University of Minnesota
Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies
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CHGS

  • Debbie Teicholz

    Debbie Teicholz

    Debbie Teicholz is a child of Holocaust survivors from Hungary and a graduate of New York University's film program. A photographer with intense interest in the Holocaust, she has exhibited extensively in the United States and in Israel. Her father, a survivor, worked with Raoul Wallenberg, the famous Swedish diplomat who saved 5,000 Jews in Budapest by giving them Swedish protection and passports. Her photography reflects manipulated image with tinting to suggest how survivors and their extended family see common elements of today's work in the context of the past. Note the triptych of cut logs, and the effect of appearing like bodies. When the artists sees tracks, she thinks of deportations. The series of four six foot long photographic triptychs are called Prayer by the Wall.

    Artist Statement

    "I was born to Eastern European Jewish survivors of the Holocaust. I grew up in the atmosphere of the Holocaust, living amid a plethora of personal accounts, Holocaust photographs and neurosis. I have chosen not to use archival images as symbols because I feel these images, which belong to our collective consciousness, often have a distancing effect on the viewer, because they are so recognizable and therefore emotionally dismissable. These images were photographed in Israel and Budapest in 1991 and 1992. They are intended to summon up associations of the Holocaust. As I smelled the freshly turned-over, rich, amber rows of Israeli earth, I thought about the rows of train tracks, and I still hear the silent screams. I walk through life with a displaced step, therefore I have chosen the triptych form to bear witness to the rhythm of the present past-present time warp in which I travel daily."

    Artworks: Witness and Legacy

    UntitledUntitledUntitled

    Untitled from Prayer by the Wall, 1991
    Photograph
    35" x 64"

    Teicholz's photos use some of the standard symbols which have emerged in recent Holocaust work: barbed wire, railroad tracks, scorched earth, mysterious vistas in towns and near railroad stations, cut trees that appear as bones.

    UntitledUntitledUntitled Untitled from Prayer by the Wall, 1991 Photograph
    35" x 64"
    UntitledUntitledUntitled Untitled from Prayer by the Wall, 1991 Photograph
    94" x 35"
    UntitledUntitledUntitled Untitled from Prayer by the Wall, 1991 Photograph
    64" x 35"

    Page updated 2013.