanced Shoah Studies aims to strengthen Shoah studies and Holocaust memory throughout the world. Our mission is to support the advanced study of the fate of Jews who were systematically targeted for destruction or persecution by the Nazis and their allies between 1933 and 1945, as well as immediate post-war events.



              Studies covered by the Fellowships can include the immediate historical context in which the Holocaust took place and encompass political, economic, legal, religious and socio-cultural aspects, as well as ethical and moral implications. The Fellowship also supports awardees in learning languages necessary to studying original Holocaust- related documents, such as languages of the former Soviet Union and certain European countries. Candidates can be pursuing a degree in a variety of fields, including History, Sociology, Philosophy, Judaic Studies, Political Science, Government, Women's Studies and other fields. Candidates focusing on the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust will also be considered.
              For more information please click here.
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            • First Meeting of the HGMV 2014-2015 Workshop Announced

              Holocaust, Genocide and Mass Violence
              Studies (HGMV) Interdisciplinary Graduate Group
              2014-2015 workshops

              First Meeting
              Thursday, September 18
              12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
              Room 710 Social Sciences Building
              Lunch will be provided

              The group was founded to foster interdisciplinary conversations on the subject areas of Holocaust studies, genocide and memory, peace and conflict studies, human rights, nationalism and ethnic violence, representations of violence and trauma, conflict resolution, transitional justice, historical consciousness and collective memory.

              The HGMV Graduate Group also provides funds for graduate students whose work has been accepted for conference presentations.

              To RSVP to the September 18 meeting or for more information on how to become involved please contact Erma Nezirevic at nezir001@umn.edu.


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            • Call for Applications: Introduction to the Holocaust in the Soviet Union

              The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum invites applications for the seminar "A Research Introduction to the Holocaust in the Soviet Union." This seminar will be held January 5-9, 2015, at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC.

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              The objective of the seminar is to acquaint advanced undergraduate, MA, and early PhD students with the central topics, issues, and sources related to the study of the Holocaust in the Soviet Union, including mass shootings, evacuation and rescue, forced labor, and issues of commemoration and memory. Mandel Center scholars will lead discussions, and the seminar will include group analysis of many of the types of primary source material available in the Museum's collections. In addition, participants will have the opportunity to explore the Museum's extensive library, archival, and other collections.

              All application materials must be received by Tuesday, September 30, 2014. Selected participants will be notified by November 1, 2014.

              Please click here for full details and application requirements.

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            • Seats still available for new course, Never Again! Memory and Politics after Genocide

              SOC 4090 and GLOS 4910
              Tue/Th 1.00 to 2.30 (FALL 2014) /Room 15 Humphrey Center
              Instructor: Alejandro Baer, Associate Professor Sociology, Feinstein Chair and Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

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              Course overview: This course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. How do individuals, communities and societies come to terms with these atrocities? How do successor regimes balance the demands for justice with the need for peace and reconciliation? How is public memory of the atrocities constructed?

              Section I provides an overview of the basic concepts and themes of this class: defining mass violence, collective memory and forgetting in post-atrocity contexts, and transitional justice. In Section II we will look at memory of the Holocaust among descendants of victims and descendants of perpetrators and its impact on the way other communities shape and represent their memories of mass violence and victimhood, i.e. their specific demands, symbolic politics and judicial strategies. In Section III we will address cases from around the globe and different historical settings, including the legacies of State terror in Latin America, the aftermath of Stalinist mass violence in Eastern Europe and American Indian struggles for memory and justice.

              We will also examine public remembrance projects such as monuments and museums, film and television series, visual art and other initiatives which operate in conjunction or in tension with legal and political procedures (tribunals, truth commissions, reparations, etc.) and are often initiated by human rights NGOs, victim organizations, intellectuals and artists.

              Course Format: This course will be conducted as a combined lecture and discussion course. This basic format will be supplemented by occasional in-class exercises.

              Course Requirements: In addition to regular attendance and active participation in discussions, students are required to complete short in-class writing based on the readings, write two 4-5 page, double spaced, critical essays, complete one mid-term exam and a end of semester essay.


              Section I provides an overview of the basic concepts and themes of this class: defining mass violence, collective memory and forgetting in post-atrocity contexts, and transitional justice. In Section II we will look at memory of the Holocaust among descendants of victims and descendants of perpetrators and its impact on the way other communities shape and represent their memories of mass violence and victimhood, i.e. their specific demands, symbolic politics and judicial strategies. In Section III we will address cases from around the globe and different historical settings, including the legacies of State terror in Latin America, the aftermath of Stalinist mass violence in Eastern Europe and American Indian struggles for memory and justice.
              We will also examine public remembrance projects such as monuments and museums, film and television series, visual art and other initiatives which operate in conjunction or in tension with legal and political procedures (tribunals, truth commissions, reparations, etc.) and are often initiated by human rights NGOs, victim organizations, intellectuals and artists.
              Course Format: This course will be conducted as a combined lecture and discussion course. This basic format will be supplemented by occasional in-class exercises.
              Course Requirements: In addition to regular attendance and active participation in discussions, students are required to complete short in-class writing based on the readings, write two 4-5 page, double spaced, critical essays, complete one mid-term exam and a end of semester essay.
              Visit One Stop to register.
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            • Registration open for Holocaust and Genocide related courses

              Registration for University of Minnesota's fall 2014 semester is now open with a number of courses that fall within the Center's interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Holocaust and genocide.

              The following courses are designed to provide direct and comprehensive instruction on the topic of the Holocaust, as well as the social, memorial and political impact of genocides:

              History 3729, Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe
              Professor Gary Cohen
              Comprehensive exploration of Third Reich. Students will examine How the Nazis came to power, transformations of 1930s, imposition of racial politics against Jews/others, nature of total war. Students read historical accounts, memoirs, state documents, view films.

              Global Studies 4910, "Never Again!" Memory and Politics After Genocide
              Professor Alejandro Baer
              This course focuses on the aftermath of large-scale political violence. How do individuals, communities and societies come to terms with these atrocities? How do successor regimes balance the demands for justice with the need for peace and reconciliation? How is public memory of the atrocities constructed?

              For an extended list of multi-disciplinary courses that present contextual studies of conflicts, human rights violations, power dynamics, social memory and transformation that are mirrored in the Holocaust and other genocides, please see the Fall 2014 Courses List.pdf

              To register please visit the University of Minnesota's One Stop Home.


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            • Paula Sofia Cuellar announced as the 2014-2015 Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellow

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              The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Department of History are pleased to announce the Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies has been awarded to Paula Sofia Cuellar.

              Cuellar's research project will focus on genocide of indigenous people in El Salvador and Paraguay in the twentieth century. She suggests that during the military dictatorships of General Maximiliano Hernández in El Salvador (1931 to 1944) and of General Alfredo Stroessner in Paraguay (1954 to 1989), the genocide of indigenous people characterized national security policies in both countries.

              Cuellar's academic education includes a LL.B. Degree from the Central American University "José Simeón Cañas" and includes a Master´s Degree in Human Rights and Education for Peace from the University of El Salvador and a LL.M. Degree in International Human Rights Law from Notre Dame. She also has a Postgraduate Diploma on Human Rights and Democratization´s Processes from the University of Chile and several diplomas on constitutional law and transitional justice courses. She is currently working towards a minor in Human Rights and an advanced degree in History at the University of Minnesota.

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              Wahutu Siguru the recipient of the Badzin Graduate Fellowship in 2013-2014 will receive a $9,000 fellowship extension for Spring semester of 2015 to continue his research. Siguru seeks to answer the questions about what frames and memories journalists (especially African journalists) rely upon when reporting about mass violence, specifically on Darfur. Siguru hopes to show how the way conflict situations are represented have consequences on how suffering and victimization are understood and what types of responses they will inspire in terms of possible interventions (humanitarian, legal or military).

              The Badzin Fellowship pays a living stipend of $18,000, and the cost of tuition, mandatory fees and health insurance. An applicant must be a current student in a Ph.D. program in the College of Liberal Arts, currently enrolled in the first, second, third, or fourth year of study, and have a doctoral dissertation project in Holocaust and genocide studies.
              The fellowship is awarded on the basis of the quality and scholarly potential of the dissertation project, the applicant's quality of performance in the graduate program, and the applicant's general scholarly promise.
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            • Daniel Schroeter awarded Ina Levine Invitational Scholar Fellowship

              One of the less known dimensions of the history of World War II was how Jews living under French colonial rule in North Africa were devastated by the fall of France and the establishment of the French collaborationist government of Vichy in 1940. The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) in Washington, DC has in recent years amassed a considerable archive related to the Jews of North Africa during the war and has encouraged scholars to research this subject.

              In June 2010, Daniel Schroeter, the Amos S. Deinard Memorial Chair in Jewish History at the University of Minnesota, co-taught a research workshop at the USHMM, and began studying their voluminous collection of documents. He will be returning to Washington, DC, having been awarded the Ina Levine Invitational Scholar Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies of the USHMM for the 2014-2015 academic year.

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              During Schroeter's residency at the USHMM, he will be conducting research for a book on the subject of Vichy and the Jews in the protectorate of Morocco. Jews under French colonial rule were legally classified as indigenous Moroccan subjects of the sultan, a ruler whose power was limited and controlled by the French administration. The anti-Jewish laws, instigated by the central Vichy government in France, and promulgated in Morocco by the French protectorate authorities as royal decrees signed by the sultan Mohammed Ben Youssef, revealed the racism and discrimination inherent in the colonial system and the ambivalent position of the Moroccan monarchy and the Muslim population towards the Jews.

              Research conducted at the Center will focus on the legal, social, and economic impact of the Vichy regime on the Moroccan Jewish communities, the response of the Muslim leaders and population to the anti-Jewish measures implemented in different parts of the country, and the contested politics of remembrance of World War II in Morocco.

              For more information on Daniel Schroeter, please click here.

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            • Exhumations, Memory and the Return of Civil War Ghosts in Spain

              On May 8th, the Reframing Mass Violence Collaborative hosted Associate Researcher of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Francisco Ferrándiz, to present a lecture entitled Exhumations, Memory and the Return of Civil War Ghosts in Spain.

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              In his talk, Ferrándiz examined the social process of the exhumation of mass graves from the Spanish Civil War and the Post-War years, including from political and legal initiatives of great social and media impact to local actions on the ground, at times failed, ephemeral or almost imperceptible, but no less crucial.

              To view the lecture please click here.

              This event was co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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            • Genocide and its Aftermath: Lessons from Rwanda


              On April 16, 17 & 19, the Institute for Global Studies, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Human Rights Program held a series of events to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 1994 genocide that took the lives of an estimated 500,000-1,000,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus. The events included a public conference, a student conference, and a K-16 teacher workshop. The objectives of the commemorative events were: promoting public understanding of what happened in Rwanda, discussing the immediate responses of the international community to the violence, and analyzing the long-term consequences that the cataclysmic failure to prevent the genocide had on international policy and action.

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              The public conference, Genocide and its Aftermath: Lessons from Rwanda, was designed to bring together research and praxis. Academics, activists and diplomats led a public exploration of what we have learned from the genocide in Rwanda and how we have been affected by, and should use, that knowledge to create more effective methods of intervention. Themes of the panels included: representations of atrocity, immediate aftermaths, transitional justice and its impacts, and preventing genocide and mass atrocity.

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              Watch the conference's opening address by Taylor Krauss, founder of Voices of Rwanda, and the keynote address by Adama Dieng, United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, as well as the three panel discussions, by clicking here or visiting CHGS' youtube channel.


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            • Hollie Nyseth Brehm will represent CHGS at summer Genocide Scholars Conference


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              Dr. Hollie Nyseth Brehm will represent the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies this summer at the International Association of Genocide Scholars (IAGS) Conference, "Time, Movement, and Space: Genocide Studies and Indigenous Peoples." Held at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada from July 16-19, 2014, this eleventh annual conference presents an opportunity for genocide scholars to engage in discussion about colonial control over, expansion into, appropriation and settlement of Indigenous territories.

              At the Saturday session of the conference, Dr. Nyseth Brehm will join Christoper Uggen and Jean-Damascene Gasanabo to present a panel on "Genocide, Justice and Rwanda's Gacaca Courts" under the conference's heading of "Genocide's Spaces of Law and Justice."

              On June 9, 2014 Dr. Nyseth Brehm successfully defended her dissertation, "Conditions and Courses of Genocides." Her advisors are professors Elizabeth Boyle and Joachim Savelsberg. In fall 2014, Dr. Nyseth Brehm will begin her career as an Assistant Professor of Sociology with the Department of Sociology at Ohio State University-Columbus.


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            • CHGS & HRP grant three students human rights awards


              Each spring, the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies celebrate the tremendous work of students in human rights with the Inna Meiman Award and the Sullivan Ballou Award. This year three University of Minnesota undergraduate students have been recognized for their accomplishments in promoting and protecting human rights. Melanie Paurus has been awarded the 4th Annual Inna Meiman Human Rights Award, while Joe Fifield and Anna Meteyer have been honored with the Sullivan Ballou Award.

              The Inna Meiman Award is given in recognition of the friendship between Inna Meiman, a Soviet era Jewish refusenik who was repeatedly denied a visa to seek medical treatment, and Lisa Paul, a graduate of the University of Minnesota who fought tirelessly on her behalf, including a 25-day hunger strike that galvanized a movement for Inna's freedom. The award is intended to recognize a University of Minnesota student who embodies a commitment to human rights. As this year's recipient, Melanie Paurus will receive a $1,000 scholarship.

              The Sullivan Ballou Award is supported by the Sullivan Ballou Fund and is named after Major Sullivan Ballou, an Army soldier killed at the First Battle of Bull Run in the U.S. Civil War. The award honors Major Ballou's memory by recognizing a student who devotes heartfelt energy to promote human rights. The Sullivan Ballou Fund gives $1000 awards to celebrate and affirm people acting from the heart. They provide compassion, services, or advocacy to their local communities, the poor, homeless, children, victims of violence and mistreatment or the disabled.

              Melanie, Joe and Anna embody the spirit with which these awards were created - recognizing a significant personal contribution to protecting human rights and the heartfelt energy that compels an advocate to take meaningful action.

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            • Exhumations, Memory, and the Return of Civil War Ghosts in Spain

              Francisco Ferrandiz, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

              Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe.

              Thursday, May 8
              3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
              1-109 Herbert M Hanson, Jr Hall

              Since 2000, the exhumation of mass graves from the Spanish Civil War and the Post-War years, mostly involving the largely abandoned graves of civilians killed in the Francoist rearguard by paramilitary groups, has become a central element in contemporary social and political debates in the country about the nature of the armed conflict and the dictatorial regime following it. Although exhumations have become a crucial tool for symbolic reparation and have triggered claims for justice for the crimes committed and now unearthed, the social process unleashed by their opening is way larger, and relates to the emergence of a fragmented and heterogeneous political culture focused on the memory of the defeated in the war.

              In this talk, the complexity and dynamism of this process is analyzed, including from political and legal initiatives of great social and media impact to local actions on the ground, at times failed, ephemeral or almost imperceptible, but no less crucial. Regional differences, associated to uneven public memory policies, will also be considered.

              Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence Research Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.


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            • CHGS partners with international Holocaust institutions for a major conference in Madrid



              On November 24-26, 2014, a conference entitled, Bystanders, Rescuers or Perpetrators? The Neutrals and the Shoah - Facts, Myths and Countermyths, will be held at Centro Sefarad-Israel in Madrid, Spain.

              This conference is supported by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) and sponsored by Centro Sefarad Israel - Madrid; Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies- University of Minnesota; Mémorial de la Shoah - Paris; History Unit of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland - Berne; Topography of Terror Foundation - Berlin; Living History Forum - Stockholm; Memoshoá/Association for the Education and Remembrance of the Holocaust - Lisbon and Tarih Vakfı/History Foundation - Istanbul.

              The conveners are calling for scholarly papers on the policies of the neutral countries during the Holocaust and the public debate on them in these countries.

              The conference will thus aim at addressing the following issues:

              •The neutral countries' reactions to Nazi anti-Jewish policies and their own policies on Jewish refugees;
              •Their response to the German ultimatum of 1943 to either repatriate Jews with citizenship from their respective countries who lived in Nazi-occupied Europe or to allow their deportation;
              •The genesis and long-lasting effects of "rescue myths", the current state of the discussion regarding the neutral countries' positions during the Holocaust;
              •The dealing with the history of the Jewish persecution in state fact-finding commissions and committees of historians;
              •Approaches to Holocaust education in neutral countries.
              •Holocaust public memory (ceremonies, memorials, museums) and memory politics in neutral countries.

              Please send your proposals (up to 350 words) and brief CVs no later than May 25, 2014 to: conference2014@sefarad-israel.es

              For more information, please view Call for Papers Bystanders.doc

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            • The Role of Visual Testimony in Survivors of the Mayan Genocide in Guatemala and Mexico

              Marisol Soto, PhD student at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

              Holocaust Genocide & Mass Violence Studies Workshop (HGMV)

              Thursday, May 1
              Room 609 Social Sciences
              3:00PM

              Marisol Soto's project examines the intersection among photography, social integration beyond trauma and the action of human rights organizations, and explores the important role that photography plays in documenting and reporting human trafficking that targets indigenous populations. I contend that genocides do not only result in direct violence against their victims, but also leave vulnerable communities of survivors that are targets of further violence. In addition, this proposal examines paradoxes resulting from the use of testimonies and archives outside the human rights community, such as in the consumption of atrocity in the media, an act which leads to the re-victimization of young women and children who are victims of trafficking. Finally, I will use photography and literary and testimonial narratives in new ways that complement more traditional forms of expression and provide new insights into the trauma of the victims, with the ultimate goal of contributing to their recovery and protection, and to raise awareness in the society.


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            • Under Construction: Battles of Memory, Human Rights and Cultural Practices

              Ana Forcinito, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese, U of M.
              Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe.
              Thursday, April 24
              3:00 p.m.
              1-109 Hanson Hall

              Cultural practices have played a crucial role in the construction of collective memory in Argentina, by addressing the invisibility and the silence about human rights violations, by exploring different layers of memory, and by reframing the interpretations that surround human rights struggles. This talk will offer an overview of the battles of memory after the last military dictatorship in Argentina (1976-1983), focusing on artistic and cultural practices in dialogue with crucial moments of the post dictatorship period.

              Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence Research Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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            • The Evolving Memory of Argentina's "Disappeared"

              Thursday, April 10
              4:00p.m.
              Northrop, Best Buy Theater

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              Speaker: Emilio Crenzel, Sociology, University of Buenos Aires
              Response: Leigh Payne, Global Studies, University of Oxford and University of Minnesota

              The panel sheds light on the most substantial transformations and the continuities in Argentina's social memory of its recent past and discusses the processes that led Argentina's Truth Commission Report Nunca Más (1984) to become the canonical way the disappearances and the country's political violence is publicly remembered, and how its meaning has been modified by new interpretations in the last two decades.

              Other University of Minnesota faculty participants on the panel are Ana Forcinito (Spanish and Portuguese Studies) and Alejandro Baer (Director, CHGS).

              Both panels are cosponsored by the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

              The Reframing Mass Violence Collaborative explores the particular developments and transnational entanglements of social memories in societies, revisiting their legacies of dictatorship, state terror, and grave human rights violations in Latin America and Southern Europe.

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            • Twin Cities Film Premier Aftermath & The Last of the Unjust

              Aftermath
              Thursday, April 10
              7:00p.m.
              St, Anthony Main Theatre
              Part of The Film Society of Mpls/St. Paul International Film Festival
              Introduction by Alejandro Baer, Director CHGS

              For tickets and information please click here.

              Inspired by real events that haunt Poland's past, Wladyslaw Pasikowski (who wrote the screenplay for Andrzej Wajda's Katyn) turns in a hard-hitting allegory on the anti-Semitism that still raises its ugly head in his home country. Franek and Jozek are brothers who are reunited after 20 years in order to take care of the family farm. Franek, recently returned from the US, discovers that Jozek has been ostracized from the community for threatening to uncover a dark secret. As Franek and Jozek struggle to rebuild their relationship, they are drawn into a horrifying gothic tale. Upon its release in Poland, Aftermath received acclaim, but also generated intense controversy.

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              The Last of the Unjust
              Sunday, April 13
              1 p.m.
              St Anthony Main Theatre
              Part of The Film Society of Mpls/St. Paul International Film Festival
              Introduction by Bruno Chaoaut, Chair, Department of French & Italian, former director CHGS.

              For tickets and information please click here.

              Claude Lanzmann returns to a series of interviews he made in 1975 with Benjamin Murmelstein, the last President of the Jewish Council in the Theresienstadt ghetto. Murmelstein was largely demonized after the war, accused of collaborating with the Nazis, with his survival being the proof. These interviews, however, tell a different story--one of a pragmatic man who fought not only for his own survival but also the survival of every Jew he could possibly help. A powerful addendum to Lanzmann's masterpiece Shoah, The Last of the Unjust employs an unadorned style for an incredibly complicated historical narrative that continues to be defined today.

              Sponsored by the European Studies Consortium, Institute for Global Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, The Center for Jewish Studies, the Department of French & Italian, and The Film Society of Mpls/St. Paul.

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            • Rescheduled: War, Genocide & Justice: Cambodian American Memory Work

              A lecture by Cathy Schlund-Vials
              Thursday, April 3
              3:00p.m.
              Walter Library Conference Room 101

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              Dr. Schlund-Vials is an Associate Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Connecticut at Storrs. She is the Director of the UConn Asian American Studies Institute and the Faculty Director for Humanities House. She was awarded the 2011 AAUP "Teaching Promise" award (at the University of Connecticut). In 2013, she was the recipient of the Association for Asian American Studies's "Early Career Award."

              Her research interests include refugee cultural production, critical race theory, immigration law, human rights, and contemporary ethnic American literary studies.

              She has recently completed her second book, War, Genocide, and Justice: Cambodian American Memory Work (University of Minnesota Press, Fall 2012), which is focused on genocide remembrance and juridical activism in Cambodian American literature, film, and hip hop.

              Dr. Schlund-Vials is currently working on a third project, tentatively titled "Imperial Coordinates: War, Containment, and Asian American Critique," which engages a spatial reading of U.S. imperialism through Asian American writing about militarized zones, internment camps, and relocation centers.

              Sponsored by: Asian American Studies, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, University of Minnesota Press.

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            • Badzin Fellowship Call for Applications Extended

              Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies, 2014-15

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              The University of Minnesota Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Department of History invite applications from current doctoral students in the UMN College of Liberal Arts for the Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies for the academic year 2014-15. The Badzin Fellowship will pay a stipend of $18,000, the cost of tuition and health insurance, and $1,000 toward the mandatory graduate student fees.

              Eligibility: An applicant must be a current student in a Ph.D. program in the College of Liberal Arts, currently enrolled in the first, second, third, or fourth year of study, and have a doctoral dissertation project in Holocaust and/or genocide studies. The fellowship will be awarded on the basis of the quality and scholarly potential of the dissertation project, the applicant's quality of performance in the graduate program, and the applicant's general scholarly promise.

              Required application materials:

              1) A letter of application (maximum 4 pages single-spaced) describing the applicant's intellectual interests and dissertation research and the research and/or writing which the applicant expects to do during the fellowship year
              2) A current curriculum vitae for the applicant
              3) An unofficial transcript of all graduate work done at the University of Minnesota
              4) TWO confidential letters of recommendation from U of MN faculty, discussing the quality of the applicant's graduate work and dissertation project and the applicant's progress toward completing the degree, sent directly to the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

              Deadline: All application materials must be received by the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies electronically at chgs@umn.edu, no later than 3:00 pm on Friday, April 11, 2014. The awardee will be announced Friday, April 25, 2014.


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            • CHGS and University Departments and Centers comment on the Gasthof dinner

              Minneapolis group 'plays' Nazi: Sorry, it's no trifle
              by ALEJANDRO BAER, SABINE ENGEL, RICK MC CORMICK, RIV-ELLEN PRELL, RUTH MAZO KARRAS, and KLAAS VAN DER SANDEN
              Star Tribune
              March 19, 2014

              It's an insult to those who suffered in the Holocaust and to those who campaigned then (and since) against such evil.

              Late last week, City Pages published photographs that showed men dressed in German SS uniforms seated in the main dining room of the northeast Minneapolis restaurant Gasthof zur Gemutlichkeit, surrounded by Nazi flags. According to a participant, this was a World War II historical re-enactment meeting, "just like any club that has a party."

              In Germany and several other European states, laws prohibit the public use of symbols of Nazism -- in particular, flags, insignia and uniforms. The reason: It assaults the human dignity of others by insulting, maliciously smearing or defaming segments of the population.

              While in the United States the First Amendment gives constitutional protection to this type of conduct -- no matter how offensive its content -- the public display of racist or extremist symbolism usually has been followed by indignation, outrage and demands for action.

              To read the entire article please click here.

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            • IAS Collaborative Reframing Mass Violence presents Glenda Mezarobba

              Brazilian Truth Commission: Is It Time to 'Reframe' the Gross Human Rights Violations?
              Glenda Mezarobba
              Thursday, March 27
              3:00-4:30pm
              1-109 Hanson Hall

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              Glenda Mezarobba, United Nations Development Project Representative for the Brazilian Truth Commission

              Glenda Mezarobba provides an overview of the Brazilian Truth Commission and reflects on the meaning and the implications of the work of countries, like Brazil, to revisit their legacies of dictatorship (1964-1988). She presents possibilities of these contemporary processes to re-interpret and re-frame the atrocities themselves and to improve the quality of Brazil's democratic institutions.

              Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence Research Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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            • Carla Manzoni, PhD Candidate, Spanish and Portuguese to present at the next HGMV workshop

              Argentina's Collages of Memory: Aesthetic heritage in post-dictatorial film Los Rubios (2003)
              Holocaust, Genocide, Mass Violence Workshop
              Thursday, March 13
              3:00 p.m.
              Room 609 Social Sciences

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              Los Rubios (The Blonds)
              In 1977, when she was four years old, Albertina Carri's parents vanished without a trace, victims of Argentina's brutal military junta. In The Blonds, (or Los Rubios, her parents' nickname) the young Argentinian filmmaker travels with her crew across Buenos Aires to unravel the mystery of her parents' life, disappearance and death. Attacking the shifting projections of memory from many fronts, Carri enlists an actor, her parents' comrades, fading photographs and happy Playmobil* dolls to investigate complicated questions of identity and responsibility.

              Carla Manzoni was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She is currently a PhD candidate (A.B.D since April, 27. 2012) at the Spanish and Portuguese Department, University of Minnesota. She holds a MA in Hispanic and Lusophonic Literatures and Cultures at the same university and previous studies in her native Argentina in Public Relations (undergraduate) and Communication Management (post-graduate).

              Carla has worked in political communication, diverse media -such as TV, radio and film- and cultural non-for-profits. She is currently working on her dissertation as wells as on her conservation project which attempts to create an archive of unedited Latin American independent videoart and experimental audiovisual.

              For information on the workshop and future presentations please click here.

              To particpate please contact Wahutu Siguru at siguru@umn.edu.

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            • IAS Collaborative: Upcoming Public Lecture

              Uruguayan Memories of Dictatorship: A lector by Mariana Achugar
              (Carnegie Mellon University)
              Thursday, March 6
              Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe
              Thursdays 3:00p.m. to 4:30p.m.
              1-109 Herbert M Hanson, Jr Hall

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              Why do family conversations matter in processes of intergenerational transmission of traumatic pasts? Mariana Achugar will share some examples from a two-year ethnographic project in Uruguay where 20 youth and their families were interviewed. The analysis of the styles of interactions that occur in these families with different backgrounds will show how they make sense of the past and what narratives characterize their recollections. She will then attempt to explain why some conversations produce "more sharable" memories of the dictatorship.



              The IAS collaborative explores the particular developments and transnational entanglements of social memories in societies revisiting their legacies of dictatorship, state terror, and grave human rights violations in Latin America and Southern Europe.
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            • Genocide and its Aftermaths: Lessons from Rwanda

              A Series of Events to Commemorate the 20th Anniversary of the Genocide in Rwanda
              April 16, 17, 19, 2014

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              The Institute for Global Studies in partnership with The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Human Rights Program are hosting a series of events to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the genocide that took place in Rwanda in 1994. The events will include a public conference, a student conference, and a K-16 teacher workshop. The objectives of the commemorative events are: promoting public understanding of what happened in Rwanda, discussing the immediate responses of the international community to the violence, and analyzing the long-term consequences that the cataclysmic failure to prevent the genocide had on international policy and action.

              Sponsorship made possible in part by the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Fund at the Minneapolis Foundation.

              The Public Conference
              Wednesday, April 16
              Cowles Auditorium, Humphrey School of Public Affairs
              The public conference is designed to bring together research and praxis. Academics, activists and diplomats will lead a public exploration of what we have learned from the Rwandan genocide and how we have been affected by, and should use, that knowledge to create more effective methods of intervention. Themes of the panels include: representations of atrocity, immediate aftermaths, transitional justice and its impacts, and preventing genocide and mass atrocity. This event will be free and open to the public.
              Featured Speaker: Adama Dieng, UN Special Advisor on Genocide Prevention
              Other Speakers Include:
              Eric Schwartz, Dean, Humphrey School, former National Security Adviser to President Clinton
              Curt Goering, Executive Director, Center for Victims of Torture and former Chief Operating Officer at Amnesty International USA
              Alejandro Baer, Director of the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at the University of Minnesota
              Gregory Gordon, Director of the University of North Dakota (UND) Center for Human Rights & Genocide Studies and Former Legal Officer, at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
              Barbara Frey, Director of Human Rights Program at the University of Minnesota
              Samuel Totten, Ed.D, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Arkansas
              Leigh Payne, Professor at Oxford and Senior Research Fellow for the Institute for Global Studies
              The Student Conference
              Thursday, April 17th
              Coffman Union
              The students' conference will bring together undergraduate students throughout the Midwest, from different disciplines, who are working on the genocide in Rwanda or other episodes of genocide and mass violence. Those interested in more information or submitting work should see the Call for Papers for more details and contact Wahutu j. Siguru at siguru@umn.edu by the 28th of February 2014.
              The K-16 Teacher Workshop: Featuring Professor Samuel Totten
              Saturday, April 19
              Coffman Union
              9:00a.m. to 3:00p.m.
              Samuel Totten is one of the foremost scholars of curriculum on Holocaust and genocide education and has published several texts to aid educators integrate this curriculum in their classrooms.
              CEU's are available.
              Class will be limited to 25. For more information, contact Deborah Jane at djane@umn.edu.
              Please check back for further details and updates in the coming weeks. Contact Kaela McConnon at mccon117@umn.edu with any questions or concerns.
              Event Co-sponsors: The Center for Victims of Torture, The Advocates for Human Rights, Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas, St. Cloud State Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education, World Without Genocide, Department of History, Department of French and Italian, the Institute of Diversity, Equality and Advocacy, the Program in Human Rights and Health and the Human Rights Center of the University of Minnesota
              Artwork: "Valentina's Nightmare (Face/Hand Rough)" by Peter Driessen, 1997.
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            • Call for Papers:Genocide and its Aftermaths: Lessons from Rwanda

              Undergraduate Students Conference
              April 17, 2014

              The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Human Rights Program and the Institute for Global Studies are hosting three days of events to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the genocide that took place in Rwanda in 1994. The events will include a public conference (April 16th), a student conference (April 17th) and a K-12 teacher workshop (April 19th). The objectives of the commemorative events are to promote public understanding of what happened in Rwanda, analyze the immediate responses by the international community, and discuss the long-term implications for international policy and actions to prevent and respond to genocide.

              The students' conference seeks to bring together undergraduate students (preferably advanced undergraduates) from different disciplines that are working on the Rwandan Genocide or other episodes of genocide and mass violence. To this end, we are seeking a broad range of papers that examine but are not limited to the following topics:


              The Rwandan Genocide: Historical and socio-political paths leading to the genocide; the role of the international community, including the ICTR; the gacaca courts; testimonials of survivors; public memory; etc.

              Genocide and the international community: Intervention or lack thereof in genocides and large-scale political violence; potential responses to genocide and mass violence; the role of neighboring countries, the UN and other countries.

              Genocide and the media: International and local media coverage of genocide; hate media and genocide incitement; representations of mass violence and its (cognitive and ethical) limits.

              Rape as genocide: Rape and other forms of gendered victimization during or in the aftermath of mass violence; women-headed households; medical care; children of rape.

              Justice and politics of reconciliation after genocide: The role and effectiveness of judicial processes and transitional justice mechanisms such as the ICTR, truth commissions and reparations.

              Genocide and public memory: Memorials, museums and commemoration days/weeks; the politics of commemoration; the use of human remains in memorials and related issues.

              Genocide and education. Teaching about genocide and mass atrocities; the representation of genocide in history and other textbooks.

              Abstracts not exceeding 250 words and a 2 page CV should be sent to Wahutu j. Siguru Siguru@umn.edu by the 28th of February 2014. For more information, please visit the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies Symposia & Conference page.

              The organizers will provide supporting funds to defray the costs of the participants whose paper are accepted for presentation. Out of state student presenters will be awarded up to $500 and in state student presenters will be awarded up to $200.

              The conference was made possible by funding from the Ohanessian Endowment Fund for Justice and Peace Studies at The Minneapolis Foundation and is sponsored by The Institute for Global Studies, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and the Human Rights Program at the University of Minnesota.


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            • IAS Collaborative Reframing Mass Violence presents Alejandro Baer

              The Collective Memory of Mass Atrocities
              A talk by Alejandro Baer, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies, U of M
              Thursday, February 20
              3:00p.m.
              Room 1-109 Hanson Hall

              "Postmemory", "multi-directional memory" and "cosmopolitan memory" are terms used by contemporary scholars to describe the changing nature of the practices of remembrance in post-conflict societies. We will look at the emerging modes of traumatic memory production, circulation and consumption in a globalized context, which are highly conditioned by the language of the Holocaust. The Jewish genocide serves as powerful symbol and also as a cognitive model--a script--for structuring and framing the events of a troubling past. What are its effects on social relations and individual subjects?

              Session 3 in the public, one-credit course Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe.

              Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

              This event has been designated by the Office of the Vice President for Research to satisfy the Awareness/Discussion component of the Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) continuing education requirement.

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            • Verena Stern, Research Fellow, Center for Austrian Studies to present at HGMV workshop

              Holocaust Genocide & Mass Violence Studies Workshop (HGMV)
              "Grievable Lives": Dealing with Dimensions of (Mass) Violence in Somali Transnational Migration"
              Thursday, February 13
              3:00 p.m.
              Room 710 Social Sciences

              Verena Stern is the 2013/2014 BMWF Doctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Austrian Studies at the University of Minnesota and a doctoral candidate at the Department of Political Science at the University of Vienna. She is writing her dissertation on the migration of undocumented refugees from Somalia to the European Union. Stern's research interests include Human Rights and transnational migration.

              Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS), the Human Rights Program and the Department of Sociology organizes this research workshop for graduate students and faculty members of all departments in the Humanities and Social Sciences at University of Minnesota. For a list of past and future presenters please visit the CHGS workshop page by clicking here.

              For more information or to particpate please contact Wahutu Siguru at siguru@umn.edu.

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            • Apollo Club Male Chorus Present Special Concert

              The Liberation of Auschwitz
              with special guests James Andrews, dancer, and Aaron James, baritone
              Tuesday, January 27
              7:00 P.M.
              Ted Mann Concert Hall
              Tickets available by clicking here.

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              Tuesday, January 27, 2015 marks (exactly) the 70th anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz. Arnold Schoenberg's rarely performed A Survivor from Warsaw is programmed within the WORLD-PREMIERE of noted composer James Bassi's Five Prayers. Commissioned by The Apollo Club, Five Prayers is a five-movement symphonic song cycle for male chorus, solo baritone, orchestra, and dancer. This concert is artistically conceived to begin and end liberatingly with the darkest moment in the center of the program, to symbolically represent the U-shaped Jewish menorah.
              Artisans of Music
              The Apollo Club elevates the consciousness of performance music by creating an authentic stage for amateurs and professionals alike. Since 1895, it is the signature icon of sacred and secular music in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, bringing together generations of voices who inspire audiences locally, nationally and internationally. As "artisans of music," the organization is dedicated to building craft, culture and camaraderie in the community.
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            • Special Screening of Granito: How to Nail a Dictator with filmmakers Pamela Yates and Paco Onís

              3:00 p.m.
              St Anthony Main Theatre
              Free open to the public

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              Granito tells the stories of five main characters whose destinies are joined together by Guatemala's turbulent past. Even though the Guatemalan civil war spanned from 1960-1996, Granito focuses in on the early 1980s and its ramifications for the country.

              Pamela Yates is an American documentary filmmaker and co-founder of Skylight Pictures. Four of her films have been nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.

              Paco Onis is a partner at Skylight Pictures, and previously produced documentaries for PBS, National Geographic and a range of other programs.

              Granito: Trailer

              Screening with filmmakers is part of the Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe course which take place on
              Thursday's from 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in room 235 Notle Center. All lectures are open to the public.

              Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

              Co-sponsored by the Film Society of Mpls/St. Paul.


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            • Reframing Mass Violence: Transitional Justice and Human Rights

              Barbara Frey, Director, Human Rights Program, University of Minnesota
              Thursday, January 23
              3:00 p.m.
              235 Nolte

              Countries emerging from repression, armed conflict, or mass atrocities have sought ways to address the past as a part of their transition into new forms of governance and citizenship. In this introduction to the topic, Barbara Frey will review some of the methods and mechanisms that have been developed by national and international actors, including public memorials, truth commissions, and national or international criminal prosecutions to assist societies to transition away from their repressive pasts.

              Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

              Lecture Flier: 20140114170524742.pdf

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            • Violence in Central Africa: Is the Central African Republic on the Road to Genocide?

              By Wahutu Siguru

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              Something insidious, but sadly not unexpected, is happening in the Central African Republic (CAR)-over the past twelve months mass killings have been taking place in the CAR, a former French colony in a very rough neighborhood (it borders the Sudan's to the East, Chad to the North, and DRC to the South). Things came to a head in March when the former president Francois Bozizé was deposed by a group of Muslim militants (Séléka) whom instigated sectarian killings and human rights abuses against the largely Christian populace. This has resulted in the formation of self-defense groups (Anti-balaka meaning 'sword/machete' in the Sango language) formed to protect the victims. This conflict is complicated by the fact that there are claims of the Séléka getting support from mercenaries in Sudan and Chad.

              On the 5th of December, the UN voted to allow the French to send 400 troops into the CAR who would augment the already present AU battalion of 3600. The French intend on increasing this number to 1200 troops in the coming days following a sudden outbreak of killings within the last fortnight of women and children by Séléka forces (meaning 'union' in the Sango language) that has resulted in 500 deaths and 189,000 fleeing their homes in Bangui. Fears of retaliatory attacks have become more pronounced leading both Burundi and Rwanda to pledge to send troops to the country. While the number of deaths might seem deceptively low for a nation of about 4.6 million, it only accounts for Bangui since correspondents have not been able to venture outside that area.

              In a letter by Medecins Sans Frontieres to the UN humanitarian system, MSF has accused the UN of indifference to the plight of the victims. It states that in the year that this atrocity has unfolded UN aid officials have done nothing but collect data that is related to the fighting and not provided assistance to the displaced people sheltering on the same compound as the officials.
              It is important to note that this is not "another Rwanda" as has been suggested by some. This is a power grab by a cabal of rebels that seeks to control the vast minerals that are present in CAR. It is not an attempt to rid CAR of its Christian population but rather an attempt to instill fear and submission by a belligerent group. While there may be what some UN officials have called the seeds of genocide this does not ipso facto mean that "another Rwanda" is at hand. It is however, an atrocity that is fast degenerating and a humanitarian catastrophe that is getting worse. The international community finds itself at a crossroads like it has on several occasions (Syria and Mali being the most recent). The French and the AU have taken a proactive role in trying to mitigate the situation but more is needed. The UN humanitarian system also has to step up and rise to the challenge.
              This weekend the first signs of hope appeared. Michel Djotodja, the current president and former leader of the Séléka leader said that he is willing to negotiate with Anti-balaka forces. The only problem is that he barely has control of the capital city and some of his former fighters have gone their own way. This is coupled by the fact that no one is sure how much control the faction of Anti-balaka that is willing to negotiate is representative of the movement itself. All of this is compounded by the fact that Anti-balaka has no recognizable structure further throwing into doubt who the president is actually going to negotiate with. Is it simple? No. Is it hopeless? No. It will require some rolling up of sleeves by the UN, AU, France and possibly the UNSC. This development is, however, a small but positive step that has to be fostered and natured by the international community, the sooner the better
              Wahutu Siguru is the 2013 Badzin Fellow in Holocaust and Genocide Studies and PhD candidate in the Sociology department at the University of Minnesota. Siguru's research interests are in the Sociology of Media, Genocide, Mass Violence and Atrocities (specifically on issues of representation of conflicts in Africa such as Darfur and Rwanda), Collective Memory, and perhaps somewhat tangentially Democracy and Development in Africa.
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            • The Last of the Unjust, the final words of Benjamin Murmelstein

              By Jodi Elowitz

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              Who was Benjamin Murmelstein? Why would Claude Lanzmann dedicate over 3 hours to him in his latest film The Last of the Unjust? Murmelstein was a rabbi and teacher from Vienna, third Jewish elder of the Thereseinstadt ghetto, and the only surviving Jewish elder of any of the Jewish Councils set up by the Nazis. Condemned by many in the Jewish Community as a traitor and a Nazi collaborator he was tried and acquitted by the Czech authorities after the war settling in exile in Rome where he lived until his death in 1989.

              He testified at the trial of Thereseinstadt Commandant Karl Rahm and wrote and published a book of his experiences in Terezin: Il ghetto-modello di Eichmann (Theresienstadt: Eichmann's Model Ghetto), in 1961. He submitted the book to Israeli prosecutors to use at the Eichmann trial (Adolf Eichmann, SS officer in charge of the deportation of the Jews of Europe) a submission that went unused.

              Murmelstein had much valuable information to offer, especially on Eichmann So much so that if Murmelstein's testimony had been used it would have dispelled any notion of the dispassionate Nazi bureaucrat who only followed orders as defined by Hannah Arendt's term the "banality of evil." Instead we would have seen Eichmann as a man who loved his job and pursued it with zeal and passion above and beyond what was required by his superiors. We would also have seen a corrupt man who lined his own pockets with Jewish funds for both personal and professional gain, as the extra money afforded him the financial independence to run his department apart of the bureaucratic machine and away from the eyes of his superiors.

              So why is Murmelstein's story coming to light now and why did Lanzmann wait nearly 40 years to make this film? Possibly the world was not ready for such a controversial and ambivalent figure. In 1975 Lanzmann interviewed Murmelstein for a project he was working on which later became the critically acclaimed 9-hour documentary Shoah. The interviews show that Murmelstein lived in the center of what Primo Levi referred to as the "grey zone" in his book The Drowned and the Saved. Levi's theory is that those of us who did not experience the lager (camps) and ghettos cannot place ourselves in a position to judge those that were there, nor can we view the Holocaust as something that is black or white, good or evil. We simply cannot know what we would do to survive under the circumstances.


              Murmelstein is clear that he was no saint and that he loved power, danger and adventure that went with the job of being a Jewish community leader and later elder. But he also speaks in terms of the expectations that others had in times that were not ordinary. Murmelstein towards the end of the film tells Lanzmann that in Thereisenstadt there were no saints. "There were martyrs, but martyrs are not necessarily saints."
              Murmelstein points out that many people tried to conduct life as they had under normal circumstances but there was nothing normal about Thereseinstadt, the model ghetto the Nazis had created to fool the world and the Jews imprisoned there about the "Final Solution." While Murmelstein claims his intentions were to save as many Jews as he could, others viewed him as a tyrant, a collaborator, and a man who only cared about himself. Yet many times in the interviews Murmelstein speaks of the opportunities he had to escape with his family to England and to Palestine, but he remained feeling it was his responsibility.
              As the film begins we watch the now 87-year-old Lanzmann read from Murmelstein's book in Prague, Nisko, and Theresienstadt. One might wonder if this is an egotistical ploy by Lanzmann, but as the Murmelstein interviews unfold and the 3 1/2 hours go by we realize that Lanzmann has a real affection for Murmelstein, so much so he has become a surrogate witness. Lanzmann has become Murmelstein's voice, reading passages of his beautifully worded testimony in the places that Murmesltein describes, thus collapsing time, bringing past and present together in the same space, much as he did in Shoah.
              Here amidst the past and present we hear Murmelstein in his own words, we are drawn to Murmelstein much like Lanzmann is by his bold storytelling, his intelligence, knowledge of mythology, literature and history. He seems to be telling the truth about his experiences, admitting to his flaws and the perceptions of his decisions.
              The Last of the Unjust will not be remembered as a landmark documentary about the Holocaust like Shoah. Still, it is an important work that represents a different approach to Holocaust documentary. Lanzmann acts as a surrogate witness, in this case representing an extraordinary and at the same time flawed character steeped in moral ambivalence. Lanzmann offers the viewer a much more complex and deeper understanding of humanity during the Shoah by giving a voice to a survivor whose testimony was silenced by those who were not yet ready to hear what he had to say.
              Jodi Elowitz is the Outreach Coordinator for CHGS and the Program Coordinator for the European Studies Consortium. Elowitz is currently working on Holocaust memory in Poland and artistic representation of the Holocaust in animated short films.
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            • Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe

              1 Credit Topics Course Spring 2014
              ALL sessions and guest-speaker presentations are public
              Nolte 235
              Thursdays 3:00p.m. to 4:30p.m.

              This course will explore the particular developments and transnational entanglements of social memories in societies revisiting their legacies of dictatorship, state terror, and grave human rights violations in Latin America and Southern Europe.

              It will be organized in a series of lectures in which distinguished experts from the countries of study will discuss their work and engage in dialogue with local scholars and students on the contemporary processes of re-interpretation and re-framing of the atrocities as well as the transitional justice models adopted in their aftermaths.

              Coordinators:
              • Barbara Frey (Human Rights Program)
              • Alejandro Baer (Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Dept. of Sociology)
              • Ana Forcinito (Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese)


              January 23
              Barbara Frey (U of M)
              Transitional Justice and Human Rights
              February 6
              Pamela Yates and Paco de Onís (filmmakers)
              Screening and discussion of their film "Granito: How to Nail a Dictator" (Guatemala)
              February 20
              Alejandro Baer (U of M)
              The Collective Memory of Mass Atrocities
              March 6
              Mariana Achugar (Carnegie Mellon University)
              Uruguayan Memories of Dictatorship
              March 27
              Glenda Mazzarobba (UNDP rep. for the Brazilian Truth Commission)
              Reparations, Half Truths and Impunity
              April 10
              Emilio Crenzel (University of Buenos Aires) (tbc), Ana Forcinito, Leigh Payne (Oxford/U of M) Panel Discusion: The Evolving Memory of Argentina's "Disappeared"
              April 24
              Anna Forcinito (U of M)
              Art, Memory and HHRR
              May 8
              Francisco Ferrándiz (CSIC, Madrid)
              Unearthing Civil War Victims in Spain
              Institute for Advanced Studies Research Collaborative Reframing Mass Violence 2013/2014.
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            • The Recurrence of Genocide since the Holocaust

              A Lecture by Phillip Spencer
              Friday, December 6, 2013
              12:00 p.m.
              Room 710 Social Science Building

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              After the Holocaust, the Genocide Convention was aimed explicitly of ridding mankind of this 'odious scourge.' The Convention was, with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, one of the founding documents of the post-Holocaust era; but genocide recurs, and with alarming frequency, across almost every continent. Little has been done to prevent or halt the recurrence of this 'crime of crimes' and very few perpetrators have been brought to justice.

              In this lecture, Professor Spencer explores some of the reasons that have been put forward to account for these troubling failures, and reflects on what light our current understandings of the Holocaust can throw on the acute problem of genocide today.

              Professor Philip Spencer is Director of the Helen Bamber Centre for the Study of Rights, Conflict and Mass Violence, at Kingston University. The Centre, which he founded in 2004, provides a focus for research and teaching in these areas. It is named in honor of the veteran rights campaigner Helen Bamber, who has devoted her life to the victims of conflicts across the world.

              Professor Spencer's own research interests include the Holocaust; comparative genocide; nationalism; and anti-Semitism. He is also director of the university's European Research Department, where the central focus is on European political and cultural identity, with an overall concern for the changing forms, boundaries and future of Europe in the modern world.



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            • Antisemitism Then and Now

              Commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Kristallnacht
              Panel Discussion
              December 5, 2013
              4:00 p.m.
              President's Room Coffman Memorial Union
              University of Minnesota

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              Is there a new antisemitism? A growing body of reports and research centers claim that a new strain of antisemitism is sweeping the globe. Five renowned scholars in the field of antisemitism studies will discuss historic antisemitism, its long term after effects and contemporary manifestations in Europe and the US.

              Convened by Alejandro Baer, Director, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS) and Klaas van der Sanden, Interim Director, Center of Austrian Studies (CAS)

              Panel:
              Philip Spencer (Kingston University, UK, Historian).
              Chad Allan Goldberg (University of Wisconsin Madison, Sociologist)
              Zsolt Nagy (University of St. Thomas, Political Scientist,)
              Gary Cohen (University of Minnesota, Historian)
              Bruno Chaouat (University of Minnesota, French Literature & Thought, former Director, CHGS)

              Sponsored by: The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Center for Austrian Studies, The institute for Global Studies, The European Studies Consortium, Center for Jewish Studies, Center for German and European Studies, and the Jewish Community Relations Council


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            • An Argentine Genocide? Individual Accountability and Collective Guilt during 1976-83 Dictatorship

              A talk by Antonius Robben, Anthropology,
              Utrecht University
              Monday, November 25
              4:00p.m.
              125 Nolte Center

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              The sentencing of Argentine officers for carrying out genocide by disappearing tens of thousands of citizens has opened a public debate about agency and accountability during the 1976-83 military dictatorship. This presentation analyzes how this shift from gross human rights violations to genocide is having extensive implications for national memory, political responsibility, international law, and the concept of genocide.

              Antonius Robben (PhD, Berkeley, 1986) is Professor of Anthropology at Utrecht University and past President of the Netherlands Society of Anthropology. He has been a research fellow at the Michigan Society of Fellows, Ann Arbor, the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, New York, and the David Rockefeller Center, Harvard University. His most recent books include Political Violence and Trauma in Argentina (2005) that won the Textor Prize from the American Anthropological Association in 2006, and the edited volume Iraq at a Distance: What Anthropologists Can Teach Us About the War (2010).

              Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

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