University of Minnesota
Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies
chgs@umn.edu
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  • Student Opportunities

    CHGS guides and mentors undergraduate and graduate students by organizing courses and workshops, offering grants and fellowships and providing unique opportunities for interaction with leading experts in the field. To find out more click here.

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  • Professional and Educational Resources

    CHGS supports educators through interactive workshops and institutes, facilitated by leading experts of Holocaust and genocide education. CHGS's website offers a myriad of resources for teaching age appropriate lessons about the Holocaust and genocide. To learn more click here.

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  • Courses of interest for the Fall 2015 semester

      GER 1905 -- Freshman Seminar: Remediating the Holocaust (Leslie Morris, Th 4:40-7:10pm, Kolthoff Hall 139)

      HIST 3727 -- History of the Holocaust (Melissa Kelley, M/W 9:45-11:00am, Nicholson 110)
      Study of 1933-1945 extermination of six million Jews and others by Nazi Germany on basis of race. European anti-Semitism. Implications of social Darwinism and race theory. Perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resistance. Theological responses of Jews and Christians. 

      GCC 3002 -- Grand Challenges: Beyond War and Atrocity (Alejandro Baer, Catherine Guisan, Tu/Th 11:15-12:30pm, Anderson Hall 330)

      SOC 4104 -- Crime and Human Rights (Joachim Savelsberg, Tu/Th 2:30-3:45pm, Blegen 225)

      AMIN 1001 -- American Indian Peoples in the United States (Tu/Th 1:00-2:15, Elliott N647)
      Introduction to how voices/visions of indigenous peoples have contributed to history of cultural expression in North America. Historic contexts/varieties of this expression by region, tribal cultures. Emphasizes contributions in literature, philosophy, politics, fine arts.

      AMIN 1003 -- American Indians in Minnesota (multiple listings)
      History, culture, and lived experience of American Indian people in Minnesota. Self-representation and histories of Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) and Dakota peoples through film, music, oral traditions, and written texts. Work by non-Indian scholars focuses on cultural, philosophical, and linguistic perspectives of Anishinaabe and Dakota peoples.

      HIST 3872 -- American Indian History since 1830 (W 6:20-8:30, Blegen 110)
      Focus on the impact of federal Indian policy on American Indian cultures and societies, and on American Indian culture change.

      HIST 5940 -- Topics in Asian History: Cultures of Modernity and Memories of the Past in East Asia (Liping Wang, W 3:35-5:30, Carlson 1-122)

      POL 8260 -- Topics in Political Theory: Colonialism (Th 3:35-5:20pm, Soc Sci 1383)

      POL 8660 -- Topics in Comparative Politics: Authoritarian Regimes (David Samuels, Tu 1:25-3:20pm, Blegen 330)

      SPAN 3221 -- Interpreting Colonial Latin America: Empire and Early Modernity (Raul Marrero-Fente, Tu/Thu 1:00-2:15pm, Nicholson 120)
      Conquest, colonization, and forms of resistance in Latin America.

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